MIL-OSI Submissions: Recent migrants say they face bias, but feel safe – Stats NZ Media Release



Recent migrants say they face bias, but feel safe  – Media release

17 January 2019

Recent migrants to New Zealand are more likely to feel discriminated against than people born in New Zealand and long-term migrants who have been here for five or more years, Stats NZ said today.

“Recent migrants, those who’ve lived here less than five years, are also less likely to feel it’s easy to be themselves in New Zealand than long-term migrants and New Zealand-born people,” labour market and household statistics senior manager Jason Attewell said.

According to the 2016 General Social Survey (GSS), about 26 percent of recent migrants said they’d felt discriminated against in the previous 12 months, compared with about 16 percent for both long-term migrants, and people born in New Zealand.

“Newer migrants were more trusting of other people, and also felt safer than long-term migrants and New Zealand-born people,” Mr Attewell said.

On average, recent migrants rated their trust in most New Zealand people at 7.5 (0–10 scale, with 0 being ‘no trust at all’). In contrast, this rating was 7.2 for long-term migrants and 6.7 for people born in New Zealand.

The GSS is the official measure of social well-being in New Zealand; it asks more than 8,000 people how they feel about life. In the 2016 GSS, 30 percent of people living in New Zealand were migrants, with the balance being born in the country. Five percent of the total New Zealand population were recent migrants.

Recent migrants feel safer in their neighbourhood than other groups

Compared with long-term migrants and people born in New Zealand, recent migrants were more likely to feel safe using or waiting for public transport at night, and when walking alone in their neighbourhood after dark. This was particularly the case for people aged 25 to 44 years, who made up two-thirds of the recent migrant group.

A significantly larger proportion of recent female migrants felt safe using public transport and walking alone after dark when compared with women born in New Zealand. When using public transport at night, 57 percent of recent female migrants said they felt safe or very safe compared with 30 percent for New Zealand-born women.

The differences in feeling safe between women and men were also smaller for recent migrants when compared with people born in New Zealand.

The type of neighbourhood people lived in had a strong association with how safe people felt. People from more deprived areas were less likely to feel safe; 32 percent of recent migrants lived in the most deprived areas in New Zealand. This compares with 27 percent of long-term migrants and 29 percent of New Zealand-born people living in these areas.

“Recent migrants always felt safer than other people living in the same area, regardless of how deprived the area was,” Mr Attewell said. “This could be because some recent migrants feel New Zealand is a safer place to live than where they originally came from.”

This information comes from the GSS we conducted between 2016 and 2017. Survey data is progressively released over time, as we analyse different aspects.

We will publish data from the 2018 GSS from June 2019.

For more information about these statistics:

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MIL-OSI Submissions: Dairy cattle numbers dip again – Stats NZ Media and Information Release: Agricultural production statistics: June 2018 (provisional)



Dairy cattle numbers dip again – Media release

17 January 2019

The number of dairy cattle has dipped for the second year, while beef cattle numbers increased strongly in 2018, Stats NZ said today.

Provisional figures from the 2018 agricultural production census showed dairy cattle numbers fell 1 percent, to 6.4 million in June 2018.

“This followed a similar small dip in 2017, though overall dairy cattle numbers have been relatively steady since 2012,” agricultural production statistics manager Stuart Pitts said.

Total dairy cattle were at their highest level in 2014 at 6.7 million.

“Dairy products are a huge export for New Zealand. The value of milk powder, butter, and cheese exports for the year ended June 2018 was 14.1 billion.”

Beef cattle numbers rose for the second year in a row, up 5 percent to 3.8 million in 2018.

Total sheep numbers eased again in 2018, down 1 percent to 27.3 million.

“Sheep numbers have fallen in 10 of the past 12 years, in total down about 12.8 million from about 40.1 million in 2006,” Mr Pitts said.

“New Zealand now has 5.6 sheep for every person, after peaking at 22 sheep for every person in 1982.”

Stock units decline since 1990

A large fall in sheep and beef cattle numbers since 1990 means overall stock units have fallen in the past 28 years, despite a rise in dairy cattle numbers.

A ‘stock unit’ means different types of animals can be compared, based on the food they eat and how much they weigh.

The stock unit is based on the annual feed needed for a 55kg ewe rearing a single lamb. A dairy cow is the equivalent of about seven ewes, so is counted as seven stock units, compared with just one stock unit for a ewe.

In 1990 there were 100 million stock units in total, more than half of those sheep, with most of the rest in beef and dairy cattle. Deer make up a small part of the total.

By 2004, total stock unit numbers fell to 94 million and in 2018 that was down to 86 million.

“The large drop in stock units since 1990 mainly reflects a halving in sheep numbers, down from 53 million stock units to 25 million,” Mr Pitts said. “In the same period, dairy stock units almost doubled to 41 million. By 2018 dairy cattle made up almost half of all livestock units.”

The Ministry for Primary Industries’ latest report, updated 11 January 2019, showed that about 52,000 dairy cattle have been culled as part of the response to Mycoplasma bovis.

For more information about these statistics:

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MIL-OSI Submissions: Quiet quarter in retail card spending – Stats NZ Media and Information Release: Electronic card transactions: December 2018



Quiet quarter in retail card spending – Media release

16 January 2019

Retail card spending was quiet in the December 2018 quarter, Stats NZ said today.

