Toktok No 38 / Summer 2019

Source: Pacific Media Centre

Analysis published with permission of PMC

Pacific Media Centre

ISBN/code: ISSN 1175-0472

Publication date: Monday, February 18, 2019

Publisher: Pacific Media Centre

‘BE COURAGEOUS IN YOUR QUEST FOR TRUTH,’ PMC DIRECTOR TELLS PACIFIC JOURNALISM GRADUATES

Pacific journalism academic Professor David Robie believes the media play a critical role in exposing abuses of power in a world increasingly hostile towards journalists.

However, journalists in the Pacific are frequently “persecuted by smallminded politicians with scant regard for the role of the media,” he says.

Speaking at the 18th University of the South Pacific Journalism Student Awards ceremony at Laucala campus in Suva, Fiji, last October, Dr Robie said despite the growing global dangers surrounding the profession, journalism was critically important for democracy.

Dr Robie said that while such “ghastly fates” for journalists – such as the extrajudicial killing of Saudi dissident writer Jamal Khashoggi in Turkey earlier that month – may seem remote in the Pacific, there were plenty of attacks on media freedom to contend with, while trolls in the region and state threats to internet freedom were “also rife”.

Read more

Plus:

+ New communication award created for Pasifika women

+ Coverage of New Caledonia/Kanaky referendum, November 2018

+ Wansolwara and AUT coverage of Fiji elections, November 2018
 

MIL OSI

MIL OSI

Venezuela under siege – some class reflections from Max Lane

Source: Dr David Robie – Café Pacific – Analysis-Reportage:

Pro self-proclaimed “interim president” Guaido “Trumpeters” at a rally in Caracas. Image: TeleSUR
By Max Lane

IT IS necessary to understand that the conflict in Venezuela manifests a war between classes, not between factions of the one class, as in elections in “normal” bourgeois democracies.. The victor will not be inclined to give the other side a chance to come back into power “at the next election”.

We cannot expect the Chavistas to play by “normal” bourgeois electoral rules while the other side tries coups, economic sabotage, actively supports a foreign state’s economic sanctions, takes tens of millions from a hostile foreign state, attempts presidential assassination, and kills pro govt activists, while also owning all the private media.

Some expect the so-called liberal democratic rules of the game to be applied – but by one side only.

And what will be the result if the Venezuelan Bolivarian movement plays to lose and is defeated. Just remember two names: Pinochet and Suharto.

All out class war for a state based one class or the other has usually been resolved militarily, through a revolutionary war (Russia, China, Vietnam, Cuba) or counter-revolutionary violence (Indonesia, Chile). Uniquely, in the case of Venezuela, neither war nor a counter-revolution has yet occurred, even 20 years on.

My guess is that the Chavistas are constrained to show restraint towards the capitalist class, avoiding escalation to a military confrontation, because of one main factor: the threat of military destruction.

Libya showed that the US was willing to see a country go to hell as long as oil could still flow. The US is now threatening military intervention – but to militarise a class war in Venezuela will run the risk of it spreading beyond national borders.

Economic constraints
Besides this constraint, the Venezuealan Bolivarians have been constrained by the objective limits of a 3rd world economy – and a 3rd world economy under siege and with no Soviet Union to protect or aid it, only valiant and principled little Cuba.

When Chavez became President in 1998, the GDP had already fallen back to 1963 levels. Corruption, including in the oil sector, was endemic. Immediately on Chavez’s election US and local capitalist economic sabotage began.

Underpinning this is the reality of a 3rd world economy in an imperialist world economy. The achievements of the Chavez government in improving economic conditions in these circumstances between 1998 and when oil prices started to fall in 2013 was extremely impressive.

Declining oil prices in a country 90 percent dependent on oil for foreign exchange hit the economy hard, all worsened by ongoing economic sabotage from within and without. From August 2017, the sabotage became even more savage with intensified US economic sanctions.

The Chavista government, like the governments of all 3rd world countries, most of whom are still pro-capitalist, did not have the financial capacity (capital) or access to technology (monopolised by imperialist countries) to embark on any significant program of diversified industrialisation.

This has not occurred anywhere by a medium sized poor country, let alone by an anti-capitalist government under siege, still consolidating itself.

Active support
The 2018 presidential elections showed the current government had the active support of 6 million Venezuelans, mostly from among the poor. The demonstrations over the last few days shows that this 6 million will still struggle, struggle to win more to their side.

More elections may figure in the evolution of this struggle, but we should all note that any such new election processes, should they occur, will be part of a struggle where one side, since the beginning, from at least 2002, has resorted to coups, economic sabotage, political collaboration with a hostile foreign power (much deeper than anything D. Trump may have been involved in), among other “non rules of the game” practices.

Only recognise the Maduro government!

Demand the end of economic sanctions against the Venezuealan people and state!

No to any US military intervention!

MIL OSI

A life well lived paves way to encourage Pasifika women in communication

Source: Pacific Media Centre

Analysis published with permission of PMC

Geraldine Lopdell’s family was looking for a fitting way to celebrate a “life well lived” when they decided to set up one of AUT’s newest awards.

During life, Geraldine had been an excellent teacher and artist, a supportive and generous friend and a captivating storyteller with an adventurous spirit.

Her early years were spent in Tonga and Samoa where her family travelled for her father’s work, and she had a firm belief that more women’s stories and views – particularly those of Pasifika women – needed to be told and heard.

The Geraldine Lopdell Award for Diversity in Communication will encourage Pasifika women to tell their stories. The first prize will be given in April 2019, nearly one year after Geraldine’s passing. It will be set at $1,200, and is anticipated to be offered annually for an initial term of ten years.

Deciding a memorial award to support something she cared about would be a fitting way to celebrate her life, Geraldine’s partner Colin and her two daughters Alex and Anne had approached their family friend, AUT’s Professor David Robie and have since been working with the AUT Foundation to establish the award.

Professor Robie, who heads up AUT’s Pacific Media Centre – Te Amokura, suggested a prize be established alongside the existing Storyboard Award for Diversity Reporting. It was decided the Pacific Media Centre, with its focus on telling ignored and ‘untold’ stories, and amplifying Pasifika women’s voices, was a natural fit for an award to celebrate this special woman’s legacy.

The family believe that Geraldine would have been honoured to have this award established in her name as she would have wanted to value the contributions and perspectives of Pasifika women.

Future generations
As Colin says: “The award is about recognising the life of an extraordinary and wonderful woman by encouraging an extraordinary and wonderful woman at the start of her career. She would have liked her legacy to support the next generation.

“It’s not just about making a financial difference to the recipient, although clearly we hope that it will help. It is about saying to them that we acknowledge your hard work, we recognise your achievements, you are doing brilliantly, keep going!”

Setting an award up is fairly straightforward, Alex says: “and you can direct it in a way to match up with the social changes that you want to encourage and see. It’s something that can benefit future generations and depending how you set it up, it can go on in perpetuity.’

Alex and Colin say they would love to see more awards of this type, “because you don’t have to have a huge amount of money to do something small and positive. We’d love to see other people think in this space and unleash that potential.”

Stand by for news of the first recipient of the Geraldine Lopdell Memorial Award for Excellence in Communication – and undoubtedly, a few great stories from the recipient.
 
The Geraldine Lopdell Award for Diversity in Communication – criteria and background

More information

MIL OSI

MIL OSI

PMC indicative outputs

Source: Pacific Media Centre

Analysis published with permission of PMC

Research outputs from the Pacific Media Centre and research associates include:

2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 20122011 | 2010 |

2019

Media outputs:
Robie, David (2019, January 25). Typhoon Usman and nightmarish holiday times in Bicol. Asia Pacific Report.

2018

Refereed journal articles:
Robie, David (2018). Killing the messenger [Editorial]. Pacific Journalism Review : Te Koakoa, 24(2), 6-11.
Robie, David (2018). Journalism under duress in Asia-Pacific: A decade of resistance: The Pacific Media Centre, Pacific Media Watch, impunity and human rights. Pacific Journalism Review : Te Koakoa, 24(2), 12-32.
Robie, David (2018).
Asia Pacific Report: A New Zealand nonprofit journalism model for campus-based social justice media. IKAT: The Indonesian Journal of Southeast Asian Studies,2(1), 119-147. https://doi.org/10.22146/ikat.v2i1.37395
Frain, Sylvia (2018). ‘Make America Secure’: Media, militarism and climate change in the Marianas Archipelago. Pacific Journalism Review : Te Koakoa, 24(2), 218-240.
Robie, David (2018). A crusade for media truth and justice [Review]. Pacific Journalism Review : Te Koakoa, 24(2), 258-262.
Robie, David (2018). Indonesian repression and betrayal in West Papua [Review]. Pacific Journalism Review : Te Koakoa, 24(2), 266-271.
Wahyuni, H., Fitrah, A., Handayani, F., & Robie, D. (2018). Ecological communication in Asia-Pacific: A comparative analysis of social adaptation to maritime disaster in Indonesia and Fiji. Pacific Journalism Review : Te Koakoa, 24(1), 12-36. https://doi.org/10.24135/pjr.v24i1.390
Robie, David (2018). Bearing Witness 2017: Year 2 of a Pacific climate change storytelling project. Pacific Journalism Review : Te Koakoa, 24(1), 155-177. https://doi.org/10.24135/pjr.v24i1.415
Robie, David (2018).  IKAT on the right track [Editorial foreword]. IKAT: The Indonesian Journal of Southeast Asian Studies, 1(2), v-viii.
https://doi.org/10.22146/ikat.v1i2.33204

Edited journals:
Robie, David; Rahman, Khairiah; and Cass, Philip; (eds.). (2018, November). Journalism Under Duress in Asia-Pacific. Pacific Journalism Review : Te Koakoa, 23(2). 278pp.
Robie, David; Rahman, Khairiah; Cass, Philip; Wahyuni, Hermin Indah;  and Yulianto, Vissia Ita (eds). (2018, July). Disasters, Cyclones & Communication: Connecting the dots in Asia-Pacific. Pacific Journalism Review : Te Koakoa, 24(1). 249pp.

Conference proceedings:
Robie, David; and Marbrook, Jim (2018). Bearing Witness 2018: A climate change journalism/documentary development project. DevNet 2018: Disruption and Renewal conference. 
Robie, David (2018). Pacific Media Centre: Driving an innovative journalism research and publication strategy. NZ Institute for Pacific Research (NZIPR) conference
Robie, David (2018). Kele’a, va, kororonga, talanoa and tapoetethakot: Expanding millennial notions of ‘Pacific way’ journalism education and media research culture. 26th Asia Media Information and Communication (AMIC) Centre Conference, Manipal, South India.

