Source: Ara Institute of Canterbury

Ara student Isla Reeves is a serial volunteer.

Most of her life she has been volunteering across numerous organisations including a political party and 298 Youth Health Centre. She has been helping out with various projects for animal welfare organisations and she has been supporting young people to find their way through a poetry collective called Faultline.

Isla Reeves 

For Reeves volunteering means learning and gaining new experiences and finding the right path along the way.

“Being a volunteer helped me to define what I want to do. I didn’t leave high school like some other people not knowing what comes next. I left high school knowing what I was passionate about and where I was headed.”

She is encouraging fellow students to make the most of Student Volunteer Week 2019 and attend the Ara Student Volunteer Expo to figure out how they can get started.

Student Volunteer Week celebrates students making a change in their communities, and connecting young people with opportunities to get involved with volunteering.

“There are so many organisations I’d love to help out with but it is important to choose the right one. I myself had to think carefully about which ones I would enjoy working with the most and what each organisation or charity would get out of me helping them,” said Reeves.

While Reeves never received a cent for her efforts she has been benefiting from her countless hours of unpaid work in other ways.

“If you show people you’re interested in something, if you’re passionate about it and willing to learn they want to offer you more opportunities to do that.”

One experience that stood out to her was being invited to the annual Labour Party conference as a delegate. Reeves was on the youth advisory board at the time and left an impression on the local MP who invited her to come along.

Reeves said for her volunteering means not only giving back to the community but also supporting organisations or services and help them improve what they are doing.

“Nothing in any area will change unless people work together and figure out what needs improving and how they can achieve that. I’d rather do that, volunteer my time and be on lots of advisory boards than hope someone else would.”

“I think it’s cool when organisations realise there is something they can do to better and ask for help from people who are experts or know more about a certain age group,” said Reeves.

So far, Reeves has been able to get jobs in her chosen fields of social work and teaching without a degree, just through her volunteering experiences.

She has decided to take her passion further and study a Bachelor of Maori Language and Indigenous Studies at Ara.

“Eventually I would like to become a teacher. But no matter where I end up I want my Maori language skills to be a big part of my career.”

MIL OSI

Volunteering as an entry step into a dream career

Source: Ara Institute of Canterbury

Ara student Isla Reeves is a serial volunteer.

Most of her life she has been volunteering across numerous organisations including a political party and 298 Youth Health Centre. She has been helping out with various projects for animal welfare organisations and she has been supporting young people to find their way through a poetry collective called Faultline.

Isla Reeves 

For Reeves volunteering means learning and gaining new experiences and finding the right path along the way.

“Being a volunteer helped me to define what I want to do. I didn’t leave high school like some other people not knowing what comes next. I left high school knowing what I was passionate about and where I was headed.”

She is encouraging fellow students to make the most of Student Volunteer Week 2019 and attend the Ara Student Volunteer Expo to figure out how they can get started.

Student Volunteer Week celebrates students making a change in their communities, and connecting young people with opportunities to get involved with volunteering.

“There are so many organisations I’d love to help out with but it is important to choose the right one. I myself had to think carefully about which ones I would enjoy working with the most and what each organisation or charity would get out of me helping them,” said Reeves.

While Reeves never received a cent for her efforts she has been benefiting from her countless hours of unpaid work in other ways.

“If you show people you’re interested in something, if you’re passionate about it and willing to learn they want to offer you more opportunities to do that.”

One experience that stood out to her was being invited to the annual Labour Party conference as a delegate. Reeves was on the youth advisory board at the time and left an impression on the local MP who invited her to come along.

Reeves said for her volunteering means not only giving back to the community but also supporting organisations or services and help them improve what they are doing.

“Nothing in any area will change unless people work together and figure out what needs improving and how they can achieve that. I’d rather do that, volunteer my time and be on lots of advisory boards than hope someone else would.”

“I think it’s cool when organisations realise there is something they can do to better and ask for help from people who are experts or know more about a certain age group,” said Reeves.

So far, Reeves has been able to get jobs in her chosen fields of social work and teaching without a degree, just through her volunteering experiences.

She has decided to take her passion further and study a Bachelor of Maori Language and Indigenous Studies at Ara.

“Eventually I would like to become a teacher. But no matter where I end up I want my Maori language skills to be a big part of my career.”

