MIL-OSI Australia: Interview with Ross Greenwood, Today Show, Channel 9

Source: Australian Treasurer

Subjects: Economy; budget; Labor’s housing tax, and women in politics.

ROSS GREENWOOD:

Josh, just first up, let’s go to the economy and all of that type of thing. The Prime Minister here, last week, said there were economic headwinds. Does this mean that your ability to get the budget back into surplus, you will have a budget in April, of course, is that diminished by those economic headwinds that the Prime Minister is talking about? 

JOSH FRYDENBERG:

We will be delivering the first budget surplus in over a decade on April the 2nd. We have seen a record number of women in the workforce, we have seen a record number of young people get a job over the past year. And so, the fundamentals of the economy are strong and that has enabled us, Ross, to spend record amounts on education and health.

But, the Prime Minister is right, we are seeing globally China slow-down from its previous highs, Europe has been gripped by Brexit and those trade tensions between the US and China…

ROSS GREENWOOD:

But, also, house prices are falling here, construction is down, people aren’t spending as much money it would seem, aren’t they headwinds that really could affect the economy and that surplus?

JOSH FRYDENBERG:

There is a cooling of the housing market, but what we don’t want to see is the housing market to be hit with a new big tax, namely the plans to abolish negative gearing from our political opponents. So, that is a real danger.

ROSS GREENWOOD:

Ok, then the other thing about this also is, would you say that the Australian economy, if it is back in surplus, is robust, is it healthy? What sort of state is it in right now?

JOSH FRYDENBERG:

The fundamentals of the Australian economy are good, but the Prime Minister is absolutely right. We need to prepare for a winter day, we need to deal with these cold headwinds.  

ROSS GREENWOOD:

Okay, so, is it the problem that you say, yes, there might be some issues around the place, but its broadly healthy. Isn’t that at odds with what the family, listening here at home are saying. They’re seeing tight wages, they’re seeing falling house prices, they’re seeing higher electricity prices. So, therefore, your view of the economy might be different to the view of the economy of people who are sitting here, watching it at home?   

JOSH FRYDENBERG:

Well, certainly the lived experience of Australians right across the country is of energy prices that are too high and we have also seen the impact of the drought.
But, we have also seen record job creation, much lower than when we came to Government and that is an important point.  

ROSS GREENWOOD:

Your side of politics, does it have a female problem? Kelly O’Dwyer has quit, there are obviously issues in terms of other female representatives who are not there anymore. Is there a problem with women inside the Coalition?

JOSH FRYDENBERG:

We want to see more women in our parliamentary party, but we’ve also got outstanding women in the team right now. We’ve got the first female…   

ROSS GREENWOOD:

But, the question is whether there is enough, that is the whole point.

JOSH FRYDENBERG:

Well, we want to see more and actually at this election, we’ve got a number of very strong female candidates in important seats that we must win.   

ROSS GREENWOOD:

Alright, that you must win. And that’s going to be the key going into the thing. I want to take you into your tennis career, were you any good?

JOSH FRYDENBERG:

My ambitions were far greater than my talents, Rossco.  

ROSS GREENWOOD:

Okay, but you took a year off during your gap year to have a crack at the satellite tour, what was that like?

JOSH FRYDENBERG:

It was great, travelled the world. Had a few losses, had a few wins. But the point is, I got to fulfil my dream. I didn’t want to finish school, actually.   

ROSS GREENWOOD:

Is it true that you beat Mark Philippoussis in a doubles match, is that right?

JOSH FRYDENBERG:

Yeah, I did, and it went to a tie-break with Pat Rafter up in Queensland…

ROSS GREENWOOD:

And did you beat him there?

JOSH FRYDENBERG:

No, he took the honours…

ROSS GREENWOOD:

So you were that good, in other words you could actually be on the same court with these sort of fellows at that time in your life?

JOSH FRYDENBERG:

On the same court, but not necessarily winning.  

ROSS GREENWOOD:

Nah that’s right. So, in terms of tennis, you also were an Oxford Blue twice, you played for Oxford University. You travelled the world with them, so you know, you’ve actually played some reasonable tennis.

JOSH FRYDENBERG:

Well, now I eat for a living, as you know, Ross…

ROSS GREENWOOD:

That’s right. Are you a better tennis player or Treasurer?

JOSH FRYDENBERG:

Well, I hope to be good at both.

ROSS GREENWOOD:

Let’s have a crack, let’s see how good he was. Treasurer, The Josh Frydenberg here, on the people’s court.
Have a bit of a go at this Josh.

JOSH FRYDENBERG:

Ok.

ROSS GREENWOOD:

Look at this, here is a bit of action from last night. Here we go. Well, that’s not me.

JOSH FRYDENBERG:

Ross, bend the knees Ross.

ROSS GREENWOOD:

C’mon on Josh, oh look at this, it’s going well, isn’t it. Well there’s the Treasurer going, oh look, there we go.

JOSH FRYDENBERG:

So, are you going to teach Ash Barty a thing or two Rossco?

ROSS GREENWOOD:

Well, I’m not going to teach Ash Barty anything, except the cricket I would have thought. But, how about you Josh? Now are you still any good as a seniors vet tennis player, Josh?

JOSH FRYDENBERG:

Ah well, I try to get on the court a bit. But, it is fantastic to see so many Australians come out to the open. It is a really national event.

ROSS GREENWOOD:

The Treasurer, I got to tell you, the Treasurer Josh Frydenberg. He is the Treasurer and also a tennis player as well. Well done Josh.