Media outputs:
Tom, Blessen (2018, November 30). Media freedom in Pacific a growing challenge, says journalism academic. Asia Pacific Report [Online].
Robie, David (2018, November 8). Kanaky independence campaign rolls on … encouraged by ballot result. [Part 2]. Asia Pacific Report [Online].
Robie, David (2018, November 7). New Caledonia stirs painful memories – and a hopeful future [Part 2]. Asia Pacific Report [Online].
Nakhid, Camille (2018, September 15). Camille talks to TTT Live about ‘decolonising’ research. Trinidad and Tobago Television.
Ellis, Gavin (2018, August 23). RNZ None to Noon tribute to Pacific Media Centre postgraduate students. [Commentary on Radio New Zealand]. 
Robie, David (2018, August 7). David Robie talks to Radio 531pi host Ma’a Brian Sagala about the legacy of the 1985 South Pacific Nuclear Free Zone Treaty. [Interview with Radio 531].
Robie, David (2018, July 16). Contrasting accounts of Indonesian genocide and betrayal in West Papua. Asia Pacific Report. [Online]
Robie, David (2018, July 10). ‘Sick joke’, threats cited in Asia Pacific declining media freedom summit. Asia Pacific Report. [Online]
Frain, Sylvia (2018, June 18). Julian Aguon: ‘We cannot footnote our way to freedom’. Pacific Media Centre Online. [Online]
Robie, David (2018, June 12). ‘Fake news’ and milennials’ lack of media judgment a challenge, says leading Indian academic. Asia Pacific Report. [Online]
Marbrook, Jim (2018, May 18). Conflict, Custom and Conscience. Spasifik Magazine.
Bell, Jean (2018, May 4). PMC director condemns ‘targeting’ of journalists and silence on West Papua. [Seminar by Dr David Robie]. Asia Pacific Report.
Robie, David (2018, May 3). Media freedom under attack. [Interview with Islands Business.]
Robie, David (2018, May 3). Free media week killings underscore crimes of impunity against journalists. Asia Pacific Report.
Frain, Sylvia (2018, February 27). Climate change media tools helpful, but more Pacific indigenous perspectives needed. Pacific Media Centre Online.
Robie, David (2018, February 25). More frontline research ‘by Pacific for Pacific’ plea at climate conference. Asia Pacific Report [Online].
Robie, David (2018, February 24). Juffa blasts PNG resources ‘sell out’ but tells of Managalas hope. Asia Pacific Report [Online].
Robie, David (2018, February 23). Underestimate climate change political upheaval ‘at peril’, warns former PM. Asia Pacific Report [Online].
Peacock, Colin (2018, February 18). Independent news coverage shrinks as NZ Newswire shut down [RNZ Mediawatch quoting interview with David Robie on Pacific media coverage]. RNZ Mediawatch [Online and audio]
Robie, David (2018, February 7). A timely media strategy to empower citizens [Review]. Asia Pacific Report [Online]
Robie, David (2018, November 28). Coups, globalisation and Fiji’s reset structures of ‘democracy’ [Review]. Asia Pacific Report [Online]
Robie, David (2018, November 18). UN critics joined global outrage over Duterte’s Rappler ‘free press’ attack. Asia Pacific Report [Online]

2017

Edited books:
Marbrook, Jim; Abcede, Del; Robertson, Natalie; & Robie, David (eds.) (2017). Conflict, custom & conscience: Photojournalism and the Pacific Media Centre 2007-2017. Auckland: Pacific Media Centre, Auckland University of Technology. 80pp. ISBN 978-1-927184-44-5

Refereed journal articles:
Nakhid, C. (2017). The coping strategies and responses of African youth in New Zealand to their encounters with the police.
Journal of Ethnicity in Criminal Justice. https://doi.org/10.1080/15377938.2017.1413609
Nakhid, C. (2017). Police encounters with African youth in New Zealand – the impact on the youth, family, and community. Safer Communities, 16(2), pp.64-76, https://doi.org/10.1108/SC-01-2017-0001
Robie, David (2017). Indonesian double standards over press freedom endanger safety of Papuan journalists. Media Asia, 44(1 ), 40-47. doi: 10.1080/01296612.2017.1379812
Robie, David (2017). Tanah Papua, Asia-Pacific news blind spots and citizen media: From the ‘Act of Free Choice’ betrayal to a social media revolution. Pacific Journalism Review: Te Koakoa, 23(2), 159-178. doi: 10.24135/pjr.v23i2.334
Robie, David (2017). Timely climate media strategy to empower citizens [Review]. Pacific Journalism Review : Te Koakoa, 23(2), 221-224. doi: 10.24135/pjr.v23i2.337
Robie, David (2017). The insecurity legacy of the Rainbow Warrior affair: A human rights transition from nuclear to climate change refugees.  Pacific Dynamics, 1(1), 133-152.
Robie, David (2017). Bearing Witness 2016: A Fiji climate change journalism case study. Pacific Journalism Revie : Te Koakoa, 23(1), 115-133. doi: 10.24135/pjr.v23i1.257
Robie. David (2017). Timely strategic research spotlights killing of journalists [Review]. Pacific Journalism Review : Te Koakoa, 23(1),  220-222. doi: 10.24135/pjr.v23i1.323
Robie, David (2017). Refreshed digital journalism education mission needed [Review]. Pacific Journalism Review : Te Koakoa, 23(1), 227-228.  doi: 10.24135/pjr.v23i1.322

Refereed monographs:
Morris, Ricardo (2017). Watching our words: Perceptions of self-censorship and media freedom in Fiji. Pacific Journalism Monograph No 6. 56pp. ISBN: 9781927184448

Edited journals:
Robie, David; and Nash, Philip (eds). (2017, November 30). Media education in Asia-Pacific. Pacific Journalism Review : Te Koakoa, 23(2). 230pp.
Robie, David; Nash, Chris; and Singh, Shailendra (eds.). (2017, July 21). Climate change in Asia-Pacific. Pacific Journalism Review : Te Koakoa, 23(1). 284pp.

Conference proceedings:
Robie, David (2017). Asia Pacific Report: A radical non-profit journalism model for campus-based social justice media. Social Movements Resistance and Social Change III Conference, Victoria University of Wellington, September 2016. Pages 110-148. Published 30 August 2017.

Postgraduate research degree:
Frain, Sylvia C. (2017). Fanohge Famalåo’an & Fan’tachu Fama’lauan: Women Rising Indigenous Resistance to Militarization in the Marianas Archipelago. Unpublished doctoral thesis, National Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies, University of Otago).

Media outputs:
Robie, David (2017, November 18). Tiny Timbulsloko fights back in face of Indonesia’s ‘ecological disaster’. Asia Pacific Report [Online]
Robie, David (2017, November 15). Indonesia’s development dilemmas – a green info gap and budget pressure. Asia Pacific Report [Online].
Borrowdale, James (2017, July 22). Why Pacific and Maori communities are rising up for a free West Papua. Asia Pacific Report and VICE [Extensive interview with PMC’s David Robie). [Online].
Cherkaoui, Tarek (2017, July 11). Autocracy strikes back: Media freedom under siege in Arabia. Asia Pacific Report [Online].
Robie, David (2017, June 11). Flashback to NZ’s nuclear-free law 1987: Challenging Goliath. Asia Pacific Report/New Internationist.
Hutt, Kendall (2017, May 31). Duterte’s ‘war on drugs’ killings spark row during NZ human rights seminar. Asia Pacific Report [Online].
Nakhid, Camille (2017, May 19). ‘I want my children back’ – Fighting for Australia’s indigenous children. Asia Pacific Report [Online].
Nakhid, Camille (2017, May 13).Uncle Shane on Australia’s shame: ‘We’re the vulnerable ones, the ones without a voice’. Asia Pacific Report [Online]
Robie, David (2017, May 12). An Indonesian oasis of progressive creativity emerges in culture city. Asia Pacific Report [Online + video].
Robie, David (2017, May 7). Rave hospitality, but Indonesia fails West Papua with media freedom hypocrisy. Asia Pacific Report [Online].
Bryce, Brindi (2017, February 9). VANUATU: Media now in uncharted territory with FOI law now in place #9803. Asia Pacific Report. [Radio Australia Pacific Beat Interview with Prof David Robie by Bindi Bryce].
Bryce, Brindi (2017, February 9). Vanuatu media in unchartered territory as Freedom of Information law becomes a reality. ABC Pacific Beat. [Interview with Prof David Robie by Bindi Bryce].
Pacific Media Watch (2017, July 13). PNG court silences political blogger’s comments, blogger posts gag image. IFEX [Canada].
Pacific Media Watch (2017, July 13). PNG court silences political blogger’s comments, blogger posts gag image. Asia Pacific Report.
Robie, David (2017, January 15). Endangered – the frontline journalism of outrage [Review]. Asia Pacific Report.
Robie, David (2017, January 12). Florida airport shootings – few basic questions being asked. Asia Pacific Report.
Pacific Media Watch Freedom Project (2017). Full year’s research and current affairs file. Pacific Media Centre.

2016

Authored book chapters:
Robie, David (2016). ‘Unfree and unfair’? Media intimidation in Fiji’s 2014 election. In Lawson, Stephanie, and Ratuva, Steven (Eds.), The People Have Spoken: The 2014 Elections in Fiji (pp. 83-107). Canberra: Australian National University.

Robie, David (2015). Unfree and unfair? Media intimidation in Fiji’s 2014 election. In Ratuva, Steve, and Lawson, Stephanie, Fiji’s 2014 General Election. Canberra: Australian National University (Forthcoming). – See more at: https://dev.aut.ac.nz/profiles/david-robie#sthash.jCFOPQSW.dpuf

Robie, David (2015). Unfree and unfair? Media intimidation in Fiji’s 2014 election. In Ratuva, Steve, and Lawson, Stephanie, Fiji’s 2014 General Election. Canberra: Australian National University (Forthcoming). – See more at: https://dev.aut.ac.nz/profiles/david-robie#sthash.jCFOPQSW.dpuf

Edited books/journals:
Neilson, Michael (2016). Pacific Way: Auckland’s Pasifika community diaspora media. Pacific Journalism Monograph No. 5. (72 pages)
Cass, Philip, and Robie, David (2016). Journalism Education in the Pacific. Pacific Journalism Review, 22(2). (216 pages).
Robie, David (2016, May). Endangered JournalistsPacific Journalism Review, 22(1). (262 pages).

Refereed journal articles:
Robie, David (2016). From Pacific Scoop to Asia-Pacific Report: A case study in an independent campus-industry media partnership. Pacific Journalism Review, 22(2), 64-86.
Robie, David (2016). La’o Hamutuk and Timor-Leste’s development challenges: A case study in human rights and collaborative journalism. Media Asia, 42(3-4), 209-224.
Robie, David (2016). Tanah Papua, Asia-Pacific news blind spots and citizen media: From the ‘Act of Free Choice’ betrayal to a social media revolution. 51st Foreign Policy School: Global Polics from State to Social Media, Conference proceedings.
Robie, David (2016). Frontline 2: Rainbow Warrior, secrecy and state terrorism: A Pacific journalism case study. Pacific Journalism Review, 22(1), 187-213.

Theses/dissertations:
Alzowaimil, Majid A. (2016). After the Arab Spring: An analysis of the future of journalism in the Middle East. AUT Master of Communication Studies thesis.
Abplanalp, Karen (2016). Media restrictions on Papua – understanding the restrictions. AUT Master of Communication Studies exegesis and microsite.

Conference papers:
Robie, David (2016, September 1-3). From Un Tavur to Asia Pacific Report: Case studies in campus-based social justice media. Counter Futures Conference, “Social Movements, Resistance and Social Change”, Victoria University, Wellington.
Robie, David (2016, July 2). Tanah Papua, Asia Pacific news blind spots and citizen media. Otago Foreign Policy School, Otago University, Dunedion, 1-3 July 2016.
Robie, David (2016, April 17). Pacific human rights as a ‘mindful’ journalist. [Extracted from keynote address by Dr Robie].”Enhancing a Human rights-based approach to news reporting” Forum in Nadi, Fiji, 13-15 April 2016.

