MIL-OSI Australia: 22/15:13 EDT Severe Thunderstorm Warning for parts of North East Forecast District.

Source: Australia Bureau of Meteorology

IDV21033
Australian Government Bureau of Meteorology
Victoria

TOP PRIORITY FOR IMMEDIATE BROADCAST

Severe Thunderstorm Warning

for DAMAGING WINDS and HEAVY RAINFALL

For people in parts of North East Forecast District.

Issued at 3:12 pm Tuesday, 22 January 2019.

Weather Situation:

Severe thunderstorms are likely to produce damaging winds and heavy rainfall that may lead to flash flooding in the warning area over the next several hours. Locations which may be affected include Wodonga and Corryong.

The State Emergency Service advises that people should:
* Move vehicles under cover or away from trees.
* Secure or put away loose items around your house, yard and balcony.
* Keep clear of fallen power lines.
* Keep clear of creeks and storm drains.
* Don’t drive, ride or walk through flood water.
* Be aware that in fire affected areas, rainfall run-off into waterways may contain debris such as ash, soil, trees and rocks.
* Be alert that in areas recently affected by fires, heavy rainfall increases the potential for landslides and debris across roads.
* Stay indoors if possible.
* Avoid using the phone during the storm.
* If you are outside, avoid sheltering under trees
* Listen to the radio for storm updates
* Switch off your computer and electrical appliances

The next warning is due to be issued by 6:15 pm.

Warnings are also available through TV and Radio broadcasts, the Bureau’s website at www.bom.gov.au or call 1300 659 217. The Bureau and State Emergency Service would appreciate warnings being broadcast regularly.

MIL OSI Australia

MIL-OSI Australia: Doorstop – James Cook University, Cairns

Source: Australia Government Ministerial Statements

Photo: AAP Image/Marc McCormack

THE HON WARREN ENTSCH MP: Well thank you very much indeed for being here. It’s another red letter day for Cairns and for far North Queensland. I have here our Prime Minister Scott Morrison and Professor Chris Cocklin from James Cook University and we are welcoming the Prime Minister to make a statement here today which is going to have a very positive and profound impact on our future, particularly in relation to medical science and for our hospital system in Cairns. So over to you.

PRIME MINISTER: Well thank very much Warren and thanks Chris for having here and to all the amazing scientists here who are doing tremendous work, not just for Australia but right across the regions. It’s tremendous to get a bit of an update on the work that they’ve been doing. Not that long ago I was here, Warren, as the JCU as well announcing $10 million for the innovation hub and I was which is being spent and those projects are happening.

But you know, since the last election, youth unemployment here has fallen from 28 per cent to 15.6 per cent. That’s what’s happened under our Government. Youth unemployment here in North Queensland, in Warren’s electorate has fallen from 28 per cent to 15.6 per cent. Now you might say why are you talking about that? Aren’t you going to talk about hospitals today? Yes I am going to talk about hospitals today. The reason I can announce today $60 million to support the James Cook University Tropical Enterprise Centre, that will free up 150 beds in Cairns Hospital and enable the fusion between the wonderful work we are seeing here done here with a teaching hospital and university here in North Queensland, the reason I can do that is because we’re running a strong economy and we’re running a strong Budget and with a strong economy youth unemployment falls, you get record employment growth, particularly for young people, which is what our Government, and the careful stewardship of our economy, is being is able to deliver. I am very pleased because we are running a strong economy we can invest and we can guarantee the essential services that Australians rely on.

Yesterday I was talking about critical new PBS listings for Australians suffering with lung cancer. Today, I can talk about freeing up 150 beds in Cairns Hospital here for the health treatment of locals here in North Queensland but also building on the incredible work being done by JCU as becoming an absolute centre of excellence when it comes to all things tropical. Tropical business, tropical research into medicines and diseases. Linking up with other parts of the world. Becoming an internationally recognised hub for all of this which will only further compound the opportunities and grow those opportunities here in far North Queensland. I want to thank Warren, I want to thank Con, I want to thank the whole team for the way they have focused on this project and bringing all the strands together. We’re doing this today because we’re able to do it because of a strong economy and I’m going to remain absolutely focused on continuing to deliver that strong economy which means we can have Medicare bulk billing rates at their highest on record. We can be funding hospitals here with increased funding. Up here since 2017, I think it is, by $39 million. And at the same time, the State Government has cut funding to hospitals up here. So when it comes to who you can rely on to increase funding for health without increasing your taxes, it’s the Liberals and the LNP here in Queensland.

So I want to thank you for the opportunity to be here today and make the announcement today and very happy to be doing so. Great work to Warren and the team up here in the north. And I want to thank, particularly Advance Cairns for the work they have done with in working with us on working up these proposals. We have had many meetings with Advance Cairns. I first met Trent years ago when I was Treasurer and we would come up and talk about the priorities and you can see the vision that Advance Cairns has right across the region. I know Warren has worked hand in glove with Advance Cairns to ensure that we can deliver, whether it is this project, the  project I announced last time I was here last time which just means the north can continue to grow stronger and with greater capability in future for the young people getting those jobs, the scientists and researchers coming from all around the world and from just people every day getting who need good quality health care and they’re getting it because of our strong economy which I am absolutely determined to continue.