MIL OSI

Source: Ara Institute of Canterbury

Ara student Isla Reeves is a serial volunteer.

Most of her life she has been volunteering across numerous organisations including a political party and 298 Youth Health Centre. She has been helping out with various projects for animal welfare organisations and she has been supporting young people to find their way through a poetry collective called Faultline.

Isla Reeves 

For Reeves volunteering means learning and gaining new experiences and finding the right path along the way.

“Being a volunteer helped me to define what I want to do. I didn’t leave high school like some other people not knowing what comes next. I left high school knowing what I was passionate about and where I was headed.”

She is encouraging fellow students to make the most of Student Volunteer Week 2019 and attend the Ara Student Volunteer Expo to figure out how they can get started.

Student Volunteer Week celebrates students making a change in their communities, and connecting young people with opportunities to get involved with volunteering.

“There are so many organisations I’d love to help out with but it is important to choose the right one. I myself had to think carefully about which ones I would enjoy working with the most and what each organisation or charity would get out of me helping them,” said Reeves.

While Reeves never received a cent for her efforts she has been benefiting from her countless hours of unpaid work in other ways.

“If you show people you’re interested in something, if you’re passionate about it and willing to learn they want to offer you more opportunities to do that.”

One experience that stood out to her was being invited to the annual Labour Party conference as a delegate. Reeves was on the youth advisory board at the time and left an impression on the local MP who invited her to come along.

Reeves said for her volunteering means not only giving back to the community but also supporting organisations or services and help them improve what they are doing.

“Nothing in any area will change unless people work together and figure out what needs improving and how they can achieve that. I’d rather do that, volunteer my time and be on lots of advisory boards than hope someone else would.”

“I think it’s cool when organisations realise there is something they can do to better and ask for help from people who are experts or know more about a certain age group,” said Reeves.

So far, Reeves has been able to get jobs in her chosen fields of social work and teaching without a degree, just through her volunteering experiences.

She has decided to take her passion further and study a Bachelor of Maori Language and Indigenous Studies at Ara.

“Eventually I would like to become a teacher. But no matter where I end up I want my Maori language skills to be a big part of my career.”

MIL OSI

Source: Ara Institute of Canterbury

Ara graduates are going to receive their certificates in the newly renovated town hall in Christchurch this Friday. This is the first graduation that is being held there since the earthquakes.

Amongst the 940 students who are attending the autumn graduation are the first two Ara graduates of the Bachelor of Construction.

The degree was introduced for the first time in the South Island in 2018. Students who started their Ara journey with a Diploma in Construction were able to cross-credit and finish their education with a degree.

Vincent Goh, who is one of the graduates, says he was surprised that there are only two students in this ceremony.

Goh said he decided to study quantity surveying when he realised that he could help out Christchurch after the earthquakes and be part of the rebuild. Goh is originally from Malaysia and this is his way of giving something back to the city where he has been living for the last 14 years.

Goh says that he would recommend the degree to potential students.

“Ara provides a lot of useful resources. It is also provides good opportunities for graduates: Quite often people who work in the industry come to Ara to look for new employees. The tutors tell us about these opportunities and encourage us to apply.”

Courtney Fraser is going to speak on behalf of all graduates during the ceremonies at the Town Hall.

Student speaker Courtney Fraser, who is representing all the graduate students, agrees with Goh and speaks highly about her lecturers and tutors who offered full support during her studies.  

“I will miss the guidance from my tutors and lecturers. Because that’s what the tutors at Ara are – guides and really great mentors and without them I wouldn’t be where I am today.”

“I don’t like being lectured at. But at Ara I felt like I was learning real life skills and actually practicing things while I was studying. And by the time I got my job I was ready,” she says.

Fraser is an experienced speaker but has never been in front of such a big audience before. While she is not nervous about being on stage she is aware of the gravity her speech is going to have and the attention she will receive not just from fellow students but her own family.

“My speech is not just about me, it’s also about all my fellow graduates. I don’t want to cram as much as I can into three minutes. I want my words to have an impact.”

“I want to inspire my fellow graduates. I want to tell them that after they’ve worked so hard and pushed themselves to their limits, the world is theirs and it’s time to make their dreams come true.”