Media outputs:
Robie, David (2016, December 3). Carry on Fidel Castro’s global legacy, urges Cuban ambassador. Asia Pacific Report.
Robie, David (2016, September 19). Philippines ‘hit man’ allegations spur renewed calls for killings probe. Asia Pacific Report.
Robie, David (2016, September 3). Rendezvous with the ‘no nukes’ Aneityum cover girl after 33 years. Vanuatu Daily Post.
Camille Nakhid (2016, July 30). A Wiradjuri grandmother’s sad story: ‘The Stolen Generations have never stopped’. Asia Pacific Report.
Camille Nakhid (2016, July 22). Still stealing the generations – the abduction of Indigenous Australian children still goes on. Asia Pacific Report.
David Robie (2016, July 17). Speak-up Korerotia: David Robie and panel talk citizen media and human rights. Plains FM Radio. [Interviewer Sally Carlton.]
Camille Nakhid (2016, July 22). Still stealing the generations – the abduction of Indigenous Australian children still goes on. Asia Pacific Report.
David Robie (2016, July 6). Interviewed by 95bFM’s Andrew Winstanley on the university student unrest in PNG. 95bFM, University of Auckland.
David Robie (2016, July 4). NZ media ‘ignore’ Pacific’s biggest story in spite of social media revolution. Asia Pacific Report
David Robie (2016, May 26). Pacific corruption-fighters worried as online database faces uncertain future. [Interview with Jemima Garrett]. Radio Australia Pacific Beat.
David Robie (2016, April 28). ‘Pacific media ought to bear witness to human rights violations’ – David Robie. Triple RRRT Project of the United Nations Development Programme, Nadi, Fiji.
David Robie (2016, April 26). PMC director calls for ‘voice for the voiceless’ at Pacific human rights forum. AUT News.
David Robie (2016, April 21). Fear of reprisal puts limit on Pacific human rights journalism, say advocates. Asia Pacific Report.
David Robie (2016, April 21). Fear of reprisal limiting human rights journalism [ Interview with Ben Robinson]. RNZI Dateline Pacific, Wellington.
David Robie (2016, April 19). Tell the truth, journos told [Interview with Margaret Wise]. The Fiji Times, Suva.
David Robie (2016, April 14). Workshop for journos. The Fiji Times, Suva.
David Robie (2016, April 14). Media have big future. Fiji Sun, Suva.
David Robie, (2016, April 13). Focus on journos. The Fiji Times, Suva.
David Robie (2016, April 9). Polar bear mojo for Rainbow Warrior skipper’s environmental thriller [Review of Greenpeace Captain]. Asia Pacific Report.
Alastair Wanklyn (2016, April 6). Panama Papers: China censors allegations, but Russian media notes contents. [Interview with David Robie]. Asia Pacific Report.
Alastair Wanklyn (2016, April 5). China, squelches Panama allegations, but Russia media note contents [Interview with David Robie]. The Japan Times.
David Robie (2016, March 30). Panel interview with ‘Bomber’ Bradbury on Radio Waatea & The Daily Blog’s Fifth Estate. Asia Pacific Report [Video]
Frain, Sylvia C. (2016, March 3). Mariana Islands community groups to sue US Navy over at risk wildlife. Asia Pacific Report.
David Robie (2016, February 17). Mystery of the 1983 Vanuatu ‘nuclear free’ girl finally solved. Cafe Pacific.

2015

Authored books:
Robie, David (2015, June): Don’t Spoil My Beautiful Face: Media, Mayhem and Human Rights in the Pacific [2nd edition]. Auckland: Little Island Press in association with the Pacific Media Centre.

Robie, David (2015, July): Eyes of Fire: The Last Voyage of the Rainbow Warrior [5th Edition]. Auckland: Little Island Press.

Authored book chapters:
Robie, David (2015). Unfree and unfair? Media intimidation in Fiji’s 2014 election. In Ratuva, Steve, and Lawson, Stephanie, Fiji’s 2014 General Election. Canberra: Australian National University (In production).

Robie, David (2015). Unfree and unfair? Media intimidation in Fiji’s 2014 election. In Ratuva, Steve, and Lawson, Stephanie, Fiji’s 2014 General Election. Canberra: Australian National University (Forthcoming). – See more at: https://dev.aut.ac.nz/profiles/david-robie#sthash.jCFOPQSW.dpuf

Robie, David (2015). Unfree and unfair? Media intimidation in Fiji’s 2014 election. In Ratuva, Steve, and Lawson, Stephanie, Fiji’s 2014 General Election. Canberra: Australian National University (Forthcoming). – See more at: https://dev.aut.ac.nz/profiles/david-robie#sthash.jCFOPQSW.dpuf

Edited books/journals:
Robie, David; King, Barry; Cass, Philip, and Bacon, Wendy (2015, May). Political Journalism in the Asia-Pacific [Book edition].  Pacific Journalism Review, 21(1): 262 pages.

King, Barry, Goldson, Annie; and Robie, David (2015, October). Documentary Practice in the Asia-Pacific. Pacific Journalism Review, 21(2): 217 pages.

Refereed journal articles:
Aslam, Rukhsana (2015). Media, politics and the threats to journalists in Pakistan. Pacific Journalism Review, 21(1): 178-195.

Korauaba, Taberannang (2015). Kiribati in review: Pacific Political Reviews. The Contemporary Pacific, 27(1): 232-237.

Robie, David (2015). Advocating Journalism Practice-as-research: A Case for Recognition in the New Zealand PBRF Context. Asia Pacific Media Educator, 25(1): 1-12.doi:10.1177/1326365X15575591

Robie, David (2015). Cybercrime, criminal libel and the media: From ‘e-martial law’ to the Magna Carta in the Philippines. Pacific Journalism Review, 21(1): 212-230.

Robie, David (2015). La’o Hamutuk and Timor-Leste’s development challenges: A case study in human rights and collaborative journalism. Media Asia. (In production).

Media outputs:

David Robie (2015, November). Rainbow Warrior’s truth-seeking remembered as secrecy lingers. Pen, Sydney.

Crispin Maslog (2015, July 21). Asia-Pacific Analysis: Digital revolution sweeps Pacific (citing AMIC plenary keynote by David Robie). SciDevNet

Ed Rampell (2015, July 10). Thirty years later: The bombing of the Rainbow Warrior [David Robie profile]. Earth Island Journal

David Robie (2015, July 10). Rainbow Warrior redux: French terrorism in the South Pacific. Pacific Media Centre.

David Robie (2015, July 10). Rainbow Warrior redux: French terrorism in the South Pacific. Eyes of Fire: 30 Years On [Online microsite published by Little Island Press].

David Robie (2015, July 10). Rainbow: Warrior: My Eyes of Fire anniversary message. Cafe Pacific.

David Robie (2015, July 5). David Robie discusses the Rainbow Warrior with French community radio on Planet FM hosted by Elisabeth Degremont.

David Robie (2015, July 4). Double-page spread article by David Robie in the Vanuatu Daily Post weekend.

David Robie (2015, July 3). David Robie discusses the Rainbow Warrior with French news agency AFP – Neil Sands.

David Robie (2015, June 29). David Robie discusses the Rainbow Warrior with German news agency DPA – Christiane Oelrich.

David Robie (2015, June 29). David Robie analyses the Melanesian Spearhead Group decision on West Papua [Southern Cross]. Interviewed by Nick Bond, Radio 95bFM.

David Robie (2015, June 28). Fiji, PNG lead betrayal, but West Papua still triumphs. [Cafe Pacific].

Alistar Kata (2015, April 20). Alistar Kata discusses South Pacific Forum issues. [Southern Cross]. Interviewed by Nick Bond, Radio 95bFM.

Shailendra Singh (2015, April 17). Nuclear testing legacy haunts Pacific island people. [Interview with PMC’s David Robie]. IDN-InDepth News.

David Robie and Alistar Kata (2015, April 13). David Robie and Alistar Kata talk on Pacific issues. [The Wire]. Interviewed by Nick Bond, Radio 95bFM.

David Robie (2015, April 11). David Robie discusses West Papua human rights and media issues. [Talanoa]. Interviewed by Marama Papalii, TVNZ Tagata Pasifika.
 

2014

Authored books:
Robie, David (2014, April 24): Don’t Spoil My Beautiful Face: Media, Mayhem and Human Rights in the Pacific. Auckland: Little Island Press in association with the Pacific Media Centre.

Edited books/journals:
Bacon, Wendy; Morton, Tom; and Robie, David (2014, May). Investigative journalism trends. Pacific Journalism Review, 20(1): 267 pages.

Robie, David; Duffield, Lee (2014, November). ‘Failed’ states and the environment. Pacific Journalism Review, 20(2): 262 pages.

Robie, David (2014, December). Pacific Journalism Monograph No 4. Twentieth Anniversary of Pacific Journalism Review Conference Proceedings (69 pages).

Refereed journal articles:
Korauaba, T. (2014). Kiribati media, science and politics: telling the story of climate change in a ‘disappearing nation’. Pacific Journalism Monograph No 3 (34pp). Auckland: Pacific Media Centre.

Robie, David (2014).  Pacific Media Watch and protest in Oceania: An investigative free media case study. Pacific Journalism Review, 20(1): 35–60.

Robie, David (2014). Lies, media integrity and the new digital environment. Pacific Journalism Review, 20(1): 242-246.

Robie, David (2014). Shooting the messenger, Pacific style. Media Development [Canada]. LXI(3); 6-10.

Robie, David (2014). Pacific Media Watch: beyond parochial news. Media Asia [Singapore], 41(3): 220-226.

Robie, David (2014). ‘Carbon colonialism’: Pacific environmental risk, media credibility and a deliberative perspective. Pacific Journalism Review, 20(2): 59-76.

Oosterman, Allison (2014). ‘The silence of the Sphinx’: The delay in organising the media coverage of World War II. Pacific Journalism Review, 20(2): 187-204.

Conference papers:
Robie, David (2014). Coconet w-fi, digital technology, business and education. Oral -presentation – plenary. Asian Development Bank (ADB), Pacific Business Media Summit, Sydney, Australia. 25-26 March 2014.

Robie, David (2014). West Papua: The Pacific’s secret shame: the challenges for Pacific news media. Oral presentation – keynote. Faculty of Law, University of Auckland. 1-2 August 2014.

Robie, David, and Abcede, Delia (2014). Cybercrime, criminal libel and the media: from ‘e-martial law’ to the Magna Carta in the Philippines. Pacific Journalism Review Twentieth Anniversary Conference, AUT University, 27-29 November 2014.

Postgraduate research degree:
Aslam, R. (2014). The role of media in conflict: integrating peace journalism in the journalism curriculum. Unpublished doctoral thesis.

Report:
Ismael, B., and Robie, D. (2014). Written submission for the United Nations Human Rights Council Universal Periodic Review 19th Session by Reporters Without Borders and the Pacific Media Centre on the state of freedom of expression and access to information in Fiji. Paris: Reporters Sans Frontières; Auckland: Pacific Media Centre.

Media outputs:
David Robie (2014, December 15). Behind the elusive mythmaking over Fiji, West Papua. Pacific Politics [Online publication of the Pacific Institute of Public Policy]. Port Vila, Vanuatu.

David Robie (2014, September 28). Fiji elections – freedom and fairness for the media? Interviewed by Colin Peacock, Radio NZ Mediawatch.

David Robie (2014, September 27): From Fiji’s dictatorship to ‘democracy’ – the AUT student team on the job. Commentary on The Daily Blog.

David Robie (2014, September 24). Punitive media law in Fiji must be repealed. Interviewed by Steve Chase, ABC News Drive.

David Robie (2014, September 23). Call for repeal of Fiji’s media decree. Interviewed by Bruce Hill, Radio Australia.

Alistar Kata (2014, September 22). Some Fiji media accused of bias over election coverage. Interviewed by Bruce Hill, Radio Australia.

David Robie (2014, September 20). A Fiji democratic mandate for the coup leader – what now for the media? Café Pacific, New Zealand.

David Robie (2014, September 17). Watchdog hits out a Fiji media. Interviewed by Alex Perrottet, Radio NZ International.

Alistar Kata (2014, September 9).  Student journalist on the challenges of covering Fiji’s election. Interviewed by Bruce Hill on Radio Australia’s Pacific Beat.

Anna Majavu, David Robie (2014, August 28): East Timor court media ruling sparks confusion, triggers global petition – Lasse Underbjerg. Pacific Scoop.

David Robie (2014, August 28). Interview on Fiji Return to Democracy seminar, Reporter. Ruci Farrell. Pacific Radio Network.

David Robie (2014, August 12). Media freedom in West Papua exposed. Video interview by Struan Purdie, Pacific Media Centre Online.

David Robie (2014, June 15): David Robie on human rights in the Pacific – Wallace Chapman. Radio New Zealand’s Sunday.

David Robie (2014, June 8): David Robie talks media freedom on Radio Australia – Phil Kafcaloudes . Radio Australia.

David Robie (2014, May 29): David Robie talks media freedom to Media Watch – Richard Aedy. Radio Australia’s Media Watch.

David Robie (2014, May 3). E-libel laws the new front line in Pacific battle for press freedom. The Conversation.

David Robie (2014, April 24): New book focusing on secret history of Pacific – Indira Moala. Radio NZ International.

David Robie (2014, January 20): East Timor takes on Australia in ‘rip off’ spy case with country’s future on line. PMC Online Special Reports.

Pacific Media Watch outputs at: www.pacmediawatch.aut.ac.nz

2013

Authored books:
Robie, David (2013): Media, Mayhem and Human Rights. Auckland: Little Island Press. (Forthcoming).