JOSH FRYDENBERG:

Thanks Ross, great to see you.

MIL OSI Australia

MIL-OSI UK: Commons Finance (No.3) Bill: remaining stages

Source: British Parliament News

12 November 2018
MPs debate the Finance (No. 3) Bill 2017-19 in a committee of the whole House in the Commons over two days on 19 and 20 November 2018.

Commons committee stage
The committee stage of the Finance (No. 3) Bill took place over two days. It was considered in a committee of the whole House, as are all Finance Bills.
On the first day of debate, the House of Commons divided on two amendments to the Bill, rejecting both. On the second day, debate was opened by the Exchequer Secretary to the Treasury, Robert Jenrick, and the Commons did not divide.
Commons second reading
Debate was opened by the Financial Secretary to the Treasury, Mel Stride, who stated that “is the Conservative party that has once again [that has brought our country back from the brink and into better times.”
MPs debated one amendment, moved by Labour MP Peter Dowd. This amendment declined to give the Bill a second reading on the grounds that the 2018 Budget it was derived from “confirmed the continuation of austerity and tax cuts for the wealthiest, [and] failed to introduce a fair taxation system which protects middle and low earners.”
The House divided twice during second reading: They voted down the amendment moved on the Bill, before passing second reading.
Watch the debate on the Finance (No.3) Bill, or read the second reading debate below.
The Finance Bill
Each year the Chancellor of the Exchequer presents the Budget, which contains all the tax measures for the year ahead. The statutory provisions to give effect to these tax measures are set out in the annual Finance Bill. 
Summary of the Bill
The Finance Bill aims to:
Grant certain duties and alter other duties
Amend the law relating to the national debt and the public revenue
Make further provision in connection with finance
Keep up to date with all the proceedings and documentation, including amendment papers, on the Finance Bill and find out how a Bill becomes an Act of Parliament.
House of Commons Library analysis
The House of Commons Library produces briefing papers to inform MPs and their staff of key issues. The papers contain factual information and a range of opinions on each subject, and aim to be politically impartial.
Image: PC
Follow the @HouseofCommons on Twitter for updates on the UK House of Commons Chamber.
Please fill in our quick feedback survey to help us improve our news content.

MIL-OSI UK News

MIL-OSI UK: Lords examines Financial Services (Implementation of Legislation) Bill

Source: British Parliament News

07 January 2019
The Financial Services (Implementation of Legislation) Bill will have its committee stage, the first chance for line-by-line scrutiny, in the Lords on Tuesday 8 January.

Members are expected to discuss a range of subjects, including:
limiting the new regulations to ensure there are no changes in government policy other than to reflect the UK’s status as a non-EU member
ensuring the competitiveness of UK financial markets is not affected by EU withdrawal
requiring HM Treasury to begin reporting on the use of its powers by October 2019 and every six months thereafter.
Baroness McDonagh (Labour) has laid a motion against the debate, recommending that committee stage of the bill be postponed until after the scheduled date for the Lords committee stage of the Trade Bill has been published in the House of Lords Business Paper.
Lords second reading: Tuesday 4 December
Members discussed a range of issues raised by the bill, including restrictions within the EU (Withdrawal) Act 2018 on the use of delegated legislation, the accurate number of ‘in flight’ pieces of EU legislation and shortening the bill’s regulatory period following a ‘no deal’ scenario down from the current twelve-month proposal.
Lord Bates (Conservative), minister of state in the Department for International Development, responded on behalf of the government.
Financial Services (Implementation of Legislation) Bill summary
This bill will aim to provide the government with powers to implement and make changes to ‘in flight’ files of EU financial services legislation. The powers will last for two years after UK withdrawal from the EU, in the event of a ‘no-deal’ scenario.
‘In flight’ refers to pieces of EU legislation that:
have been adopted by the EU but not yet enacted, and so would not apply under the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018
are currently in negotiation and may be adopted up to two years following EU withdrawal
Further information
Image: iStockphoto

MIL-OSI UK News

MIL-OSI UK: How green was the Budget?

Source: British Parliament News

12 December 2018
The Environmental Audit Committee holds a one-off session to scrutinise the green credentials of the Government’s proposals for tax changes and spending commitments outlined in the 2018 Budget, as well as asking what the Government missed out in light of the Clean Growth Strategy.

Witnesses
Wednesday 12 December 2018, Thatcher Room, Portcullis House
At 14.15
Nick Molho, Executive Director, Aldersgate Group
Julian Kirby, Lead Plastics-Free Campaigner, Friends of the Earth
Josh Burke, Policy Fellow, UK Climate and Energy Policy, Grantham Research Institute  
At 15.15
Robert Jenrick MP, Exchequer Secretary, HM Treasury
Philip Duffy, Director, Enterprise and Growth Unit, HM Treasury
Neil Kenward, Deputy Director, Energy, Environment and Agriculture, HM Treasury
Anne-Therese Farmer, Deputy Director, Energy and Transport Tax, HM Treasury
The Budget has been criticised for being light on environmental commitments. In particular, the absence of a latte levy, a 25p charge on disposable cups, has been a surprise to the Committee.
MPs inquired into the matter last year, and their recommendations for a disposable cups charge followed the successful introduction of a charge on plastic bags, which saw significant reductions in their usage. Government plans to consult on a single-use plastics tax, as well as frozen fuel duty are also likely to be considered during the evidence session.
Further information

MIL-OSI UK News