The graduation ceremonies are taking place on 29 March 2019 at 11.30am and 3.30pm at the Christchurch Town Hall (86 Kilmore Street).

MIL OSI

Ara students the first to graduate at Christchurch Town Hall

Source: Ara Institute of Canterbury

Ara graduates are going to receive their certificates in the newly renovated town hall in Christchurch this Friday. This is the first graduation that is being held there since the earthquakes.

Amongst the 940 students who are attending the autumn graduation are the first two Ara graduates of the Bachelor of Construction.

The degree was introduced for the first time in the South Island in 2018. Students who started their Ara journey with a Diploma in Construction were able to cross-credit and finish their education with a degree.

Vincent Goh, who is one of the graduates, says he was surprised that there are only two students in this ceremony.

Goh said he decided to study quantity surveying when he realised that he could help out Christchurch after the earthquakes and be part of the rebuild. Goh is originally from Malaysia and this is his way of giving something back to the city where he has been living for the last 14 years.

Goh says that he would recommend the degree to potential students.

“Ara provides a lot of useful resources. It is also provides good opportunities for graduates: Quite often people who work in the industry come to Ara to look for new employees. The tutors tell us about these opportunities and encourage us to apply.”

Courtney Fraser is going to speak on behalf of all graduates during the ceremonies at the Town Hall.

Student speaker Courtney Fraser, who is representing all the graduate students, agrees with Goh and speaks highly about her lecturers and tutors who offered full support during her studies.  

“I will miss the guidance from my tutors and lecturers. Because that’s what the tutors at Ara are – guides and really great mentors and without them I wouldn’t be where I am today.”

“I don’t like being lectured at. But at Ara I felt like I was learning real life skills and actually practicing things while I was studying. And by the time I got my job I was ready,” she says.

Fraser is an experienced speaker but has never been in front of such a big audience before. While she is not nervous about being on stage she is aware of the gravity her speech is going to have and the attention she will receive not just from fellow students but her own family.

“My speech is not just about me, it’s also about all my fellow graduates. I don’t want to cram as much as I can into three minutes. I want my words to have an impact.”

“I want to inspire my fellow graduates. I want to tell them that after they’ve worked so hard and pushed themselves to their limits, the world is theirs and it’s time to make their dreams come true.”

The graduation ceremonies are taking place on 29 March 2019 at 11.30am and 3.30pm at the Christchurch Town Hall (86 Kilmore Street).

MIL OSI

Source: Ara Institute of Canterbury

Ara graduates are going to receive their certificates in the newly renovated town hall in Christchurch this Friday. This is the first graduation that is being held there since the earthquakes.

Amongst the 940 students who are attending the autumn graduation are the first two Ara graduates of the Bachelor of Construction.

The degree was introduced for the first time in the South Island in 2018. Students who started their Ara journey with a Diploma in Construction were able to cross-credit and finish their education with a degree.

Vincent Goh, who is one of the graduates, says he was surprised that there are only two students in this ceremony.

Goh said he decided to study quantity surveying when he realised that he could help out Christchurch after the earthquakes and be part of the rebuild. Goh is originally from Malaysia and this is his way of giving something back to the city where he has been living for the last 14 years.

Goh says that he would recommend the degree to potential students.

“Ara provides a lot of useful resources. It is also provides good opportunities for graduates: Quite often people who work in the industry come to Ara to look for new employees. The tutors tell us about these opportunities and encourage us to apply.”

Courtney Fraser is going to speak on behalf of all graduates during the ceremonies at the Town Hall.

Student speaker Courtney Fraser, who is representing all the graduate students, agrees with Goh and speaks highly about her lecturers and tutors who offered full support during her studies.  

“I will miss the guidance from my tutors and lecturers. Because that’s what the tutors at Ara are – guides and really great mentors and without them I wouldn’t be where I am today.”

“I don’t like being lectured at. But at Ara I felt like I was learning real life skills and actually practicing things while I was studying. And by the time I got my job I was ready,” she says.

Fraser is an experienced speaker but has never been in front of such a big audience before. While she is not nervous about being on stage she is aware of the gravity her speech is going to have and the attention she will receive not just from fellow students but her own family.

“My speech is not just about me, it’s also about all my fellow graduates. I don’t want to cram as much as I can into three minutes. I want my words to have an impact.”

