MIL-OSI UK: Tenant Fees Bill: Lords third reading

Source: British Parliament News

14 January 2019
The Tenant Fees Bill has its third reading, a chance to ‘tidy up’ the bill and make changes, in the Lords on Tuesday 15 January.

Members are expected to discuss two amendments relating to interest payments owed by landlords or letting agents to enforcement authorities.
Lords report stage: Tuesday 11 December
Members discussed the acceptance of multiple holding deposits for the same property, the approval and designation of client money protection schemes and the requirement to belong to such a scheme.
Lords committee stage day two: Tuesday 20 November
Members discussed the early termination of tenancies and payments in respect of identity and immigration status checks.
Report stage, a further chance to examine the bill and make changes, is scheduled for 5 December.
Lords committee stage day one: Monday 5 November
The first day of committee stage of this bill took place in Grand Committee, a room outside the Lords chamber. In Grand Committee, any member can take part and decisions on amendments can be made, but no votes can take place.
Members discussed a range of subjects, including:
the government’s duty to provide tenants with guidance on the effects of this bill
the reimbursement of costs incurred by enforcement agencies in the exercise of their duties
the requirement of tenants to make payments to cover a landlord or agent’s loss due to a breach of the tenancy contract
Lords second reading: Wednesday 10 October
Members discussed unfair letting fees, compensation payments to tenants and home share schemes.
Lord Bourne of Aberystwyth (Conservative), parliamentary under-secretary in the Department for Housing, Communities and Local Government, responded on behalf of the government.
Tenant Fees Bill summary
This bill will aim to:
make renting fairer and more affordable for tenants by reducing the costs at the outset of a tenancy
improve transparency and competition in the private rental market
ban letting fees paid by tenants in England
improve fairness, competition and affordability in the lettings sector
Further information
Image: iStockphoto

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MIL-OSI UK: Opposition press Government on changes to Universal Credit

Source: British Parliament News

14 January 2019
Margaret Greenwood, Shadow Secretary for Work and Pensions asked an urgent question on Universal Credit, the two-child limit and social security freeze.

This follows a speech last Friday in which the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, Amber Rudd, announced a new approach to delivering ‘a system that supports people into work, supports those in need and provides fairness to the taxpayer’. The Government’s new approach includes the cancellation of a plan to extend a two-child limit on Universal Credit to children born before the policy came into effect.
Greenwood asked a series of questions relating to the implementation of Universal Credit, the two-child policy and the migration of individuals on to the scheme. She finished by asking “will this Government call a halt to the roll-out of Universal Credit”.
Responding for the Government, Alok Sharma MP outlined new regulations for the migration of those with severe disabilities, a migration pilot capped at 10,000 transitions, and the cancellation of the proposed extension of the two-child policy.
He said that many stakeholders had welcomed the changes to Universal Credit announced last week, and blamed the former Labour government for leaving an “awful financial mess” and Labour opposition of funding initiatives in the last two budgets.

Transcripts of proceedings in the House of Commons Chamber are available in Hansard online three hours after they happen.
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MIL-OSI UK: Opposition press Government on managed migration of Universal Credit

Source: British Parliament News

08 January 2019
Shadow Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, Margaret Greenwood, asked the Government to provide an update on the managed migration of Universal Credit.

This follows the recent announcement from the Department for Work and Pensions that the rollout for Universal Credit would be moved to ten thousand claimants instead of the proposed three million claimants as originally planned.Minister of State for the Department for Work and Pensions, Alok Sharma, responded on behalf of the Government and stated the DWP had long planned to initially support ten thousand claimants through the process as a test phase before increasing the number of claimants. He went on to say that the test phase would provide an “opportunity to learn how to provide the best support whilst keeping Parliament fully informed”.
Transcripts of proceedings in the House of Commons Chamber are available in Hansard online three hours after they happen.
Image: Roger Harris
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MIL-OSI UK: Health and Social Care (National Data Guardian) Bill: Lords third reading

Source: British Parliament News

13 December 2018
The Health and Social Care (National Data Guardian) Bill had its third reading, a chance to ‘tidy up’ the bill and make changes, in the Lords on Wednesday 12 December.
This is a private member’s bill. A private member’s bill is a type of public bill (that affects the public). Private members’ bills must go through the same set of procedures as other public bills.