PROFESSOR CHRIS COCKLIN: Thank you, welcome, Prime Minister, to James Cook University. What a great day it is for Cairns today. We are announcing… the Government is announcing a $60 million investment in the Cairns Hospital, which as the Prime Minister indicated is going to free up bed space. But as importantly, it is going to also enable the growth, diversification and strengthening of the Cairns Hospital in a way that really is warranted I think in this particular location and this particular region. It is something that absolutely has to happen.

So, what we’re talking about here is the bringing together of technologies and research in health and health-related disciplines, and particularly with the digital enabling of those capabilities, health capabilities. And so, the Prime Minister’s used the word “fusion”. We will be bringing together the work that is done through our IOT, our Internet Of Things disciplines and putting that together with our health-related disciplines to establish a centre, the Cairns Tropical Enterprise Centre, that will enable us in Cairns to establish this location as a national and indeed an international leader in digital connections with health. And so things like being able to provide remote diagnosis to people at great distance, to using sensor technology to be able to better diagnose and indeed to be able to prescribe treatments for people at large.

The other element of this particular investment from the Morrison Government is that it’s going to create a place in which we can advance another national priority which is in STEM education, science, technology, engineering, maths education. What we aspire to with the CTEC is to create a facility in which we can work with the local high school to create a leading edge international capability to provide STEM education to students in Cairns and that’s the foundation on which that employment that the Prime Minister has referred to will actually grow and prosper.

So we’re very pleased that the Centre not only will bring together the health and the digital agendas but also provide a wonderful facility for young people in Cairns to prosper in their science education. Look, I would also like to express first, thanks to the Morrison Government for this wonderful, inspired, innovative investment in the Cairns region. We are deeply grateful, Prime Minister, for what you have announced today. I express thanks also to our colleague and friend, Mr Warren Entsch, Member for Leichhardt and I would like to express considerable thanks to Advance Cairns who have worked so hard on this particular initiative. So we look forward to working with Cairns health and hospital service in now developing and refining the plans and forging ahead with great speed and alacrity. Thank you very much.

PRIME MINISTER: Thank you, please give our regards to the Vice Chancellor who I was here with last time. Obviously this project is done with partners. One of the great thing about JCU is how they work with partners in the commercial sector and the teaching sector, the hospital sector and so on. But it also needs the support of the State Government, some $90 million for this project, the Commonwealth is stumping up for our part, $10 million for this land and $50 million for the construction of the new facilities for the CTEC. So we just want to get on with the project. It’s a great project for North Queensland.

Happy to take some questions on this announcement today. If there are other questions you’d like to talk about, we might excuse the acting Vice Chancellor for that, he doesn’t need to be quizzed on those matters but we can deal with those things then.

JOURNALIST: Obviously we’ve seen quite a lot of news about the ramping rates rising here in the far north, would you care to speak about how this development will help resolve some of those issues?

PRIME MINISTER: I missed that start of that question.

JOURNALIST: We have seen a lot of issues with the ramping rate here at Cairns Hospital rising and other staffing issues come up. How will this development help in that regard?

PRIME MINISTER: For a start, we’re freeing up 150 beds. If you’re out there in Cairns today and around in the region and say what does it mean for me? 150 extra beds that will be there in the Cairns Hospital which is incredibly important. As I said, we’ve put over $30 million extra into hospitals here in North Queensland. It is disappointing the State Government has actually cut funds to hospitals here. So they need to step up, that’s what they need to do. But Warren, you are the local member and might want to comment?

THE HON WARREN ENTSCH MP: Yeah and the other thing is of course a lot of the JCU teaching staff will coming out from the hospital to this dedicated building so it that then provides more opportunities there for the State Government to be able to put more people into front-line services, nurses and doctors etc. Because not only is there space for the beds, those additional beds, but there will also be space for the support to have with it. And I hope and expect that they would take advantage of that opportunity and ramp up the numbers because that’s where the problems lie. And so it is a great opportunity and I think this is something to… that we can really grab with both hands. This is a major step forward in becoming a tier 6 hospital and this is what we’re aspiring to do. This is what we are all targeting for and of course this then puts us up there on a bigger footing than anywhere else in the country. Because of the location with the international connections, particularly the regional connections that we have, it really puts us into an international forum as well which is very exciting.

PRIME MINISTER: They can also sign up for the hospitals agreement, the State Government, there is $7 billion of funding for the Queensland hospitals in that agreement which they are still yet to sign over the next five years and I hope they take up the opportunities as other states and territories have.

JOURNALIST: What about staffing pressures? How will it alleviate that at the Cairns Hospital, this announcement?

PRIME MINISTER: Again, what we are doing is we’re freeing up the beds, we’re freeing up the room. The State Government, we’ve offered a $7 billion hospitals agreement right across the state so they can get on with the job. This is record funding for hospitals across Queensland. They need to sign and get access to that money, which we want to provide them. We are standing there with the cheque book and the deal and saying, “Sign up, let’s get on with it” and then they should exercise their responsibilities to meet the health and needs of North Queenslanders.