“I want to inspire my fellow graduates. I want to tell them that after they’ve worked so hard and pushed themselves to their limits, the world is theirs and it’s time to make their dreams come true.”

The graduation ceremonies are taking place on 29 March 2019 at 11.30am and 3.30pm at the Christchurch Town Hall (86 Kilmore Street).

MIL OSI

Statement from Ara about the Government’s ITP proposal

Source: Ara Institute of Canterbury

Statement from Ara’s Chief Executive Tony Gray-

Today, the government has clearly identified a strong vision for vocational education, with a number of key components that will affect all of New Zealand’s Institutes of Technology and Polytechnics (ITPs).

While we know broadly what upcoming changes may occur, there is as yet a significant lack of detail. This means that it is important for Ara to focus on the day-to-day context of its work for students and colleagues. As always, our focus will be on ensuring a productive and enjoyable year ahead for our students.

At the same time we will be strong contributors to the government’s consultation process and will be closely considering how the proposed changes will be most effective in delivering the very best outcomes from vocational education. The government has told us that, during the reform process, it wants to make sure that retraining and redeployment opportunities exist.

The government’s proposal ‘Reform of Vocational Education’ brings together the original review of the Vocational Education Training system led by the Ministry of Education and the Institutes of Technology and Polytechnics (ITPs) Roadmap 2020, led by the Tertiary Education Commission.

It has three main components. Of most significance to Ara is the proposal that all 16 ITPs will be brought under a single body called the New Zealand Institute of Skills & Technology. It is proposed that it will have a central governing body, with regions providing information about what is needed around the country.

A review of the role of ITOs is also proposed. It is suggested that they are reshaped into industry skills bodies that will focus on skills leadership; setting standards; working with new Centres of Vocational Excellence; and advising the Tertiary Education Commission about purchasing decisions.

To reduce duplication and competition and ensure better use of public money, a changed funding model is being considered.  The government has said it will work through the details of this new Vocational Education funding regime after consultation.

A clear message has been given that the government wants input from all local regional stakeholders including all ITPs, ITOs, iwi, and employers. A period of consultation starts today and will run until 27 March. More information about this is available on the  Kōrero Mātauranga website.  A cabinet decision on the proposed changes will likely be made in mid 2019 with a view to legislation being introduced from 1 January 2020.

MIL OSI

Source: Ara Institute of Canterbury

Statement from Ara’s Chief Executive Tony Gray-

Today, the government has clearly identified a strong vision for vocational education, with a number of key components that will affect all of New Zealand’s Institutes of Technology and Polytechnics (ITPs).

While we know broadly what upcoming changes may occur, there is as yet a significant lack of detail. This means that it is important for Ara to focus on the day-to-day context of its work for students and colleagues. As always, our focus will be on ensuring a productive and enjoyable year ahead for our students.

At the same time we will be strong contributors to the government’s consultation process and will be closely considering how the proposed changes will be most effective in delivering the very best outcomes from vocational education. The government has told us that, during the reform process, it wants to make sure that retraining and redeployment opportunities exist.

The government’s proposal ‘Reform of Vocational Education’ brings together the original review of the Vocational Education Training system led by the Ministry of Education and the Institutes of Technology and Polytechnics (ITPs) Roadmap 2020, led by the Tertiary Education Commission.

It has three main components. Of most significance to Ara is the proposal that all 16 ITPs will be brought under a single body called the New Zealand Institute of Skills & Technology. It is proposed that it will have a central governing body, with regions providing information about what is needed around the country.

A review of the role of ITOs is also proposed. It is suggested that they are reshaped into industry skills bodies that will focus on skills leadership; setting standards; working with new Centres of Vocational Excellence; and advising the Tertiary Education Commission about purchasing decisions.

To reduce duplication and competition and ensure better use of public money, a changed funding model is being considered.  The government has said it will work through the details of this new Vocational Education funding regime after consultation.

A clear message has been given that the government wants input from all local regional stakeholders including all ITPs, ITOs, iwi, and employers. A period of consultation starts today and will run until 27 March. More information about this is available on the  Kōrero Mātauranga website.  A cabinet decision on the proposed changes will likely be made in mid 2019 with a view to legislation being introduced from 1 January 2020.

MIL OSI