MIL-OSI UK: Lords debates digital techology and young people

Source: British House Of Lords News

16 January 2019
Members of the Lords, including the chair of children’s digital rights charity 5Rights and a vice president of Barnardos, will debate the relationship between the use of digital technology and the health and wellbeing of children and young people, in the House of Lords on Thursday 17 January.

This is a general debate. They normally take place on a Thursday in the chamber. During debates, members are able to put their experience to good use, discussing current issues and drawing the government’s attention to concerns.
The debate was proposed by Baroness Kidron (Crossbench), chair of children’s digital rights charity 5Rights.
Members expected to take part include:
Baroness Benjamin (Liberal Democrat), broadcaster and vice president of Barnardos
Lord Griffiths of Burry Port (Labour), Lords opposition spokesperson for digital, culture, media and sport
Earl of Listowel (Crossbench), trustee of child welfare charity The Michael Sieff Foundation
Lord Lucas (Conservative), vice chair of the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Digital Identity
Lord Ashton of Hyde (Conservative), parliamentary under-secretary in the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, will respond on behalf of the government.
Further information
Image: iStockphoto

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MIL-OSI UK: Tenant Fees Bill: Lords third reading

Source: British Parliament News

14 January 2019
The Tenant Fees Bill has its third reading, a chance to ‘tidy up’ the bill and make changes, in the Lords on Tuesday 15 January.

Members are expected to discuss two amendments relating to interest payments owed by landlords or letting agents to enforcement authorities.
Lords report stage: Tuesday 11 December
Members discussed the acceptance of multiple holding deposits for the same property, the approval and designation of client money protection schemes and the requirement to belong to such a scheme.
Lords committee stage day two: Tuesday 20 November
Members discussed the early termination of tenancies and payments in respect of identity and immigration status checks.
Report stage, a further chance to examine the bill and make changes, is scheduled for 5 December.
Lords committee stage day one: Monday 5 November
The first day of committee stage of this bill took place in Grand Committee, a room outside the Lords chamber. In Grand Committee, any member can take part and decisions on amendments can be made, but no votes can take place.
Members discussed a range of subjects, including:
the government’s duty to provide tenants with guidance on the effects of this bill
the reimbursement of costs incurred by enforcement agencies in the exercise of their duties
the requirement of tenants to make payments to cover a landlord or agent’s loss due to a breach of the tenancy contract
Lords second reading: Wednesday 10 October
Members discussed unfair letting fees, compensation payments to tenants and home share schemes.
Lord Bourne of Aberystwyth (Conservative), parliamentary under-secretary in the Department for Housing, Communities and Local Government, responded on behalf of the government.
Tenant Fees Bill summary
This bill will aim to:
make renting fairer and more affordable for tenants by reducing the costs at the outset of a tenancy
improve transparency and competition in the private rental market
ban letting fees paid by tenants in England
improve fairness, competition and affordability in the lettings sector
Further information
Image: iStockphoto

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MIL-OSI UK: Voyeurism (Offences) (No. 2) Bill: Lords third reading

Source: British Parliament News

14 January 2019
The Voyeurism (Offences) (No.2) Bill has its third reading, a chance to ‘tidy up’ the bill and make changes, in the Lords on Tuesday 15 January.

No changes have yet been suggested to the bill ahead of third reading. Members may discuss the progress of the bill at the conclusion of its Lords stages.
If no changes are made, then both Houses will have agreed on the text of the bill and it will await Royal Assent, when it will become an Act of Parliament (law).
Lords report stage: Tuesday 18 December
No changes were suggested to the bill ahead of report stage.
Third reading, a chance to ‘tidy up’ the bill and make changes, is yet to be scheduled.
Lords committee stage: Monday 26 November
Members discussed the recording of images which invade the privacy of persons and disclosure of images for the purposes of preventing or detecting crime.
Lords second reading: Tuesday 23 October
Members discussed a number of issues raised by the bill, including the online sharing of non-consensual intimate images, the targeting of vulnerable victims and the current Law Commission review into the classification of misogyny and misandry as hate crimes.
Lord Keen of Elie (Conservative), Lords spokesperson in the Ministry of Justice, responded on behalf of the government.
Voyeurism (Offences) (No. 2) Bill summary
This bill will aim to insert two new offences in the Sexual Offences Act 2003 to cover the practice known colloquially as ‘upskirting’.
The new offences would apply in instances when:
without consent, an individual operates equipment or records an image beneath a person’s clothing to observe their genitalia or buttocks, whether covered or uncovered by underwear garments
the offender has a motive of either obtaining sexual gratification or causing humiliation, distress or alarm to the victim.
The bill would also ensure that the most serious offenders, where the purpose of the offence is for sexual gratification, are made subject to notification requirements (often referred to as being placed on the ‘sex offenders register’).
Further information
Image: iStockphoto