THE HON WARREN ENTSCH MP: We provide the money, we do not actually employ the staff. We do not build the hospitals, we just provide the funds. So it is up to them, the money is there, the space is there, the opportunity is being created for what is being announced today. All they need to do now is start recruiting.

JOURNALIST: What was your take on Bill Shorten saying he would match the same funding if elected?

PRIME MINISTER: I would say to the people of North Queensland, don’t take Bill Shorten’s carbon copy with higher taxes, take the real thing. This is what we have been working on for some time with Advance Cairns and Warren. He can follow me around the country and pretend he can do these things. But I’ll tell you what he can’t do, he can’t do it without lifting people taxes and he can’t do it under a stronger economy. You cannot guarantee health services with a weaker economy. If you’re going to put $200 billion of higher taxes on the Australian economy, that weakens it. That weakens your ability to deliver these important health and education services, disability services, providing important welfare supports throughout the community. You deliver this through a stronger economy. So what I’m announcing here today, I’m announcing on the back of strong economic management. Any time Bill Shorten opens his mouth, what he is talking about is doing things with you paying higher taxes. So as he gets around Queensland in his tax bus, he should be explaining to people why taxes have to go up because he can’t manage money. He can’t manage his own Budget so he will take money out of yours.

JOURNALIST: Prime Minister, will this be – the $60 million – be in the April Budget?

PRIME MINISTER: It is already factored in. The decision has already been taken and it is already in the forwards.

JOURNALIST: Has a school been chosen that is going to partner with JCU? You’d think Cairns High from a proxy meeting would be a logical choice?

PROFESSOR CHRIS COCKLIN: Certainly, Cairns State High is one that we have already had some conversations with about STEM education and the principal is here today. We will certainly be taking those conversations further in terms of partners. It is an important priority for the region, for the city. As you say, proximity counts for a lot in this particular case.

THE HON WARREN ENTSCH MP: And we have the Executive Principal of Cairns State High standing there looking very slim.

[Laughter]

Can I get Advance Cairns to make a comment?

TRENT TWOMEY, ADVANCE CAIRNS: Thank you, Prime Minister and thank you, James Cook University and of course to our Federal Member. This has been a long time in the making. Two years we have been talking to the Federal Government about this, both when you were Treasurer, PM, and now that you’re in the big chair. But what does it mean for North Queensland? A university hospital by any other name is a teaching hospital and is a level six tertiary facility. So what does it mean? What that means for the average Cairns resident, for the average far North Queensland resident is they no longer have to travel south to get the health services that they need, whether it be special orthopaedics, specialty paediatrics or specialty ophthalmology, what it means is you will get the very best, world-class healthcare right here at our own university hospital. So that’s what it means for you. The other point from an economic point that we would like to make is health and community services is the largest sector in the far North Queensland economy. So the Cairns and Hinterland Hospital and Health Service is the largest employer in far North Queensland. So there are more tables in more kitchens that have food on them because of the employer that is the Cairns and Hinterland Hospital and Health Service. So thank you very much Prime Minister, for announcement today. We look forward to working with you.

PRIME MINISTER: Thanks very much Trent. OK, I think Trent has covered that very, very well. In the last Budget, just to pick up on the point that Trent mentioned, the medical industry economic plan was a key part of that Budget recognising exactly that point Trent was making. People are saying, “Where are the new jobs coming from? Where is the record jobs growth coming from?” It has come from sectors like the medical industry, the human services industry, the disability support care sector. A lot more of those jobs are coming out of those sectors and particularly in regional parts of the country. So you make the point very well, Trent. It is one of the reasons why I said at the outset of this media conference, that youth unemployment is falling because of initiatives like this. OK, well I will excuse our friends and thank you all very much for your participation.

JOURNALIST: Can I ask one question if I may Prime Minister, Paul Makin FAB FM Port Douglas. This is a very serious thing. She has encouraged people on Australia Day to wear thongs and shorts in tropical weather.

PRIME MINISTER: She, sorry?

JOURNALIST: Julia Leu, the local Mayor of Port Douglas has said that in tropical weather we need shorts and thongs.

PRIME MINISTER:  Look, what is important is that people treat the day with respect. Now, I have been and I am sure Warren has been to even more, and particularly up here, citizenship ceremonies. When I go the citizenship ceremonies, whether it is in hot weather or whether it is in cold weather, the vast majority of people come and they dress a bit like people are dressed here. They do that out of respect.

JOURNALIST:  Sorry, Prime Minister…

You are in the minority today. You are the only one here wearing thongs and shorts. I suspect it was behind the question.

JOURNALIST: I apologise.

PRIME MINISTER: Nevertheless, the point is it is a day for respect and citizenship is an important institution. I wouldn’t go along to my kids’ graduation wearing boardies and thongs. I wouldn’t do that, I would respect the work they have put in and the seriousness of the day and what they have achieved and I am simply making an obvious point that the code and the guidelines are there to ensure that citizenship and its institution is treated with respect. So if other people want to play games with it and make cheap points about it, they can. My point is simple – respect citizenship, respect the day.