Edited books/journals:
King, Barry, Johnson, Rosser, and Oosterman, Allison (2013, October). Celebrity and Scandal. Pacific Journalism Review, 19(2): 255 pages.

Singh, Shailendra, and Robie, David (2013, May). Media and Democracy in the Pacific. Pacific Journalism Review, 19(1): 309 pages.

Refereed journal articles:
Drageset, Daniel (2013). Constructing ‘dark’ celebrity: The case of Anders Breivik. Pacific Journalism Review, 19(2): 70-85.

Robie, David (2013). Conflict reporting in the South Pacific: A critical reflexive approach to Timor-Leste and West Papua. Media Asia, 40(2): 147-161.

Robie, David (2013). Coups, conflicts and human rights: Pacific media paradigms and challenges. Asia Pacific Media Educator, 22(2): 217-229.

Robie, David (2013). The talanoa and the tribal paradigm. Reflections on cross-cultural reporting in the Pacific. Australian Journalism Review, 35(1): 43-58.

Robie, David (2013). ‘Four World’ news values revisited: A deliberative journalism paradigm for Pacific media. Pacific Journalism Review, 19(1): 84-110.

Rahman, Khairiah A. (2013). Life imitating art: Asian romance movies as a social mirror. Pacific Journalism Review, 19(1): 107-121.

Commissioned report:
Robie, David (2013). Fiji, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Solomon Islands and Tonga media freedom reports. Freedom House Freedom of the Press Report 2013.

Conference contributions:
Robie, David (2013): Pacific media watch and protest in Oceania: A case study of a campus-based free media collective. Protest and the Media conference, University of Westminster, London, United Kingdom, 12-13 June 2013.

Robie, David (2013). Deliberative journalism, environmental risk and media credibility. Islands and Nations: ‘Failed states’ and the environment in the Pacific conference. University of the South Pacific, Suva, Fiji, 10-11 July 2013.

Robie, David (2013). An Asia-Pacific free media paradigm: Challenging a parochial news ethos in Aotearoa. Asian Media Information and Communication Centre (AMIC) 22nd international conference, Yogyakarta, Indonesia. 4-7 July 2013.

Oral presentations:
Robie, David (2013). Relatoriu media nia liberdade iha Azia Pasifiku liqa ho Timor-Leste. La’o Hamutuk – Timor-Leste Institute of Reconstruction Monitoring and Analysis, Dili, Timor-Leste, 26 November 2013.

Robie, David (2013). Foreign reporting challenges in the South Pacific: Advocacy, activist groups and civil society. Danish School of Media and Journalism, Aarhus, Denmark, 23 October 2013.

Robie, David (2013). Climate change, conflict and global news: Critical media issues facing Pacific micro states. Institute of Media Studies, Stockholm University, Sweden. 17 October 2013.

Robie, David (2013). Foreign reporting challenges in the South Pacific: A Pacific Media Watch free press case study. Institute of Media Studies, Stockholm University, Sweden. 17 October 2013.

Masters in Communication Studies thesis:
Yamo, Henry (2013). Mobile phones in rural Papua New Guinea: A transformation in health communication and delivery services in Western Highlands Province. Unpublished MCS thesis in the School of Communication Studies.

Media outputs:

David Robie (2013, Dec 20). East Timor’s Independente champions genuine ‘free press’. PMC Online Special Reports.

David Robie (2013, Nov 25): Read draft media law first, East Timor’s print adviser tells critics. Cafe Pacific ISSN 1562-4315.

David Robie (2013, July 28): David Robie talks Rainbow Warrior and the media. Newstalk ZB programme Total Recall.

David Robie on Fiji politics and the media (2013, Jan 21). The David Beatson Interview, Triangle TV

Daniel Drageset (2013). Series of interviews with Radio 95bFM programme on Pacific affairs (Pacific Media Watch project).

Pacific Media Watch research project:
Daniel Drageset (2013, November 7). Interview with Jason Garman, media and communications manager of Oxfam New Zealand, about women’s issues and sanitary issues  in Papua New Guinea. (Audio story published on PS/PMW)

Daniel Drageset/Shilo Kino (2013, November 6). Interview with Monalisa Palu, national coordinator in New Zealand for the cultural tourism support programme in Tonga, about development of cultural tourism in Tonga (specifically with regards to Tongan handicrafts). Tourism advisor Elizabeth Latham was also interviewed.  (Audio story published on PS/PMW)

Daniel Drageset (2013, November 1). Interview with Florent Eurisouké, environmental campaigner in New Caledonia, about his involvement in Jim Marbrook’s upcoming documentary Cap Bocage + possible New Caledonian independence, the future of the Kanak people and other issues. Kanak elder Jean “Jojo” Neporo was also briefly interviewed in the article. Steve Woodward (Jim’s cameraman) was the chief translator, but Jim Marbrook also translated bits. (Only written story published on PS/PMW)

Daniel Drageset (2013, October 22 and July 10).Two interviews with Emani Fakaotimanava-Lui and his wife TaniRose Fakaotimanava-Lui, about development of internet on Niue and starting up and running a global business from Niue. (Audio story published on PS/PMW)

Daniel Drageset (2013, October 9). Interview with Jim Marbrook, documentary film-maker and AUT University lecturer, on his upcoming documentary Cap Bocage about the fight over the Cap Bocage mine in New Caledonia. (Audio story published on PMW/PS)

Daniel Drageset (2013, September 30). Interview with Matai Akauola, newly appointed director of the Media Industry Development Authority (MIDA) in Fiji, about Fiji’s media policies and Australia and New Zealand’s role in the development of Fiji media. (Audio story published on PMW/PS)

Daniel Drageset (2013, September 19). Audio interviews at the launch of the Asia Pacific Human Rights Coalition (APHRC) with interviews of Amanda Brydon of Amnesty International New Zealand (Aotearoa), Kevin McBride, co-founder and co-coordinator of APHRC, and Joan Macdonald of the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF). (Audio story published on PMC/PS)
 
Daniel Drageset (2013, September 2). Interview with Giff Johnson, editor of the Marshall Islands Journal, about the upcoming Pacific Islands Forum in Majuro, Marshall Islands. (Audio story, published on PMW/PS)

Daniel Drageset (2013, August 23). Interview with Kevin Buzzacott, Aboriginal elder and one of the organisers of the West Papua Freedom Flotilla, about the flotilla’s mission and human rights in West Papua. (Audio story, published on PMW/PS)

Daniel Drageset (2013, August 12). Interview with Mata’afa Keni Lesa, editor of the Samoa Observer, about the Samoan Prime Minister’s attacks on the media (and him personally) and the state of media freedom in Samoa at the moment. (Audio story, published on PMW/PS)

Daniel Drageset (2013, July 24). Interview with Sylvia Cadena, project officer of the Information Society Innovation Fund (ISIF) Asia (the regional internet registry for the Asia-Pacific region), about ISIF Asia’s projects and development of internet infrastructure in the Pacific. Interview conducted during the Nethui conference. (Audio story, published on PMW/PS)

Daniel Drageset (2013, July 1). Interview with Giff Johnson, editor of the Marshall Islands Journal, about his new biographical book about his late wife Darlene Keju, an anti-nuclear campaigner. (Audio story, published on PMW/PS)

Daniel Drageset (2013, June 21). Interview with Ricardo Morris, editor of Repúblika magazine, about the removal of a speaker during the University of South Pacific’s (USP) UNESCO World Press Freedom Day event. A written email interview with Peter Lomas, CEO and published of the Fiji Sun, was also conducted for this story. (Audio interview with Ricardo Morris, published on PMW/PS)

Daniel Drageset (2013, May 31). Interview with Tajinder Singh Hayer, film-maker and participant at the Film Raro festival in the Cook Islands, about his film and how he liked working on Rarotonga. (Audio story, published only on PMW)

Daniel Drageset (2013, May 21). Interview with Jason Brown, coordinator for the Pacific Freedom Forum (PFF), about a proposed new ombudsman to bring enhanced accountability and credibility among Pacific news groups. (Audio story, published only on PMW)

Daniel Drageset (2013, May 17). Interview with Bilal Sarwary, Afghan BBC reporter, about media freedom accomplishments in Afghanistan. (Audio story, published on PMW/PS)

Daniel Drageset (2013, May 15). Interview with various moviegoers at the New Zealand premiere of Kon-Tiki, about Norwegian explorer Thor Heyerdahl’s epic voyage on a balsa-wood raft from Peru to French Polynesia. (Audio story, published only on PMW)

Daniel Drageset (2013, May 3 and April 26). Interview with Professor Mark Pearson, lecturer at Griffith University in Brisbane and keynote speaker at AUT University’s UNESCO World Press Freedom Day event on May 3, about media freedom in the Pacific and the importance of supporting media institutions in order to boost press freedom. Two stories were published in the lead-up to the World Press Freedom Day resulting from one interview. (Audio story, published on PMW/PS)

Daniel Drageset (2013, April 23). Interview with Paul Mambrasar, secretary of the Institute for Human Rights Study and Advocacy of Papua (ElsHAM Papua), about the newly launched website Papuans Behind Bars, which details the stories of all political prisoners in West Papua. (Audio story, published on PMW/PS)

Daniel Drageset (2013, April 12: Interview with Alastair Thompson, editor and general manager of Scoop Media and one of the founders of the Scoop Foundation Project, which hopes to give a boost to public interest journalism in New Zealand – about the new project and the media situation in New Zealand at the moment. An audio interview was also conducted with Allison McCulloch, another founder of the project. (Audio story, published on PMW/PS)

Daniel Drageset (2013, April 10). Interview with Professor Hans Henrik Holm, lecturer at the Danish School of Journalism, about the Danish MP Marie Krarup’s racist comments on Maori culture during her visit to Auckland. (Audio story, published on PMW/PS)

Daniel Drageset (2013, March 28). Interview with social justice photographer John Miller, about the importance of his work and the nuclear-free movement. (Audio story, published only on PMW)

Daniel Drageset (2013, March 27 and March 21). Interview with Titi Gabi, co-chair of the Pacific Freedom Forum (PFF), about domestic violence in Papua New Guinea and how media can play a part in limiting that. A separate story was published on March 21 on the same topic. (Audio story, published on PMW/PS)

Daniel Drageset (2013, March 22). Interview with John Pulu, reporter at TVNZ’s Tagata Pasifika, about the opening of the Sir Paul Reeves Building. (Audio story, published only on PMW)
 

2012

Edited books:

Prasad, Mohit (2011/2). Dreadlocks literary journal special edition on Creativity and Climate Change in the Pacific. Suva: University of the South Pacific and Pacific Writing Forum; Auckland: Pacific Media Centre. Contributor and associate editor Dr David Robie.

Refereed journal articles:

Robie, David (2012). Independent journalism in the South Pacific: Two campus-based media case studies in Fiji, New Zealand. Global Media Journal. 6(1): 1-10.

Robie, David (2012). ‘Drugs, guns and gangs’: Case studies on Pacific states and how they deploy NZ media regulators. Pacific Journalism Review, 18(1): 105-127.

Robie, David (2012). Iconic media environmental images of Oceania: Challenging corporate news for solutions. Dreadlocks, 6/7: 25-49.

Conference presentations:

Robie, David (2012). ‘Four Worlds’ news values revisited: A deliberative journalism paradigm for Pacific media. Paper presented at the Media and Democracy Symposium at the University of the South Pacific, Suva, 5/6 September 2012.

Perrottet, Alex (2012). Development journalism and Pacific news values: a case study comparing Vanuatu and New Zealand. Paper presented at the Media and Democracy Symposium at the University of the South Pacific, Suva, 5/6 September 2012.

Robie, David (2012). Peace journalism in the South Pacific: A critical reflexive approach to Timor-Leste and West Papua. Asian Media Information and Communication Centre Conference, Shah Alam, Malaysia (Forthcoming, 11-14 July).

Aslam, Rukhsana (2012). Entering the realms of investigative journalism: a defence case for peace journalism. Paper presented at the Media and Democracy Symposium at the University of the South Pacific, Suva, 5/6 September 2012.

Devere, Heather; and Wilson, Courtney (2012). Peace/conflict journalism in the New Zealand media? Reporting on ‘the Arc of Instability’ in the Pacific. Paper presented at the Media and Democracy Symposium at the University of the South Pacific, Suva, 5/6 September 2012.