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MIL-OSI UK: Lords debates contribution of free schools

Source: British Parliament News

09 January 2019
Members of the Lords, including the a former trustee of the National Literacy Trust and the chair of the Strategy Board at the Institute of Effective Education, will debate the contribution made by free schools to improving educational standards, in the House of Lords on Thursday 10 January.

This is a general debate. During debates, members are able to put their experience to good use, discussing current issues and drawing the government’s attention to concerns.
This debate will take place in the Moses Room, a room outside the Lords chamber used to host extra work. Any member can attend and participate, as with debates in the Lords chamber.
The debate was proposed by Lord Nash (Conservative), director of Future Academies educational charity and multi-academy trust.
Members expected to take part include:
Earl Listowel (Crossbench), officer of the All Party Parliamentary Group on the Teaching Profession
Lord Hill of Oareford (Conservative), former trustee of the National Literacy Trust
Baroness Morris of Yardley (Labour), former teacher and chair of the Strategy Board at the Institute of Effective Education, University of York
Lord Storey (Liberal Democrat), former primary school headteacher and Lords Liberal Democrat spokesperson for education  
Lord Agnew of Oulton (Conservative), parliamentary under-secretary in the Department for Education, will respond on behalf of the government.
Further information
Image: iStockphoto

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MIL-OSI UK: Ministers questioned on inequalities faced by Gypsy Roma and Traveller communities

Source: British House of Commons News

08 January 2019
The Women and Equalities Committee questions ministers from three Government Departments about the inequalities experienced by Gypsy Roma and Traveller (GRT) communities. This is the final evidence session of the inquiry.

Purpose of the session
Areas likely to be covered include:
Who holds responsibility for various aspects of Gypsy Roma and Traveller welfare
Whether the ministerial working group commitments in 2012 are still relevant in ministerial thinking
Whether there is any joined-up strategising across departments to try to tackle inequalities, especially in light of the Race Disparity Audit
Whether changes in policy in various areas have been have been having any significant impact on the lives of Gypsy Roma and Traveller people
How data collection can be improved and what ministers plan to do to implement necessary changes.
Witnesses
Wednesday 9 January, Room 6, Palace of Westminster.
At 09.50am:
Lord Bourne of Aberystwyth, Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government)
Jackie Doyle-Price MP, Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department of Health)
Nadhim Zahawi MP, Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Education)
Further information

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MIL-OSI UK: Committee considers social care workforce

Source: British Parliament News

07 January 2019
The Economic Affairs Committee takes evidence on social care workforce challenges from Skills for Care, the Social Care Workforce Research Unit and UNISON.

Witnesses
Tuesday 8 January in Committee Room 1, Palace of WestminsterAt 3.35pm.
Sharon Allen OBE, CEO, Skills for Care
Guy Collis, Policy Officer, UNISON
Professor Jill Manthorpe, Director, NIHR Social Care Workforce Research Unit
Likely Questions
Despite warnings about social care approaching a ‘tipping point’, the system appears to have been resilient to date. Why is this?
Are there regional differences in the quality and availability of social care? Can these be overcome?
The Migration Advisory Committee recently reported that providing an easier route for migrants into social care would not help with recruitment problems in the sector. Do you agree?
Why are there high vacancy and turnover rates in social care and how can they be reduced?
Does social care need to become more of a profession and how can the career path for social carers be improved?
Do the public understand how to navigate the social care system? What makes the system complex to navigate for those who require care and their families?
Further Information
Image: iStockphoto

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MIL-OSI UK: Divorce (Financial Provision) Bill: Lords third reading

Source: British Parliament News

20 December 2018
The Divorce (Financial Provisions) Bill had its third reading, a chance to ‘tidy up’ the bill and make changes, in the Lords on Wednesday 19 December.
This is a private member’s bill. A private member’s bill is a type of public bill (that affects the public). Private members’ bills must go through the same set of procedures as other public bills.