JOURNALIST: You have criticised the Canberra bubble in the past.  Do you think you are you adding to the culture wars through this Australia Day debate?

PRIME MINISTER: No, I am just calling it as I see it. I have had this view for a very long time. I was the Minister for Immigration. It was my signature on people’s citizenships. In fact when I was at Kakadu the other day I has couple came up to me and they wanted to meet me because I had signed their citizenship form and their certificate that they have. This is a very significant gift given by the people of Australia to welcome someone as a citizen. It is one of the most, if not the most, important thing as a nation we can give to anyone in the world and when you do it, when you provide that gift, we would expect anyone who is receiving it to treat Australia with respect.

THE HON WARREN ENTSCH MP: And it says quite clearly, while you get all of the rights, there are obligations and while you might sort of be light-hearted about an individual in how they want to appear, you also have got to be respectful for all of the others that are standing in line, whether they be in their traditional dress of their homeland. They all fought very, very hard and worked very hard to earn the right to become citizens of this country and I think even out of respect for the other people that are getting that certificate it is not unreasonable to ask that people be dressed in the appropriate manner. Now, would we have a coat and tie up here? Of course not.

PRIME MINISTER: Of course not.

THE HON WARREN ENTSCH MP: That’s be ridiculous. But, you can be smart dressed and appropriately dressed. As I say, it looks great to have the colour of a lot of the original homelands in their traditional dress, but out of respect for those, I think everybody should be at least dressed in an appropriate manner. I 100 per cent support what the Prime Minister says.

PRIME MINISTER: Thank you, Warren.

JOURNALIST: Prime Minister, how dismayed were you to hear about the release of Abu Bakar Bashir?

PRIME MINISTER: I don’t want to make too much comment on that today. We are working and have been in close contact with the Indonesian Government as I said in my press conference on Saturday. That continues. We have been consistent, always, Governments of both persuasions over a long period of time about our concerns about Abu Bakar Bashir and that he should serve what the Indonesian justice system has delivered to him as his sentence. In these cases, when prisoners have served about two-thirds of their sentence, it is not uncommon for them to get parole, but we would be very… we have been very clear about the need to ensure that as part of our joint counterterrorism efforts – we have an excellent counterterrorism partnership with Indonesia – that Abu Bakar Bashir would not be in any position or any in way able to influence or incite anything. Let’s not forget that that Bali bombing led to the deaths of Indonesians as well. Australians died horrifically on that night and I think Australians everywhere would be expecting that this matter was treated with the utmost seriousness. Of course by our Government, which it is, and I have had direct contact over this matter, but also that the Indonesian Government would show great respect for Australia in how they manage this issue also.

JOURNALIST: In light of the pill testing debate, New South Wales Greens MP Cate Faehrmann has admitted to taking illegal drugs. Have you ever taken illegal drugs?

PRIME MINISTER: No, I haven’t. And look, we go through those questions every time when we get around elections. But what is serious is young people are dying takings these drugs. As a parent, these things always cause you great anxiety. My children, they are young. They are nine and eleven. They will go through that time in high school and those other times when they are older where they will be exposed to all sorts of things which I wish as a father I could shield them from. I met Aiia’s father in a completely different context, who was brutally murdered in Melbourne. As a father to father, we sat and spoke and we were dealing with some practical issues, but also just to extend my deep sorrow for him and his family. Look, as parents, it is the best job in the world, but it is also the hardest job in the world, but you love your kids and you want them to be safe. I can assure you that our Government will do everything within our power to keep our kids safe, but and we will endeavour to do that by leading by example.

JOURNALIST: Prime Minister, more recently at the Australian Open did seem to boo when you did appear on screen is that a concern to you?

[Laughter]

PRIME MINISTER: I don’t think they liked the line call.

[Laughter]

It is a great tradition. I would be disappointed if they didn’t. Bob Hawke and everyone else got the same treatment at games. I enjoyed being there last night. It was a fantastic game. With the million or so Greek Australians, they would have been pretty excited about the outcome and Jenny and I certainly enjoyed the contest, but nowhere near as much as we enjoyed Ash Barty’s win and to meet Ash afterwards, she is delightful. We are looking forward to the return game tomorrow,  for the quarterfinal. Hopefully she can go all the way. But let’s not put too much pressure on her. She is a pretty focused young Australian and she is a great Queenslander, too. We are hoping for the best for Ash as she goes up in the contest on Tuesday.

But I have got to say, the Australian Open I have got to tell you is the most significant international event that Australia hosts. It is on every single screen throughout our region, around the world and it is on there for weeks and weeks. I know this from my time as being head of Tourism Australia. It is the single biggest event that speaks to the world about Australia and I want to commend the organisers and the work that has been done. It was an outstanding event during my attendance yesterday and I was pleased to be able to announce $12 million to support 3,000 more young girls staying in tennis, playing tennis, making sure they have female coaches and we are bridging the gap having competitions more in their local area. We know that young girls join tennis to play with their friends and spend time with their. That is what the research tells us. The program is around that. So I was there to happy to be supporting tennis, supporting Ash and supporting Australia.