Josephi, Beate and Robie, David (2012). The visibility of conflicts as ethical necessity: A West Papua case study. Paper presented at the International Association for Media and Communication Research (IAMCR) conference, Durban, South Africa (15-19 July 2012).

Perrottet, Alex (2012). Pacific media freedom. World Press Freedom Day event, University of the South Pacific, Suva, Fiji, 3-4 May 2012.

Robie, David (2012). Credibility of social media: Trust – should the public believe what they’re told? Presented at the Second Pacific Media Summit, Pacific Harbour, Fiji, 26-30 March 2012.

Robie, David (2012). Peace journalism in the South Pacific: A critical reflexive approach to Timor-Leste and West Papua. Asian Media Information and Communication Centre Conference, Shah Alam, Malaysia (Forthcoming, 11-14 July).

Postgraduate students’ research and project researcher outcomes:

Abplanalp, Karen (2012). ‘Blood money’: A NZ investigative journalism case study. Pacific Journalism Review, 18(1): 128-147.

Korauaba, Taberannang (2012). Media and Climate Change in Kiribati: A case study on journalism in a ‘disappearing nation’. Unpublished Master of Communication Studies (MCS) thesis. Auckland: Auckland University of Technology.

Media outputs:

Deliberative journalism – Article by David Robie, The Fiji Times, 13 September 2012.

Deliberative journalism – a robust approach for the Pacific – Article by David Robie, Pacific Journalism Online, 10 September 1012

Pacific investigative journalism study author calls for more collaboration – Interview with Pacific Journalism Review contributor Shailendra Singh, Pacific Media Watch, 30 June 2012.

West Papua violence escalating amid media’s ‘silent treatment’ – Interview with Pacific Media Watch’s Alex Perrottet on Radio bFM, 25 June 2012.

Kiribati govt must come clean over newspaper investigation – academic – Interview with PMC director Dr David Robie by Radio NZ International, 25 June 2012.

Kiribati newspaper closes amid police probe – Inter5View with PMC director Dr David Robie by Radio Australia, 22 June 2012.

Pacific Media Centre says Kiribati government rtries to muzzle independent paper – Interview with PMC director Dr David Robie by Radio NZ International, 23 May 2012.

Pacific Media Watch praises RNZI for PNG coverage – Interview with Pacific Media Watch’s Alex Perrottet on Radio bFM’ s Southern Cross, 19 April 2012.

‘Peace journalism’ in conflict resolution in the Pacific – Interview with PMC director Dr David Robie by Radio Australia’s Geraldine Coutts, 18 April 2012.

Fiji Television on PIMA Pacific summit – Interview on FT’s Close-Up programme with PMC director Dr David Robie, 17 April 2012.

Peacemaker Kalafi Moala – Analysis in the Fiji Sun by PMC director Dr David Robie, 9 April 2012.

PINA moves on with Moala’s ‘go forward’ plea – Analysis on PACNEWS by PMC director Dr David Robie, 4 April 2012.

PINA summit assessed positively by commentator – Interview by Radio NZ INternational with PMC director Dr David Robie, 3 April 2012.

Tonga’s Moala calls for Pacific media unity – Analysis on Pacific Islands Report by PMC director Dr David Robie, 2 April 2012.

Peacemaker Moala helps bury the hatchet over PINA tensions – Analysis on Cafe Pacific by PMC director Dr David Robie, 2 April 2012.
 

2011

Edited books:

Barnett, S, & O’Rourke, S. (2011). Communication: Organisation and innovation. (3rd ed.). Kuala Lumpur: Pearson.

Papoutsaki, E., McManus, M., and Matbob, P. (Eds.) (2010/11). Communication, Culture and Society in Papua New Guinea: Tu tok wanem? Preface by David Robie. Madang: Divine Word University Press; and Auckland: Pacific Media Centre. ISBN 978-1877314-94-3.

Chapters/sections in books:

O’Rourke, S. & Johnson, R. (2011). Internationalising a media studies degree in Arab Higher Education: A case study arising from an agreement between New Zealand and Oman in  Sabry, T. (Ed).  Arab Cultural Studies, Mapping the Field. London:  IB. Tauris. (Publication in November).

Robie, D. (2011). The campus and the newsroom: Papua New Guinean media in education profile. In Papoutsaki E, McManus M, Matbob (Eds.), Communication, Culture and Society in Papua New Guinea: Yu tok wanem? (pp. 186-198). Madang, PNG: Divine Word University.

Edited journals:
 
Johnson, R., and Robie, D. (2011). MIJT 2010: New investigative journalism strategies. Pacific Journalism Review,  17(1), 254pp. ISSN 1023-9499

Bacon, W., Bonfiglioli, C., and Robie, D. (2011). Media, cultural diversity and community. Pacific Journalism Review, 16(2), 239pp. ISSN 1023-9499

Refereed journal articles:

Cass, P. (2011). ‘Teacher! Teacher! I want “A”, teacher’. Pacific Journalism Review, 17(2):130-147.

Cass, P. (2011). Fr Francis Mihalic and Wantok niuspepa in Papua New Guinea. Pacific Journalism Review, 17(1): 210-226.

Myllylahti, M. and Hope, W. (2011). Global capital and media communication ownership in New Zealand. Pacific Journalism Review, 17(2): 188-209.

Perrottet, A., and Robie, D. (2011). Pacific media freedom 2011: A status report. Pacific Journalism Review, 17(2): 148-186.

O’Rourke, S. ( 2011).  Teaching Journalism in Oman: Reflections after the Arab Spring. Pacific Journalism Review .17 (1) : 109- 129.
 
O’Rourke, S. (2011 ). Curriculum development for Oman 2006 – 2011: Implications for off-shore education and challenges for intercultural communications within New Zealand. New Zealand Communication Journal Special edition: Intercultural Communication. (12)1: 42 – 56.

Rankine, Jenny ; Barnes, Angela Moewaka; Borell, Belinda; McCreanor, Timothy; Nairn, Raymond; and Gregory, Amanda. (2011). Suburban Newspapers’ reporting of Māori news. Pacific Journalism Review, 17(2): 50-71.

Robie, D. (2011). Conflict reporting in the South Pacific: Why peace journalism has a chance. The Journal of Pacific Studies, 32(2).

Robie, D. (2011). Iconic media environmental images of Oceania: Challenging corporate news for solutions. Dreadlocks. v6/7. Incorporating the Proceedings of Oceans, Islands and Skies – Oceanic Conference on Creativity and Climate Change, Suva, Fiji, September 2010. Forthcoming.

Refereed conference papers:

Aslam, R. (2011). The role of peace journalism in international conflicts. Presented at the New Zealand Political Studies Association Conference, University of Otago, 30 November-2 December 2011.

Robie, D. (2011). Independent journalism in the South Pacific: Two campus-based media case studies in Fiji and New Zealand. Presented at the 20th AMIC annual conference: Taking stock of media and communication studies: The challenges and opportunities of globalisation, new media and the rise of Asia, Hyderabad, India, 24-27 June 2011.

Robie, D. (2011). ‘Drugs, guns and gangs’ and a growing Pacific state tendency to deploy NZ media regulators to stifle investigative reportage. Presented at the “Back to the source” Investigative journalism conference, University of Technology, Sydney, 16-17 September 2011.

Robie, D. (2011). Creative Commons and a Pacific media ‘hub’: A news education model amid crisis, Journalism Education Association of Australia (JEAA) conference in Adelaide, South Australia, 28-30 November 2011.

Postgraduate students’ research and project researcher outcomes:

Abplanalp, K. (2011, December). Blood Money, Metro magazine. [Asia-Pacific Journalism postgraduate investigative assignment].

Aslam, R. (2011). Peace journalism: A paradigm shift in traditional media approach. Pacific Journalism Review, 17(1): 119-139.

Manning, B. S. (2011). Security intelligence and the public interest: An examination into how keeping security intelligence and classified information secret, and privy only to a state’s executive and aligned operational agencies, affects the function of a modern democracy. An exegesis presented as a companion document attached to the creative component documentary, Behind The Shroud, for a Master of Communication Studies degree at AUT University.

Miller, J. (2011). Ngatihine forestry development and the media: A case study. Pacific Journalism Review, 17(1): 175-193.

Perrottet, A., and Robie, D. (2011). Pacific media freedom 2011: A status report. Pacific Journalism Review, 17(2): 148-186.

Singh, R. (2011). The 2000 Speight coup in Fiji: An analysis of the role of The Fiji Times and the impact of partisan media. Thesis for a Master of Communication Studies degree at AUT University.

Media outputs:

Pacific Journalism Review launches new website – Interview with PMC director Dr David Robie by Radio Australia’s Geraldine Coutts, 20 December 2011.

Radio NZ’s MediawatchInterview with Pacific Media Watch project editor Alex Perrottet by Jeremy Rose, 11 December 2011.

Academic condemns lack of NZ coverage of West Papua crisis – Interview with PMC director Dr David Robie in Adelaide, 4 December 2011.

New Zealand Herald op-ed article on the British phone-hacking inquiry – Alex Perrottet of Pacific Media Watch, 2 December 2011.

Blood Money, investigative article on the Freeport mine in Metro magazine, December 2011 [Asia-Pacific Journalism assignment].

Vanuatu media black spot – interview with PMW’s Alex Perrottet by Radio Australia’s Pacific Beat presenter Geraldene Coutts, 16 November 2011.

The Australian’s Media – Interview with PMC director Dr David Robie and profile of Pacific Journalism Review media freedom report, 14 November 2011.

Papua a media black spot – article in New Matilda by Alex Perrottet and David Robie, 24 October 2011.

Radio Australia’s Pacific Beat – Interview with PMC director Dr David Robie by Geraldene Coutts, 17 October 2011

Peace journalism researcher warns on turmoil repercussions in Pakistan – Interview with doctoral candidate Rukhsana Aslam by Radio Australia, 24 May 2011.

Pacific media condemn minister ‘and his thugs’ for attack on Daily Post – Interview with PMC director Dr David Robie, 5 March 2011

2010

Edited journals:
 
Bacon, W.,  Robie, D., and Samson, A. (2010). Reporting Wars: The ongoing challenges. Pacific Journalism Review,  16(1), 234pp. ISSN 1023-9499

Hadlow, M., Mackinnon, M., and Robie, D. (2010). UNESCO WPFD: Media freedom in Oceania. Pacific Journalism Review, 16(2), 232pp. ISSN 1023-9499

Chapters/sections in books:
 
Robie, D. (2010). Pacific reports. In Karlekar, K., Freedom of the Press 2010: A Global Survey of Media Independence. [Pacific Contributor]. New York: Freedom House.

Robie, D. (2010/11). Media literacies in Papua New Guinean newsrooms: The campus and the deadline. In Papoutsaki, E., McManus, M., and Matbob, P. (Eds.). Communication, Culture and Society in Papua New Guinea: Tu tok wanem? Madang: Divine Word University Press; and Auckland: Pacific Media Centre. ISBN 978-1877314-94-3

Robie, D. (2010). Barbouzes, bullets and beat-ups: South Pacific media realities. In Sun, W. (ed). Media, Policies and Cultures in the Asia-Pacific Region. London: Routledge.

Commissioned reports for external body:

Robie, D. (2010). Country reports on Fiji, NZ, Samoa and Tonga. RSF Media Freedom Report Index 2010. Paris: Reporters sans frontieres.
 
Refereed journal articles:
 
Cullen, T. and Callaghan, R. (2010). Reporting HIV in Papua New Guinea: Trends and omissions from 2000 to 2010. Pacific Journalism Review, 16(2): 163-177.

Oosterman, A. (2010).  New Zealand war correspondence before 1915. Pacific Journalism Review, 16(1): 133-152.

Robie, D. (2010). Media under fire: Pacific ‘self-determination’ insurgencies and the student press. Pacific Journalism Review, ISSN 1023-9499, 16(1): 60-64. ISSN 1728-7456

Robie, D. (2010). Pacific freedom of the press: Case studies in independent campus-based media models. Pacific Journalism Review, ISSN 1023-9499, 16(2): 99-126.