No changes were made at third reading.
As both Houses have agreed on the text of the bill it now awaits the final stage of Royal Assent when it will become an Act of Parliament (law).
A date for Royal Assent is yet to be scheduled.
Lords committee stage: Wednesday 28 November
This bill aims to establish, and make provision for, the National Data Guardian for Health and Social Care.
As no changes were suggested to the bill, a motion was agreed that both committee and report stages be dispensed with and that the bill progress directly to third reading. This procedure is known as ‘order of commitment discharged’.
Second reading
The Health and Social Care (National Data Guardian ) Bill had its second reading, the key debate on the draft law’s purpose and principles, on 26 October.
Lords news : Private members’ bills October 2018
Further information
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MIL-OSI UK: Lords debates challenges facing young people

Source: British Parliament News

12 December 2018
Members of the Lords, including a former lecturer in youth and community work at Sunderland Polytechnic and a former health education advisor for the Inner London Education Authority, will debate the challenges facing young people, in the House of Lords on Thursday 13 December.

This is a general debate. They normally take place on a Thursday in the chamber. During debates, members are able to put their experience to good use, discussing current issues and drawing the government’s attention to concerns.
The debate was proposed by Baroness Armstrong of Hill Top (Labour), former lecturer in youth and community work at Sunderland Polytechnic.
Members expected to take part include:
Earl of Listowel (Crossbench), board member and trustee of the Child and Family Practice Charitable Foundation
Baroness Massey of Darwen (Labour), former health education advisor for the Inner London Education Authority
Lord Norton of Louth (Conservative), ambassador for the Albert Kennedy Trust support organisation for homeless LGBT+ young people
Lord Storey (Liberal Democrat), former primary school head teacher and co-chair of the Liberal Democrat PPC on Education, Families and Young People
Lord Agnew of Oulton (Conservative), parliamentary under-secretary in the Department for Education, will respond on behalf of the government.
Further information
Image: iStockphoto

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MIL-OSI UK: Lords examines Tenant Fees Bill

Source: British Parliament News

10 December 2018
The Tenant Fees Bill has its report stage, a further chance to examine the bill and make changes, in the Lords on Tuesday 11 December.

Members are expected to discuss the transfer of deposits to a second landlord or agent, the approval and designation of  client money protection schemes and the requirement to belong to such a scheme.
Lords committee stage day two: Tuesday 20 November
Members discussed the early termination of tenancies and payments in respect of identity and immigration status checks.
Report stage, a further chance to examine the bill and make changes, is scheduled for 5 December.
Lords committee stage day one: Monday 5 November
The first day of committee stage of this bill took place in Grand Committee, a room outside the Lords chamber. In Grand Committee, any member can take part and decisions on amendments can be made, but no votes can take place.
Members discussed a range of subjects, including:
the government’s duty to provide tenants with guidance on the effects of this bill
the reimbursement of costs incurred by enforcement agencies in the exercise of their duties
the requirement of tenants to make payments to cover a landlord or agent’s loss due to a breach of the tenancy contract
Lords second reading: Wednesday 10 October
Members discussed unfair letting fees, compensation payments to tenants and home share schemes.
Lord Bourne of Aberystwyth (Conservative), parliamentary under-secretary in the Department for Housing, Communities and Local Government, responded on behalf of the government.
Tenant Fees Bill summary
This bill will aim to:
make renting fairer and more affordable for tenants by reducing the costs at the outset of a tenancy
improve transparency and competition in the private rental market
ban letting fees paid by tenants in England
improve fairness, competition and affordability in the lettings sector
Further information
Image: iStockphoto

MIL-OSI UK News