JOURNALIST: As you say, it is an international event that does broadcast globally. It does send a message to the world. Is that message that Australians are not happy with the current leadership?

PRIME MINISTER: No, it doesn’t. It doesn’t.

JOURNALIST: Kelly O’Dwyer is resigning. Will you insist she will be are placed by another woman in her seat of Higgins?

PRIME MINISTER: That’s what I believe is going to happen.

JOURNALIST: So Peter Costello is not a potential candidate?

PRIME MINISTER: I haven’t heard anything to that effect.

JOURNALIST: Have you been given any assurances that Julie Bishop intends to stay on after the election?

PRIME MINISTER: Julie has made her own statement on that. I just refer to her statement on that. Thanks very much.

MIL OSI Australia

MIL-OSI Australia: Honouring Captain James Cook’s voyage

Source: Australia Government Ministerial Statements

Image – Australian National Maritime Museum

The Morrison Government is backing communities across the country to mark the 250th anniversary of Captain James Cook’s first voyage to Australia and the Pacific.

In addition to $5.45 million to support projects for the Cooktown 2020 Festival, the Morrison Government will provide $6.7 million to the Australian National Maritime Museum so its replica of Captain Cook’s HMB Endeavour can circumnavigate the country, hosting a series of events and activities at each of its proposed 39 stops.

The circumnavigation will be funded from the Government’s existing $48.7 million package to mark the anniversary that includes exhibitions through the National Library of Australia, support for the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies to preserve and celebrate Indigenous culture and assistance for the NSW Government to deliver the Kamay Botany Bay National Park Master Plan.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison said the events would offer new generations an insight into Captain Cook, the Endeavour and the experiences of Indigenous Australians.

“As the 250th anniversary nears we want to help Australians better understand Captain Cook’s historic voyage and its legacy for exploration, science and reconciliation,” the Prime Minister said.

“That voyage is the reason Australia is what it is today and it’s important we take the opportunity to reflect on it.

“From Far North Queensland and the Cooktown 2020 Festival across to Bunbury and down to Hobart, our Government will ensure Australians young and old can see firsthand the legacy of Captain Cook and the voyage of the Endeavour.”

The Morrison Government’s $5.45 million investment in projects for the Cooktown 2020 Festival includes development of the Reconciliation Rocks Precinct, the Botanic Gardens and upgrades to the Gamaay Dreaming Track to not only commemorate the anniversary and local Indigenous culture, but provide a lasting economic contribution to Cooktown. It will also support the Waymburr Milbi project to house artefacts used for the annual re-enactment of the story of Australia’s first act of reconciliation told by the Guugu Yimithirr people on the banks of the Endeavour River.

LNP Member for Leichhardt Warren Entsch said the investment ahead of the Cooktown 2020 Festival would ensure the local region was a focal point for the 250th anniversary events.

“Our region has an incredible connection to Captain Cook’s voyage and we want the rest of Australia to hear our stories,” Mr Entsch said.

“Our Government has listened to Cooktown and we’re delivering.

“This investment will help drive tourism for Cooktown and Far North Queensland. We’re bringing people from across the country to Cooktown not just to experience the Festival and hear our history, but to enjoy the local area’s incredible natural attractions and hospitality.”

Minister for the Arts Mitch Fifield said the Government’s investment in the replica Endeavour’s circumnavigation would be managed sensitively, and will present both the view from the ship and the view from the shore of Cook’s historic voyage.

“The HMB Endeavour replica will set sail from Sydney in March 2020, and head south to Hobart before turning north to commence a full circumnavigation of mainland Australia,” Minister Fifield said.

“The final itinerary, including the nature of HMB Endeavour’s replica visit to each of the proposed locations (anchorage, berth or sail by) and the associated dates, will be announced in the first half of this year following community consultations by the Australian National Maritime Museum.

“The voyage will provide many opportunities for Australians to see the HMB Endeavour replica, either at one of the ports it visits or when it anchors or passes by.”

Construction of the Australian-built replica commenced in 1988 and since undertaking its maiden voyage in 1994 the vessel has enabled hundreds of thousands of visitors to experience how Captain Cook and his shipmates lived.

The HMB Endeavour replica is expected to make the following stops:

  • Northern Territory – Darwin, Yirrakala
  • New South Wales – Botany Bay, Coffs Harbour, Eden, Jervis Bay, Newcastle, Sydney
  • Queensland – Aurukun, Brisbane, Cairns, Cooktown, Gladstone, Hamilton Island, Lizard Island, Mackay, Possession Island, Seventeen Seventy, Thursday Island, Townsville, Weipa, Yarrabah
  • South Australia – Port Adelaide, Port Lincoln, Port Pirie,  Whyalla
  • Tasmania – Hobart
  • Victoria – Geelong, Melbourne, Portland, Williamstown
  • Western Australia – Albany, Broome, Bunbury, Carnarvon, Esperance, Fremantle, Geraldton, Port Hedland

The Australian National Maritime Museum will host a series of events and activities at each stop the HMB Endeavour replica makes throughout its March 2020 to May 2021 voyage.