Robie, D. (2010). Conflict reporting in the South Pacific: Why peace journalism has a chance. The Journal of Pacific Studies, ISSN 1011-3029, Vol 32(2):

Singh, S. (2010). Life under Decree No. 29 of 2010. Pacific Journalism Review, 16(2): 147-162.

Vikilani, S. (2010). Media freedom and state control in Tonga. Pacific Journalism Review, 16(2): 62-80.

Refereed conference papers:

Aslam, R. (2010). Challenges and dangers in practising effective journalism. Paper presented at the Media, Investigative Journalism and Technology Conference at AUT University, December 4/5.

Manning, S. (2010). Political documentary used as a vehicle to communicate a contemporary reality. Paper presented at the Media, Investigative Journalism and Technology Conference at AUT University, December 4/5.

Marat, D., Papoutsaki, E., Latu, S, Aumua, L., Talakai, M., Sun, K. (2010). Akoaga – Retention & achievement in the New Zealand tertiary sector: Perspectives of students & parents from Pasifika communities on efficacy, agency & success. Presentation at the 34th Annual Pacific Islands Studies Conference University of Hawaii Celebrating connections: 60 years of Pacific Studies 4-6 November 2010.

Marbrook, J. (2010). Cap Bocage: exploring concepts of legitimacy and militancy in local environmental protest in New Caledonia. Paper presented at the Media, Investigative Journalism and Technology Conference at AUT University, December 4/5.

Miller, J., and Peters, G. (2010). Seeing the wood for the trees:  media coverage of the 1970s Ngatihine Forestry Block  – a case study. Paper presented at the Media, Investigative Journalism and Technology Conference at AUT University, December 4/5.

Robie, D. (2010). Pacific freedom of the press: Case studies in campus-based media models. Keynote paper presented as UNESCO World Press Freedom Day University of Queensland Lecture Series, University of Queensland, April 30.

Robie, D. (2010). Censorship and the legacy of independent campus-based publishers in Oceania. Paper presented at the Journalism Education Association of Australia (JEAA) conference at the University of Technology, Sydney, November 24.

Singh, T. R. (2010). The 2000 Speight coup in Fiji: An analysis of the role of The Fiji Times and the impact of partisan media. Paper presented at the Journalism Education Association of Australia (JEAA) conference at the University of Technology, Sydney, November 24. [Winner of the JEAA Pacific Scholarship].

Singh, T. R. (2010). Coup culture in Fiji: An analysis 1987 to 2006 from an investigative journalism perspective. Paper presented at the Media, Investigative Journalism and Technology (2010) conference at AUT University, 4/5 December 2010.

Thomas, V., Papoutsaki, E., Eggins, J. (2010). Visual Dialogues, Community Action & Social Change:  a South Pacific Islands HIV/AIDS project application. AMIC 19th Annual Conference Technology and Culture: Communication Connectors and Dividers, 21-23 June 2010.

Thomas, V., Mel, M., Papoutsaki, E.. (2010). Exploring local methodologies through creative collaborations with Pacific communities. AAAPS 3rd annual conference, Oceanic Transformations. Melbourne: Victoria University, Melbourne, 8-11 April 2010.

Research project:

KOMUNITI TOK PIKSA ? Integrating Papua New Guinean Highland narratives into visual HIV/ AIDS prevention and education material. Role:  Chief Investigator – Research Capacity Expert. 2 year Project Funded by the PNG National HIV/AIDS Council and AusAID PNG. Project hosting institutions: Centre for Health Communication, University of Technology Sydney & University of Goroka, PNG

Media outputs:

Robie, D. (2010, April 10). Fiji media decree draconian and punitive. PMC Online.
www.pmc.aut.ac.nz/articles/draft-fiji-media-decree-draconian-and-punitive

Robie, D. (2010, April 16). Fiji media fights on for free press. New Zealand Herald,
www.nzherald.co.nz/world/news/article.cfm?c_id=2&objectid=10638784

Robie, D. (2010, May/June). Fiji censorship by ‘legal camouflage’. The Walkley Magazine.www.pmc.aut.ac.nz/articles/fiji-censorship-legal-camouflage

Robie, (2010, October/November). The darker side of paradise. The Walkley Magazine.
www.pmc.aut.ac.nz/articles/darker-side-paradise

PANPA Bulletin  (2010, March) – Fiji to issue new media decree. Interview with David Robie on media censorship in Fiji.

Reportage (2010, March 16). Crowd pleasers – A new way to fund journalism. [Interview with David Robie]

TVNZ (2010, April 13). Barbara Dreaver interview with David Robie about the Fiji Media Industry Development Decree.
http://tvnz.co.nz/national-news/fiji-media-digests-tough-crackdown-3453287

95bFM (2010, April 13). Will Pollard interview with David Robie on the Fiji Media Industry Decree.
http://pacific.scoop.co.nz/2010/04/95bfm-dr-david-robie-analyses-fijis-media-decree/

TVNZ7 (2010, April 15). Media 7 interview by Russell Brown with David Robie, Barbara Dreaver and Tim Pankhurst on the Fiji Media Industry Development Decree. (Series 4, Ep 7, Pt 1). www.youtube.com/watch?v=7hpkKvW9d9Y

Radio NZ Mediawatch (2010, April 18). Jeremy Rose interview with David Robie on Media Fiji Media Industry Development Decree.
http://static.radionz.net.nz/assets/audio_item/0020/2270162/mwatch-20100418-0905-Mediawatch_for_18_April_2010-m048.asx

Fiji Sun (2010, September 17). Journalists welcome Fiji Times sale. [Interview with David Robie in Fiji]
www.fijisun.com.fj/main_page/view.asp?id=46385

Radio NZ Mediawatch (2010, October 3). Fiji’s oldest newspaper under new management. [Interview with David Robie].
http://static.radionz.net.nz/assets/audio_item/0006/2417442/mwatch-20101003-0910-Mediawatch_for_03_October_2010-m048.asx

Radio NZ Mediawatch (2010, November 8). Colin Peacock interviews PMC’s Pacific Media Watch editor Alex Perrottet on the “door stopping” controversy about the Samoan Prime Minister and the TV3 Campbell Live programme.  http://static.radionz.net.nz/assets/audio_item/0008/2429909/mwatch-20101107-0906-Mediawatch_for_7_November_2010-m048.asx

Radio NZ Mediawatch (2010, December 6). Colin Peacock interviews Kunda Dixit on investigative journalism. [MIJT 2010 Conference at AUT].
http://static.radionz.net.nz/assets/audio_item/0010/2442475/mwatch-20101205-0910-Mediawatch_for_5_December_2010-m048.asx
 

MIL OSI

MIL OSI

Timor-Leste Press Council condemns ‘crime’ against public broadcaster

Source: Dr David Robie – Café Pacific – Analysis-Reportage:

Timor-Leste Press Council president Virgílio Guterres (second from right) addresses the media briefing
at the council’s office in Dili. Image: TLPC

From Pacific Media Watch in Dili

Timor-Leste’s Press Council (TLPC) has strongly condemned political interference in the country’s public broadcasting service (RTTL) newsroom where political-appointed advisers for the president of RTTL have interfered in its coverage.

During a press conference at the TLPC’s offices in Dili, chairperson Virgílio Guterres said it was the first political interference in RTTL’s newsroom since country’s restoration of independence.

“Press Council follows and is informed that after the recent change to the leadership of RTTL, bad interference in the newsroom has been happening. That is why the Press Council is concerned,” he said.

READ MORE: Bob Howarth’s report on Asia-Pacific united Press Councils

The condemnation was about political interference, but there was also physical interference in that certain advisors went in to the newsroom asking to change the news coverage,” Guterres told journalists.

It was a serious problem, he said, and an “act of crime” against the public as the political-appointed advisor had seized the authority of the editor-in-chief to remove the content of news stories.

“It is a crime against journalism as these people have seized the power of the editor-in-chief for exercising their political interests.

“The Press Council is concerned about this situation, and would like to take the opportunity to convey our concerns to the public as well also to the government bodies to look into this situation,” he said.

Sacking threat
The Press Council also condemned the head of the Office of the Secretary of State for Social Communication (SECOMS), Julio Goncalves, as he had threatened to sack RTTL journalist Constancio Vieira from his job, following his comments on freedom expression and freedom of the press on his social media account.

In an interview with Timorese media, which was also broadcast by the country’s public radio, the president of RTTL Francisco “Gari” da Silva, said he had received an official letter from the Press Council, protesting against the newsroom interference.

“We have received a protest letter from the Press Council and we held a meeting discussing the issue, which regard to the news stories that RTTL broadcast. We do appreciate the Press Council’s concerns and hope we will make self-improvements,” he told public radio.

The political interference in RTTL’s newsroom happened in the country’s broadcasting service after the former president Gil da Costa Naldo Rey, was sacked from his post by the new government, following a controversial audit that had been conducted, indicating that there were some “irregularities”.

Francisco da Silva Gari was the one who in charge of the Secretary of State for Social Communication-led audit. Weeks later he was appointed to replace Gil da Costa Naldo Rei as new president of RTTL.

Timor-Leste is ranked 95th in the Reporters Sans Frontiers (RSF) annual World Press Freedom Index.

MIL OSI

Grattan on Friday: Liberals stir the culture war pot but who’s listening?

Source: The Conversation (Au and NZ) – By Michelle Grattan, Professorial Fellow, University of Canberra

As a new round of the culture wars bubbles, West Australian Liberal senator Dean Smith has urged that we should legislate to “protect” the January 26 date of Australia Day.

Smith came to national prominence as one of the small coterie of Liberals who forced the Turnbull government to act on same-sex marriage. He advances his causes with moderation and respect, and always warrants a hearing. But in this instance he lacks a compelling case.

Australia Day’s date – which marks the First Fleet’s landing – has become increasingly contentious in recent years, opposed by Indigenous and other critics on the grounds that it is really “invasion day”.

If we were starting again, I think it would be better to have Australia Day on January 1, to celebrate the birth of the Commonwealth.

But given the present date has strong community support, there is not a compelling case for change. Equally, there isn’t a case to bake in the current date either. (This date, incidentally, only appears in legislation as a public holiday)

In an opinion piece in Thursday’s Australian Smith writes that “Australia Day remains unprotected and could easily fall victim to the whims of a political party or special interest lobby group interested in political point-scoring rather than celebrating the virtues of a contemporary and forward-looking Australia.”

He proposes legislation to “guarantee that January 26 ceases to be Australia Day only after the Australian people have been consulted directly, and that to change the date of Australia Day an alternative date must be submitted to every Australian elector.”

In reality, the January 26 date won’t “fall victim” to “whims”. No government would change it lightly.

An alteration would only happen if there was evidence of a big shift in community sentiment. Maybe that will come in future years – if it does, so be it.

It is not on the cards any time soon. Bill Shorten remains committed to January 26.

The Coalition has been using the (annual) debate about Australia Day as political ammunition.

This became a little messy, however, because Warren Mundine, Scott Morrison’s star candidate for the marginal NSW seat of Gilmore, has been a forthright advocate of moving Australia Day to January 1.


Read more: View from The Hill: Morrison’s Gilmore candidate is the man who’s been everywhere


Mundine wrote on January 24, 2017: “The 26th of January is the wrong day to celebrate Australia Day.

“Firstly, Australia wasn’t founded on January 26, 1788. It was founded on January 1, 1901 …

“Secondly, the tension between commemorating British conquest on the one hand and celebrating Australian identity and independence on the other isn’t going away. This isn’t a recent tension drummed up by Lefties. It’s always been there, even before anyone cared about what indigenous people think.”

Despite his new status Mundine is sticking to his view – he’s just saying now that this is not a priority issue for him. “I’ve got 100 different things in front of that, before I even get to that stage,” he told a news conference as he stood beside his leader on Wednesday.

He declines to be drawn on his position if he were elected and faced a Smith private member’s bill. He told The Conversation, “I’ll jump that hurdle when I get there. At the moment I’m fighting a tough battle to win the seat”.

As this Australia Day approached Morrison ramped up the nationalistic and culture war rhetoric in general, and accompanied it with some controversial actions.