This bill aims to amend the Matrimonial Causes Act 1973 in connection with financial settlements following divorce.
No changes were made at third reading.
Following completion of third reading, the bill now goes to the House of Commons for its consideration.
Lords committee stage: Friday 23 November
As no changes were suggested to the bill, a motion was agreed to that both committee and report stages be dispensed with and that the bill progress directly to third reading. This procedure is known as ‘order of commitment discharged’.
Lords second reading: Friday 11 May
The Divorce (Financial Provisions) Bill had its second reading, the key debate on the draft law’s purpose and principles, on 11 May 2018.
Further information
Image: House of Lords 2018 / Photography by Roger Harris

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MIL-OSI UK: Lords debates Islamophobia in the UK

Source: British Parliament News

19 December 2018
Members of the Lords, including the chair of the National Commission on Muslim Women and the former deputy chair of the Commission for Racial Equality, will debate the impact of Islamophobia in the United Kingdom, in the House of Lords on Thursday 20 December.

This is a balloted debate. They normally take place on a Thursday in the chamber. During debates, members are able to put their experience to good use, discussing current issues and drawing the government’s attention to concerns.
The debate was proposed by Lord Sheikh (Conservative), vice chair of the All Party Parliamentary Group on Race and Community.
Members expected to take part include:
Baroness Afshar (Crossbench), chair of the Communication Committee at the British Muslim Research Centre
Baroness Burt of Solihull (Liberal Democrat), former shadow Secretary of State for Equalities
Lord Parekh (Labour), former deputy chair of the Commission for Racial Equality
Baroness Uddin (Non-affiliated), chair of the National Commission on Muslim Women
Baroness Warsi (Conservative), treasurer of the All Party Parliamentary Group on British Muslims
Lord Bourne of Aberystwyth (Conservative), parliamentary under-secretary in the Department for Housing, Communities and Local Government, will respond on behalf of the government.
Further information
Image: iStockphoto

MIL-OSI UK News

MIL-OSI UK: Lords debates Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse

Source: British Parliament News

19 December 2018
Members of the Lords, including the shadow attorney general and a former Deputy Assistant Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Service, will debate the remit of, and arrangements for the handling of evidence by, the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse, in the House of Lords on Thursday 20 December.

This is a balloted debate. They normally take place on a Thursday in the chamber. During debates, members are able to put their experience to good use, discussing current issues and drawing the government’s attention to concerns.
The debate was proposed by Lord Campbell-Savours (Labour), former member of the parliamentary Joint Committee on the Draft Charities Bill 2004-05.
Members expected to take part include:
Baroness Chakrabarti (Labour), shadow attorney general and council member of law reform and human rights organisation JUSTICE
Lord Hunt of Wirral (Conservative), chair of the All Party Parliamentary Group on Legal and Constitutional Affairs 
Lord Paddick (Liberal Democrat), former Deputy Assistant Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Service
Baroness Barran (Conservative), government whip, will respond on behalf of the government.
Further information
Image: iStockphoto

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MIL-OSI UK: Lords examines Voyeurism (Offences) (No. 2) Bill

Source: British Parliament News

19 December 2018
The Voyeurism (Offences) (No.2) Bill had its report stage, a further chance to examine the bill and make changes, in the Lords on Tuesday 18 December.

No changes were suggested to the bill ahead of report stage.
Third reading, a chance to ‘tidy up’ the bill and make changes, is yet to be scheduled.
Lords committee stage: Monday 26 November
Members discussed the recording of images which invade the privacy of persons and disclosure of images for the purposes of preventing or detecting crime.
Lords second reading: Tuesday 23 October
Members discussed a number of issues raised by the bill, including the online sharing of non-consensual intimate images, the targeting of vulnerable victims and the current Law Commission review into the classification of misogyny and misandry as hate crimes.
Lord Keen of Elie (Conservative), Lords spokesperson in the Ministry of Justice, responded on behalf of the government.
Voyeurism (Offences) (No. 2) Bill summary
This bill will aim to insert two new offences in the Sexual Offences Act 2003 to cover the practice known colloquially as ‘upskirting’.
The new offences would apply in instances when:
without consent, an individual operates equipment or records an image beneath a person’s clothing to observe their genitalia or buttocks, whether covered or uncovered by underwear garments
the offender has a motive of either obtaining sexual gratification or causing humiliation, distress or alarm to the victim.
The bill would also ensure that the most serious offenders, where the purpose of the offence is for sexual gratification, are made subject to notification requirements (often referred to as being placed on the ‘sex offenders register’).
Further information
Image: iStockphoto

MIL-OSI UK News