The attached map depicts all proposed port, anchorage and sail by locations.

For more information, including images and footage of the HMB Endeavour replica, visit: www.sea.museum  

MIL OSI Australia

MIL-OSI Australia: Managers and Professionals have highest hourly earnings (Media Release)

Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics 2

MEDIA RELEASE

22 January 2019

Embargoed: 11.30 am (Canberra time)

Managers and Professionals have highest hourly earnings

In May 2018, Managers and Professionals had the highest average hourly earnings (at $60.40 and $54.00 per hour), according to results from the Survey of Employee Earnings and Hours, released today by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS).

The lowest hourly earners, on average, were Sales workers ($28.50) and Labourers ($29.50). The average for all employees was $39.10 per hour.

Across industries, average hourly earnings were lowest in the Accommodation and food services industry ($25.90), and highest in the Mining industry ($60.60).

Bruce Hockman, Chief Economist at the ABS, said “Full-time employees, who make up the majority of employees, received an average earnings of $1,699 per week, which would be around $88,000 in annual terms.” The latest figure for all employees, which also includes people working part-time, was $1,289.

Weekly earnings were higher for men working full-time ($1,811) than for women working full-time ($1,516). However, women working part-time earned slightly more, on average, than men working part-time ($669 compared to $666).

The top quarter of earners in Australia received more than $1,686 per week, while the lowest earning quarter received less than $682.

The most common method of setting pay was a collective agreement (40 per cent), followed by an individual arrangement (37 per cent). Less than a quarter of employees were paid according to an award (23 per cent).

“Men were more likely to have their pay set by an individual arrangement (44 per cent), whereas the most common method for women was a collective agreement (42 per cent),” said Mr Hockman.

Data from this survey are used in two of the three gender pay gap measures reported in Gender Indicators, Australia (cat. no. 4125.0). Updated measures will be released on Wednesday, 23 January 2019, incorporating information from this release.

About this release:

  • This release is conducted every two years with a May reference period;
  • Measures include hourly and weekly earnings, as well as bonuses, leave taken, overtime hours;
  • Provides a breakdown by age, sex, state and territory, industry and sector, and business size; and
  • Records method of setting pay such as by Award, Collective agreement, Individual arrangement, or if set by the Owner manager of an incorporated enterprise.

Further information is available in Employee Earnings and Hours, Australia, May 2018 (cat. no. 6306.0), available for free download from the ABS website at www.abs.gov.au

Media notes:

  • Please ensure when reporting on ABS data that you attribute the Australian Bureau of Statistics (or the ABS) as the source.
  • For media requests and interviews, contact ABS Media on 1300 175 070 or at media@abs.gov.au (8.30am-5pm Mon-Fri).
  • Subscribe to our media release notification service to be notified of ABS media releases or publications upon their release.

MIL OSI Australia

MIL-OSI Australia: Employee Earnings and Hours, Australia

Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics 2

MEDIA RELEASE

22 January 2019

Embargoed: 11.30 am (Canberra time)

Managers and Professionals have highest hourly earnings

In May 2018, Managers and Professionals had the highest average hourly earnings (at $60.40 and $54.00 per hour), according to results from the Survey of Employee Earnings and Hours, released today by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS).

The lowest hourly earners, on average, were Sales workers ($28.50) and Labourers ($29.50). The average for all employees was $39.10 per hour.

Across industries, average hourly earnings were lowest in the Accommodation and food services industry ($25.90), and highest in the Mining industry ($60.60).

Bruce Hockman, Chief Economist at the ABS, said “Full-time employees, who make up the majority of employees, received an average earnings of $1,699 per week, which would be around $88,000 in annual terms.” The latest figure for all employees, which also includes people working part-time, was $1,289.

Weekly earnings were higher for men working full-time ($1,811) than for women working full-time ($1,516). However, women working part-time earned slightly more, on average, than men working part-time ($669 compared to $666).

The top quarter of earners in Australia received more than $1,686 per week, while the lowest earning quarter received less than $682.

The most common method of setting pay was a collective agreement (40 per cent), followed by an individual arrangement (37 per cent). Less than a quarter of employees were paid according to an award (23 per cent).

“Men were more likely to have their pay set by an individual arrangement (44 per cent), whereas the most common method for women was a collective agreement (42 per cent),” said Mr Hockman.

Data from this survey are used in two of the three gender pay gap measures reported in Gender Indicators, Australia (cat. no. 4125.0). Updated measures will be released on Wednesday, 23 January 2019, incorporating information from this release.

About this release:

  • This release is conducted every two years with a May reference period;
  • Measures include hourly and weekly earnings, as well as bonuses, leave taken, overtime hours;
  • Provides a breakdown by age, sex, state and territory, industry and sector, and business size; and
  • Records method of setting pay such as by Award, Collective agreement, Individual arrangement, or if set by the Owner manager of an incorporated enterprise.