The Liberal party tweeted, “The Government is taking action to protect Australia Day from activists.”

The government proposes to force local councils to hold citizenship ceremonies on Australia Day, after the refusal of some to do so. Councils defying the edict would not be allowed to conduct them at all.

This has come with a recommended dress code for these occasions – no thongs or board shorts. “I’m a prime minister for standards,” declared Morrison, to something of a national horse laugh.

Councils have been given to the end of next month to provide feedback.

Morrison has struggled to differentiate himself from Shorten over Australia Day, since they are at one about the date.

“It’s not good enough to say that you just won’t change it. You’ve got to stand up for it and I’m standing up for it, ” he declared. “Bill Shorten will let it fade away”. It’s true the level of rhetoric around Australia Day has varied over the years but the notion of it just “fading away” is ridiculous.

This week the debate moved on to Captain Cook, with Morrison’s announcement of $6.7 million for the Endeavour replica to circumnavigate Australia to mark next year’s 250th anniversary of Cook’s arrival and take the story of Cook to 39 communities across the country. (The money is from $48.7 million set aside earlier to mark the anniversary.)

Morrison – who was visiting Cooktown in North Queensland – was described by Shorten as having a “bizarre Captain Cook fetish”. (Liberal MP Warren Entsch recalls Morrison’s special interest in Cook from his days in tourism. In parliament Morrison happens to represent the seat of Cook.)

Morrison – who argues that the narrative of Cook can be used as one pillar for Indigenous reconciliation – hit back by accusing Shorten of “sneering at Australia’s history”, declaring “you can’t trust this guy on this stuff.”

He added that “political correctness … is raising kids in our country today to despise our history”, and alleged that Shorten wanted to “feed into that”.

For some in the right of the Liberal party, the culture and history wars are a continuing preoccupation.

But these issues hover on the fringe of politics in this election year, even if they do resonate in Hansonland and similar territory.

It mightn’t have been front and centre, but the battle that’s been going on this week between treasurer Josh Frydenberg and his shadow Chris Bowen about the economy, tax policy and the like is a lot more relevant to most voters than the culture wars and political correctness.

ref. Grattan on Friday: Liberals stir the culture war pot but who’s listening? – http://theconversation.com/grattan-on-friday-liberals-stir-the-culture-war-pot-but-whos-listening-110445

MIL Analysis+Reportage – EveningReport.NZ

Hidden women of history: Mary Jane Cain, land rights activist, matriarch and community builder

Source: The Conversation (Au and NZ) – By Heidi Norman, Professor, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, University of Technology Sydney

For the communities of Coonabarabran in New South Wales and her grasslands Gomeroi people, Mary Jane Cain is a revered figure. Cain lived from 1844 to 1929. In the late 1880s, she successfully advocated for Aboriginal land security – a rare coup for an Aboriginal woman at the time. In 1920, she penned a 23-page manuscript detailing her life, her observations of new land owners and their workers, and a list of Gomeroi words.

She was born when frontier violence was at its zenith. Decades long guerrilla warfare had raged as the Gomeroi people resisted pastoral invasion and violent recriminations. Some estimate as few as 10% of the Aboriginal populations survived these killing times.

Mary Jane Cain’s mother, Jinnie Griffin, a “full blood” whose life likely spanned pre and post-contact, had married an Irishman, Eugene Griffin. They moved between Mudgee and Coonabarabran where they operated, for a time, as travelling sales people. After being held up by bushrangers, they spent decades working on pastoral runs – Jinnie as a shepherd and Eugene as a dairyman. At the time of Mary Jane’s birth, they’d been working on Toorawindi property for some years.

The advent of gold mining in 1852 marked a significant shift on the pastoral frontier. As Cain wrote in her 1920 manuscript, all the white people working on one station “left to go mining”. Renewed interest in Aboriginal people as shepherds and stock workers contributed to an easing in frontier violence on Gomeroi lands. This created opportunities for Aboriginal families to get back to their country, but in very different circumstances – as workers, generally without pay.

A page of Mary Jane Cain’s hand written manuscript. State Library of NSW.

By the 1880s Cain had begun agitating for Aboriginal land rights. The 1890s depression caused a further wave of displacement of Aboriginal workers. In this context, the Aboriginal Protection Board emerged, partly in response to rising numbers of Aboriginal people now relegated to the fringes of towns. The board introduced ways to control Aboriginal populations including containment on reserves.

Mary Jane had married Aboriginal stockman Joe Cain in 1865 at Weetalabah station, where they were both living and working, in the home’s “best parlour”. By the 1880s she was living closer to town and shepherded her goats to the mountains and back each day. Her husband Joe became unwell and as she wrote to the Crown, she needed to secure land to support him and her nine children. She petitioned for land at Forky Mountain, about six miles from Coonabarabran, where she could run her goats.


Read more: Hidden women of history: Ruby Lindsay, one of Australia’s first female graphic designers


The politics of land

In February 1892, Cain secured 400 acres. Further land grants in 1902, 1906 and 1911 saw her recover 600 acres that became home to displaced Aboriginal families up until the late 1950s. These families made homes from kerosene tins lined with glued sheets of newspaper, grew vegies, milked their cows, hosted pantomimes and lived lives recalled with enormous fondness. Over this site, Mary Jane Cain was Queen.

Cain’s grandchildren all recalled “multiple letters” from Cain addressed “to the Queen” (Victoria) requesting the land at Forky Mountain and her trips to Sydney to meet with government officials to petition for her land. Her descendants emphasised that Queen Victoria granted Cain land to manage as a place “for the dark people to live on”.

Mary Jane Cain, right, and grandsons George and James. The sun dancin’ : people and place in Coonabarabran (Aboriginal Studies Press, 1994).

While Aboriginal reserves and missions are often viewed as sites of segregation and genocidal violence, Mary Jane Cain’s story highlights the economic, social and political context that saw reserves, at least initially, self-selected and defended by Aboriginal families; where Aboriginal worlds survived and where political organisation occurred.

In NSW, of the 85 Aboriginal reserves created in the period 1885 to 1895 more than half (47) were initiated by Aboriginal families. The new interest in taking up reserves coincided with a downturn in the two dominant economies – pastoralism and gold mining. Land likely represented an option for Aboriginal security in the wake of decades of colonial violence and disease that caused loss of land, people and livelihood.


Read more: Hidden women of history: Elsie Masson, photographer, writer, intrepid traveller


‘Queen Mary Jane’

Cain’s grandchildren, Julia and Violet Robinson, Ethel Sutherland, Joe Cain and Emily Chatfield share generous and proud stories of “Queen” Mary Jane: she was a great cook, hand stitched marvellous outfits from hessian and old sugar bags and ran a large, immaculately scrubbed, loving home.

They loved her dearly and worked hard to fetch her goats from the mountains; they say she dressed beautifully and descriptions of her “sharp features” suggest they thought her beautiful. She was generous and kind, loaned money to those in need, and welcomed all to Burra Bee Dee (as the Aboriginal reserve was known from 1912). She was Queen of the reserve and Queen in the eyes of her family.

“Queen” was clearly a title Mary Jane was comfortable with: her 1920 manuscript is annotated at page 23 “by M.J. Cain, Queen 1920”. Available studio photos show a regal figure and flanked by her grandsons in military uniform, her own clothing and stature match this formal authority.

Visiting missionaries to Burra Bee Dee in 1909 were also reminded and duly acknowledged her Queen status. They fondly reported on the performances, poetry recital, dancing and the singing, at the end of a long evening, of God Save the King. Mary Jane Cain implored a further and final recital in her honour: God Save the Queen. They obliged.

She also held a powerful place in white society. After her death in 1929, the Coonabarabran Times described Mary Jane as being,

known and loved by all from a very great distance round this district and outside it … and a word against her, … would have evoked the undying hostility from the oldest and most respected families of the North Western slopes and Central West.


Read more: Hidden women of history: Hop Lin Jong, a Chinese immigrant in the early days of White Australia


Cain’s keen sense of justice is evident in one entry in her 1920 manuscript where she refers to organising a petition in 1864 “which everyone signed” in defence of two brothers and “a young [‘half caste’] man … whom they hired” who had been wrongly arrested and charged for cattle stealing.

She writes that: “I presented the petition to Thomas Gordon Danger who was at that time member of Parliament”, which had the effect of reducing their sentence and “them liberated at five years”.

Mary Jane Cain Bridge over the Castlereagh River in NSW. Wikimedia Commons

Aboriginal people negotiated the rapid change to their worlds as the grasslands country came to be intensively farmed. At Burra Bee Dee and through the oral history of Mary Jane Cain’s descendants we hear the stories of matriarchs who acquired the skills of the new world – literacy, shepherding and stock work, knowledge of political systems and how to effect change – and who built ways to sustain Aboriginal worlds in dramatically altered circumstances.

Today, after several years of careful community work, the history of Burra Bee Dee is beautifully documented with signage and photos detailing where families lived. The adjacent cemetery is a site of return for many generations to come. The bridge over the Castlereagh river bears Mary Jane’s name, the local rotary club has installed a plaque in her honour and her life has inspired an art exhibition. Still, the story of this matriarch and queen to her people deserves to be more widely told.

Professor Heidi Norman is a descendant of the Gomeroi people. Her Nan’s uncle (Charles Ruttley) married Mary Jane’s daughter (Eliza Josephine).

ref. Hidden women of history: Mary Jane Cain, land rights activist, matriarch and community builder – http://theconversation.com/hidden-women-of-history-mary-jane-cain-land-rights-activist-matriarch-and-community-builder-110186

MIL Analysis+Reportage – EveningReport.NZ

Throw a sea cucumber on the barbie: Australia’s trade history really is something to celebrate

Source: The Conversation (Au and NZ) – By Tim Harcourt, J.W. Nevile Fellow in Economics, UNSW

The sea cucumber is a marine animal that has a leathery skin but soft body. Its shape and size resembles a cucumber. In Australia we commonly call it trepang, adopted from a Malayan word. It was Australia’s first export to Asia, where it is regarded as delicacy, particularly in Chinese cuisine.

There is evidence fishermen from Makassar, on what is now the Indonesian island of Sulawesi, were visiting the coast of what is now Arnhem Land to collect sea cucumbers as early as the mid-1600s to sell to Chinese merchants. The fishermen camped on the beach to boil and dry their caught trepang, and exchanged goods with the local Indigenous tribes.


Read more: Long before Europeans, traders came here from the north and art tells the story


Through the lens of trade, therefore, the story of modern Australia, a nation interacting with the global economy, begins long before January 26, 1788.

There are many debates that surround Australia Day. But we can all celebrate our history of trade. Like any history, there are episodes of engagement we can’t admire or be proud of. But on the whole, what began with seafood trade on the coast of Arnhem Land has proven a remarkable success.

Arrivals, departures, department stores

Two of Hong Kong’s most iconic department stores provide another example of historic interaction with Asia.

Throughout the 19th century large numbers of Chinese, particularly Cantonese, migrated to Australia’s goldfields. As in any gold rush, it was those who ended up selling supplies that usually prospered more than the prospectors (the 19th century equivalents of Atlassian). In Victoria, Chinese merchants became prominent in the development of retail sectors in Ballarat and Bendigo.

Some Chinese migrants who opened stores in Australia eventually returned to China, and took what they had learned with them.

A Sincere store in Mongkok, Hong Kong. Wikimedia, CC BY-NC-SA

One of those was Ma Ying Piu, who in 1990 does he mean 1890? opened Hong Kong’s first Chinese-owned department store, called Sincere. The store is said to have been inspired by David Jones in Sydney.

Hong Kong’s second Chinese-owned department store, Wing On, was started by brothers Kwok Lok and Kwok Chuen, who returned to China from Australia in 1907. Both businesses opened branches in Shanghai and became two of the “four great department stores of China”.

Such entrepreneurial spirit from around the world enabled the separate Australian colonies to boom for much of the 19th century. Admittedly some paid a heavy price (convicts and Indigenous people treated like slaves, for example). But great economic growth was achieved, as economic historian Ian McLean points out in Why Australia Prospered, without a national government or “many of the institutions and sources of advice now regarded as essential for macroeconomic management”, such as trained economists.

The long march to the Asian century

Colonial governments ran trade missions to China, South East Asia and Japan in the 19th century. After federation in 1901, the Commonwealth government set up trade offices in Shanghai, Tokyo and Batavia (Jakarta) before the interruption of World War II. In the post-war era there have been “four waves” of Asian engagement.

The first three were: the Japan-Australia Commerce agreement in 1957; Gough Whitlam’s recognition of China in 1971; and the Hawke-Keating economic reforms between 1983 and 1996.

The fourth wave is the Asian Century. It began after Australia survived the Asian Financial Crisis of 1997-99 and realised its future did lie in Asia.

To get to that point was a long process. Paul Keating might have been the prime minister who most enthusiastically spruiked engagement with Asia, but he was certainly not the first to advocate closer ties.

That was then, and this is now

So that’s some of our history. What about now?

There are many contemporary things we can be cheerful (and proud about) in 2019 that echo our history.

We can be very pleased about successful Indigenous exporters and entrepreneurs – the successors of our first traders from Arnhem Land.

Think of Ros and John Moriarty of Balarinji, the design agency that has developed all of the motifs used by Qantas in its Flying Art series.

Balarinji oversaw translating Emily Kame Kngwarreye’s 1991 painting ‘Yam Dreaming’ for application on a Qantas jet. Qantas

Or Peter Cooley, who founded Blak Markets to provide economic development opportunities to Indigenous people. (He also hosts his own business show.)

Or David Williams and the members of the Bangarra dance company.

At my business school at the University of NSW a new generation of Indigenous business students have just completed summer school. I am hopeful many will become our business stars of tomorrow.

Along with homegrown talent, Australia has been blessed by waves of immigrants rich in the same entrepreneurial spirit that enabled Chinese merchants to prosper despite the racism of the 19th century.

From the first fleet, we’ve had English, Scots and Irish seeking freedom from poverty and persecution. We’ve had East European Jews, Vietnamese Buddhists, Lebanese Christians and Afghan Muslims fleeing persecution and war.

About one in four Australians were born overseas, but they represent one in every two exporters, and two out of every three entrepreneurs. Immigration has been a good story for Australia in terms of trade and entrepreneurial talent.


Read more: How Australian cities are adapting to the Asian Century


The books Why Nations Fail and Why Australia Prospered show Australia has developed much more successful economic institutions (such as property rights) and political institutions (such as democratic rights) than other nations with similar natural resources, agricultural endowments and increases in human capital through immigration.

This is partially due to our successful record as a trading nation.

No nation is perfect. They all have their failures and aspects of their history not to be proud of. But the things we have gotten right are worth remembering.

So even if you throw a shrimp on the barbie, at least remember the sea cucumber.

ref. Throw a sea cucumber on the barbie: Australia’s trade history really is something to celebrate – http://theconversation.com/throw-a-sea-cucumber-on-the-barbie-australias-trade-history-really-is-something-to-celebrate-110266

MIL Analysis+Reportage – EveningReport.NZ

The stubborn high-pressure system behind Australia’s record heatwaves

Source: The Conversation (Au and NZ) – By Steve Turton, Adjunct Professor of Environmental Geography, CQUniversity Australia

If you think the weather this month has been like Groundhog Day (albeit much hotter), you’d probably be right! Much like a stuck record, weather systems seem to have stalled over most of the country.

Brisbane residents are questioning the lack of rain, storms and heat. Darwin has just endured its second-latest monsoon onset on record after weeks of heat and humidity. Interior towns and cities have experienced significantly hot weather with a number of new maximum and minimum temperature records broken, along with records for consecutive days over 35℃.


Read more: Coastal seas around New Zealand are heading into a marine heatwave, again


Perth has largely escaped the heat so far this summer, while Sydney and Hobart have had a mixed bag. Coastal sea breezes have tempered conditions in the south and southeast of the continent. However, heatwaves are forecast for Melbourne and much of the southeast, with the arrival of strong, hot northerly winds. This will also bring extreme or severe fire weather conditions in many areas, including Tasmania. Adelaide, meanwhile, has sweltered through the hottest day on record for any Australian capital.

Bureau of Meteorology

These weather patterns across the country are largely due to a stubborn blocking high-pressure system that has remained over the Tasman Sea since early January, affecting weather on both sides of the ditch. This type of strong high-pressure system typically forms further south than usual, and remains almost stationary for an extended period, thus blocking the west-to-east progression of weather systems across southern Australia.


Read more: Australia’s ‘deadliest natural hazard’: what’s your heatwave plan?


Sometimes, these blocking highs position themselves over the Great Australian Bight. They can occur at any time of year, and can stay in the Australian region from several days to several weeks.

This schematic shows a ‘blocking high’ preventing weather systems moving across Australia. Understanding Climate Change in Australia report

Winds rotate anticlockwise around high-pressure systems in the Southern Hemisphere. On the northern flank of the blocking high, southeast trade winds have been affecting northern New South Wales and eastern Queensland due to a persistent ridge of high pressure. These winds have been largely cool and dry, with only the far north of Queensland experiencing significant showers. The ridge has kept the inland trough further west over inland NSW and Queensland, preventing normal afternoon thunderstorm activity in the inland, and adding to the woes of the extended drought.

Cool, moist weather from the Southern Ocean is being displaced southeast by the blocking high, resulting in prolonged continental heatwaves and lack of rain. On the western flank of the blocking high, hot dry northerly winds from the arid centre are pushing through South Australia and Victoria, generating heatwave conditions.


Read more: Why we’re hardwired to ignore safety advice during a heatwave


Across the ditch, cooler and drier southerly winds are affecting much of New Zealand. Only the southwest of the South Island is getting any significant rain due to persistent moist westerlies on the southern flank of the blocking high.

An unusually strong ridge of high pressure across Queensland, extending up to Cape York, has kept the monsoon trough north of the continent. This pattern is forecast to change as a deep tropical depression forms in the Gulf of Carpentaria over the coming days and moves south into northern Queensland. Unfortunately, the stubborn ridge of high pressure over central Queensland is likely to block the rain-bearing low from moving much further south over drought-stricken parts of inland Queensland and NSW.


Read more: Coping with heat waves: 5 essential reads


While parts of the country have sweltered, the far southwest of Australia has experienced cooler and wetter than average conditions this month. Cape Leeuwin, Australia’s most southwesterly point, set a 123-year daily rainfall record for January, recording a massive 57mm of rainfall.

Bureau of Meteorology

In the short term, there is no indication that the blocking high will break down or move eastward. Forecasters on both sides of the Tasman expect the pattern to continue until February at least.


Read more: Are heatwaves ‘worsening’ and have ‘hot days’ doubled in Australia in the last 50 years?


ref. The stubborn high-pressure system behind Australia’s record heatwaves – http://theconversation.com/the-stubborn-high-pressure-system-behind-australias-record-heatwaves-110442

MIL Analysis+Reportage – EveningReport.NZ

Why people born between 1966 and 1994 are at greater risk of measles – and what to do about it

Source: The Conversation (Au and NZ) – By Kristine Macartney, Professor, Discipline of Paediatrics and Child Health, University of Sydney

Australia was declared free of measles in 2014. Yet this summer we’ve seen nine cases of measles in New South Wales, and others in Victoria, Western Australia, South Australia and Queensland.

High vaccination rates in Australia means the measles virus doesn’t continuously spread, but we still have “wildfire” outbreaks when travellers bring measles into the country, often unknowingly.

If you haven’t received two doses of measles vaccine, you are at risk of contracting measles.


Read more: What’s behind the sudden rise in measles deaths in Europe?


How can you catch it?

Measles is a highly contagious virus that spreads by touching or breathing in the same air as an infected person. The virus stays alive in the air or on infected surfaces for up to two hours.

An infected person is contagious from the first day of symptoms (fever, cough and runny nose). These general symptoms start about four days before the rash develops, meaning contagious people can spread the virus even before they realise they have measles.

If you’re not immune to the virus, through vaccination or past infection, the chance of becoming ill after being near someone with measles is 90%. Being in the same café, waiting in line at the checkout or flying on the same aeroplane as an infected person could be enough to pick up the disease.

Why is it so dangerous?

Measles causes a fever, cough, and a rash that starts around the hairline and then spreads to the whole body.

The red rash starts around the hairline, then spreads. Phichet Chaiyabin/Shutterstock

It can also cause middle ear infections (otitis media), chest infections (pneumonia), and diarrhoea.

Swelling and inflammation to the brain (encephalitis) occurs in 1 in every 1,000 cases and can lead to permanent brain damage or death. In 2017, 110,000 people died from measles worldwide.

Even after surviving the initial illness, measles can cause a devastating and fatal complication known as subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (inflammation of the brain) many years later.

Why are people in their 20s to 50s more at risk?

To protect yourself against measles, you need two doses of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine.

Children in Australia routinely get this vaccine at 12 and 18 months of age. The second dose is given in combination with the chickenpox vaccine.


Read more: Vaccine program changes protect kids, but with fewer ouches


It’s important to have two doses of MMR vaccine, especially if you haven’t reached your mid-50s. Most people older than this would have been infected with measles before vaccination was routine.

People aged in their 20s to early 50s (those born from 1966 and 1994) are most likely to have only had one dose of MMR vaccine.

While we’ve had the measles vaccine in Australia since 1968, a two-dose program was only introduced in 1992. A brief school-based catch-up program from 1993 to 1994 offered school children a second dose. For those missed out on the school program, catch-up vaccinations were given on an ad-hoc basis via GP clinics.

So not everyone in this age group would have received two doses of the measles vaccine.

If you are this age, you may not be not fully protected against measles. Checking with a GP or immunisation nurse is the best way to be sure. They will check your records, and may do a blood test if you have no proof of immunisation.

Even if you can’t be sure of past vaccinations, it’s still safe to have an extra vaccine. And it’s free for those who need a catch-up dose.

It’s not harmful to have an additional dose of the MMR vaccine. Shutterstock

If you have a child under 12 months of age and you’re heading to a country with measles, an early additional vaccine dose can be given to protect your baby from measles. This ideally should be done at least a month before you travel, to ensure an immune response has time to develop. The routine scheduled doses at 12 months and 18 months will still need to be given later.


Read more: Autism and vaccines: more than half of people in Britain, France, Italy still think there may be a link


What if you’re not protected?

Unfortunately, there is no treatment for measles. Getting adequately vaccinated is the best form of defence against this serious disease.

If you think you’ve been exposed or may be ill from measles, see your GP or call Health Direct or your public health department as soon as possible.

If exposed, but not yet ill, it may not be too late to get a protective vaccine and ensure you don’t spread the disease to others.

If you are unwell, and suspect measles, call ahead to let the clinic know so they can make provisions to keep you away from other patients in the waiting room.

Other, more common, diseases can look like measles, so an urgent specific test (throat swab) must be done to confirm the infection. If measles is proven, public health workers will trace your contacts and your treating doctor will monitor you for complications.

Are we at risk of measles returning in Australia?

Australia currently has all-time high vaccine coverage, with 94.5% of five-year-old children fully immunised at the end of 2017.

By keeping vaccine coverage near or above 95%, herd immunity where there are enough people vaccinated helps prevent measles from spreading to others, including those who cannot be vaccinated.

But in our interconnected world, we must work together to reduce the threat of measles worldwide by boosting immunisation programs in regions with low coverage, including in the Asia Pacific.


Read more: Why it’s hard to run a mass measles campaign in Nigeria’s war-torn states


Measles have resurfaced in some countries due to falls in vaccine coverage from unfounded safety concerns as well as weak health systems. In the first six months of last year, for instance, Europe had 41,000 cases of measles, nearly double the total number of the previous year. This, among other factors, has prompted the World Health Organisation to list vaccine hesitancy as a top ten threat to global health in 2019.

A continued global coordinated effort will be required to maintain elimination and prevent resurgence of this deadly disease in Australia.

ref. Why people born between 1966 and 1994 are at greater risk of measles – and what to do about it – http://theconversation.com/why-people-born-between-1966-and-1994-are-at-greater-risk-of-measles-and-what-to-do-about-it-110167

MIL Analysis+Reportage – EveningReport.NZ