Further information is available in Employee Earnings and Hours, Australia, May 2018 (cat. no. 6306.0), available for free download from the ABS website at www.abs.gov.au

Media notes:

  • Please ensure when reporting on ABS data that you attribute the Australian Bureau of Statistics (or the ABS) as the source.
  • For media requests and interviews, contact ABS Media on 1300 175 070 or at media@abs.gov.au (8.30am-5pm Mon-Fri).
  • Subscribe to our media release notification service to be notified of ABS media releases or publications upon their release.

MIL OSI Australia

MIL-OSI Australia: Research report: Fatigue experience and culture in Australian commercial air transport pilots

Source: Australian Transport Safety Bureau

Why the ATSB did the research

Fatigue is an inevitable risk in aviation. As it cannot be completely eliminated, it must be managed. Data on fatigue and its impact on air transport safety is generally only obtained if there is an incident or accident. As a result, there is generally a lack of understanding of the baseline level of fatigue in day-to-day Australian air transport across operators.

To provide the air transport industry, regulators and policy makers with further insights into industry perceptions of fatigue, the ATSB conducted a survey of commercial pilots engaged in passenger, freight, and aeromedical operations in the second half of 2016. To understand the reported level of fatigue during normal operations, the survey aimed to discover the amount of sleep and rest obtained by pilots, as well as their perceptions on the length of rests and duty times. The survey also aimed to capture data on the organisational aspects of fatigue, including how pilots feel about removing themselves from duty because of fatigue experienced and how they think management perceive this behaviour.

What the ATSB found

The majority of survey respondents reported they were sufficiently well rested by the end of their last duty. Over half of pilots reported having 7 hours of sleep or more in the previous 24 hours, and over 60 per cent reported having more than 14 hours in the previous 48 hours, at the end of the last flight. The survey also found a small but significant number of pilots, 10 per cent and 17 per cent, who reported obtaining less than 5 hours of sleep in the previous 24 hours, or less than 12 hours in the previous 48 hours, respectively, at the end of their last flight. These sleep thresholds have been shown to be associated with impaired performance.

Less sleep on duty was more prevalent for international and domestic jet airline pilots than other air transport pilots (regional, charter and aeromedical). While around one third of the respondents reported obtaining the same amount of sleep at home as they did while on duty, around half of international and domestic pilots reported obtaining less hours of sleep on duty than at home. About 15 per cent of international pilots responded they had no rest during their last international flight.

Domestic pilots completed duties on a stand-by day more often than other pilots. Some believed the rest period between duties was too short, duty periods were too long, and access to food during duties was more difficult compared with other pilots, indicating some pilots within this group have negative perceptions of rest opportunities provided by their employers.

Over 90 per cent of pilots indicated their employer offered a formal process for removing themselves from duty due to fatigue. About one third of respondents indicated they removed themselves from duty at least once in the past year, mostly between one and three days. The pilots who removed themselves from duty generally perceived their actions left a negative impression with management (with the exception of aeromedical pilots), and did not feel comfortable doing so.

Safety message

Responsibility to manage the risk of fatigue lies with both the individual pilot and organisation. It is the individual pilot’s responsibility to use rest periods to obtain adequate sleep and to remove themselves from duty if they feel fatigued. It is important for operators to implement policies to reduce the likelihood of fatigue-related issues through rostering practices and by providing an organisational culture where crew can report fatigue in a supportive environment. The results of this research suggest that operating in circumstances conducive to fatigue is an ongoing challenge for a proportion of Australian air transport pilots.

MIL OSI Australia

MIL-OSI Australia: Pilot experiences with fatigue

Source: Australian Transport Safety Bureau

The ATSB has released a research report outlining the results of a survey on experiences with fatigue by commercial pilots in Australia.

The research report, Fatigue experience and culture in Australian commercial air transport pilots (AR-2015-095), highlights the majority of pilot surveyed reported they were well rested at the end of their last duty.

Over half of the pilots reported having seven hours of sleep or more in the previous 24 hours, and over 60 per cent reported having more than 14 hours in the previous 48 hours at the end of their past duty.

ATSB Chief Commissioner, Greg Hood, said the report highlighted fatigue, and issues associated fatigue, were not common in the Australia, but some pilots do face operating in conditions conducive to fatigue.

“While small in number, some pilots did report operating in conditions consistent with thresholds that have been shown to be associated with impaired performance due to fatigue at the end of their last flight,” Mr Hood said. 

The report shows that 10 per cent of pilots reported obtaining less than five hours of sleep in the previous 24 hours, and 17 per cent reported they had less 12 hours in the previous 48 hours of their last fight.

The report also points to other areas for improvement, including organisational culture regarding the reporting of fatigue related issues.

“A third of surveyed pilots reported they had removed themselves from duty in the previous 12 months, however when they did this they reportedly felt it left a negative impression with management,” Mr Hood said.

“The responsibility to manage the risk of fatigue lies with both pilots and operators. Pilots need to use rest periods to get adequate sleep and remove themselves from duty if affected by fatigue and operators need to have polices in place to manage fatigue and create a work culture were pilots and crew can report fatigue in a supportive environment.”

The Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) is currently consulting with industry on the introduction of the proposed CAO 48.1 Instrument 2019 – Modernising Australia’s Fatigue Rules.

High capacity regular public transport operators are required to transition to the new fatigue rules by 30 September 2019. All other operators will need to adopt the new fatigue requirements by 26 March 2020.

Advice on how pilots can manage their fatigue is also available on the CASA website.

Read the report: Fatigue experience and culture in Australian commercial air transport pilots (AR-2015-095).

Last update 22 January 2019

MIL OSI Australia

MIL-OSI Australia: 22/08:24 EDT Marine Wind Warning Summary for New South Wales

Source: Australia Bureau of Meteorology

IDN20400

Australian Government Bureau of Meteorology
New South Wales

Marine Wind Warning Summary for New South Wales

Issued at 8:24 am EDT on Tuesday 22 January 2019
for the period until midnight EDT Wednesday 23 January 2019.

Wind Warnings for Wednesday 23 January

Strong Wind Warning for the following area:
Eden Coast

The next marine wind warning summary will be issued by 4:05 pm EDT Tuesday.

Check the latest Coastal Waters Forecast or Local Waters Forecast for information on wind, wave and weather conditions for these coastal zones.

MIL OSI Australia

MIL-OSI Australia: 22/07:31 EDT Marine Wind Warning Summary for New South Wales

Source: Australia Bureau of Meteorology

IDN20400

Australian Government Bureau of Meteorology
New South Wales

Marine Wind Warning Summary for New South Wales

Issued at 7:31 am EDT on Tuesday 22 January 2019
for the period until midnight EDT Wednesday 23 January 2019.

Wind Warnings for Wednesday 23 January

Strong Wind Warning for the following area:
Eden Coast

The next marine wind warning summary will be issued by 4:05 pm EDT Tuesday.

Check the latest Coastal Waters Forecast or Local Waters Forecast for information on wind, wave and weather conditions for these coastal zones.

Source: Australia Bureau of Meteorology

IDN20400

Australian Government Bureau of Meteorology
New South Wales

Marine Wind Warning Summary for New South Wales

Issued at 7:31 am EDT on Tuesday 22 January 2019
for the period until midnight EDT Wednesday 23 January 2019.

Wind Warnings for Wednesday 23 January

Strong Wind Warning for the following area:
Eden Coast

The next marine wind warning summary will be issued by 4:05 pm EDT Tuesday.

Check the latest Coastal Waters Forecast or Local Waters Forecast for information on wind, wave and weather conditions for these coastal zones.

MIL OSI Australia

MIL-OSI Australia: HVNL Review: Terms of reference and expert panel announced

Source: Australian National Transport Commission

HVNL Review: Terms of reference and expert panel announced

21 January 2019

The Transport and Infrastructure Council has approved the terms of reference for the Heavy Vehicle National Law Review.

Transport ministers have also appointed a panel of experts with expertise in productivity and experience across the transport sector to guide the review.

The expert panel will be chaired by Peter Harris, the recent chairman of the Productivity Commission.

The expert panel comprises:

  • Sharon Middleton – Director, Whiteline Transport and President, South Australian Road Transport Association
  • Andrew Ethell – Executive Director, Amalgam Strategic and Board Member, Infrastructure Australia
  • Gary Mahon – Chief Executive Officer, Queensland Trucking Association
  • Gary Liddle – Enterprise Professor of Transport, Melbourne University and Senior Strategic Adviser, Transport, Jacobs
  • Louise Bilato – Executive Officer, NT Road Transport Association

The NTC looks forward to working with this eminent group to improve heavy vehicle regulation in Australia.

The NTC will meet with the expert panel at the end of January 2019 and will provide more information on how the review will be conducted after this meeting.

Last Updated: 21/1/2019

Source: Australian National Transport Commission

HVNL Review: Terms of reference and expert panel announced

21 January 2019

The Transport and Infrastructure Council has approved the terms of reference for the Heavy Vehicle National Law Review.

Transport ministers have also appointed a panel of experts with expertise in productivity and experience across the transport sector to guide the review.

The expert panel will be chaired by Peter Harris, the recent chairman of the Productivity Commission.

The expert panel comprises:

  • Sharon Middleton – Director, Whiteline Transport and President, South Australian Road Transport Association
  • Andrew Ethell – Executive Director, Amalgam Strategic and Board Member, Infrastructure Australia
  • Gary Mahon – Chief Executive Officer, Queensland Trucking Association
  • Gary Liddle – Enterprise Professor of Transport, Melbourne University and Senior Strategic Adviser, Transport, Jacobs
  • Louise Bilato – Executive Officer, NT Road Transport Association

The NTC looks forward to working with this eminent group to improve heavy vehicle regulation in Australia.

The NTC will meet with the expert panel at the end of January 2019 and will provide more information on how the review will be conducted after this meeting.

Last Updated: 21/1/2019

MIL OSI Australia