When adjusted for seasonal effects, retail card spending was down 0.2 percent in the December 2018 quarter. This followed a 2.1 percent rise in the September 2018 quarter.

“The dip in the December 2018 quarter came after a strong September quarter,” retail statistics manager Sue Chapman said.

Spending rose in four of the six retail industries. The largest movement was in the fuel industry, down $92 million (4.7 percent). This was followed by the food and liquor retailing or ‘consumables’ industry, up $62 million (1.0 percent).

“The fall in the fuel industry coincided with petrol prices falling from record highs,” Ms Chapman said. “By the end of the December quarter, petrol prices had come down nearly 40 cents a litre.”

Core retail spending (which excludes the vehicle-related industries) rose 0.5 percent, after a 1.9 percent rise in the September 2018 quarter.

Actual retail spending using electronic cards was $18 billion in the December quarter, up $616 million (3.5 percent) from the December 2017 quarter.

Retail spending down in December month

When adjusted for seasonal effects, retail spending fell 2.3 percent in the December 2018 month, after a 0.5 percent fall in the November 2018 month.

“Growth in December was softer than usual, so in seasonally adjusted terms we are seeing lower sales as a result,” Ms Chapman said.

Spending fell in four of the six retail industries. The largest fall came from the durables industry, (including electronics, whiteware, hardware, and furniture) down $58 million (4.4 percent), followed by the fuel industry, down $50 million (8.0 percent).

Sales of durables were down 4.4 percent in December – the largest seasonally adjusted decrease in the industry since October 2010.

“Spending on fuel also fell sharply in December, but those savings at the pump don’t appear to have leaked across to other retail industries,” Ms Chapman said.

Sales of clothes and shoes were also lower, down 2.1 percent in December, although monthly sales in this industry are often volatile. Spending on hospitality was flat in December and sales of supermarket food and drink (consumables) were up only 0.6 percent.

Core retail spending (which excludes the vehicle-related industries) fell 1.5 percent in December 2018, after a 0.3 percent rise in November.

The total value of electronic card spending, including the two non-retail categories (services and non-retail), fell 1.9 percent in December 2018. This follows a 0.3 percent fall in November.

In actual terms, retail spending using electronic cards was $6.8 billion, up $40 million (0.6 percent) from December 2017.

Values are only available at the national level and are not adjusted for price changes.

For more information about these statistics:

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MIL-OSI Submissions: Shopping malls and convention centres drive commercial building consents – Stats NZ Media and Information Release: Building consents issued: November 2018



Shopping malls and convention centres drive commercial building consents – Media release

11 January 2019

Building consents for big commercial buildings, including shopping malls and convention centres, increased strongly in the year ended November 2018, Stats NZ said today.

The value of building consents issued for shops, restaurants, and bars; social and cultural buildings; factories; and farm buildings all increased between $100 million and $300 million over the period.  

“An increase in the intention to build more shops and social buildings was partly due to large consents for Auckland and Christchurch convention centres, and shopping malls in Auckland,” construction statistics manager Melissa McKenzie said.

“Construction costs rise each year, but even accounting for price rises, there was a significant increase in the value of shops and social buildings consented in the year ended November.”  

Non-residential consents issued exceeded $7 billion for the first time on record in the year ended November 2018.

The value of offices and public transport buildings consented for the year had the largest fall, down $351 million from the November 2017 year.

For more information about these statistics:

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MIL-OSI Submissions: Almost 33,000 homes consented in November year – Stats NZ Media and Information Release: Building consents issued: November 2018



Almost 33,000 homes consented in November year – Media release

11 January 2019

Almost 33,000 new homes were consented in the year ended November 2018, up 5.3 percent from the November 2017 year, Stats NZ said today.

Auckland drove the increase in new homes consented, followed by Wellington. A total of 32,783 new homes were consented in the year ended November 2018.

“Stand-alone houses accounted for nearly two-thirds of new homes consented in the year ended November,” construction statistics manager Melissa McKenzie said. “We saw a sustained increase in apartments, as well as townhouses, flats, and units, particularly in Auckland.”

In the Auckland region, 12,800 new homes were consented in the year ended November 2018, down slightly from 13,078 in the year ended October 2018.

The number of new homes consented fell a seasonally adjusted 2.0 percent in the November month, following a 1.4 percent increase in October.

For more information about these statistics:

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MIL-OSI Submissions: Stats NZ Information Release: Dwelling and household estimates: December 2018 quarter



Dwelling and household estimates: December 2018 quarter

9 January 2019

Dwelling and household estimates provide estimates of all private dwellings in New Zealand at a given date, and estimates of all households usually living in New Zealand at a given date. 

See Dwelling and household estimates: December 2018 quarter on our website or download the attached Excel.

For more information about these statistics:

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MIL-OSI New Zealand: Recent migrants say they face bias, but feel safe – Stats NZ Media Release

Source: MIL-OSI Submissions



Recent migrants say they face bias, but feel safe  – Media release

17 January 2019

Recent migrants to New Zealand are more likely to feel discriminated against than people born in New Zealand and long-term migrants who have been here for five or more years, Stats NZ said today.

“Recent migrants, those who’ve lived here less than five years, are also less likely to feel it’s easy to be themselves in New Zealand than long-term migrants and New Zealand-born people,” labour market and household statistics senior manager Jason Attewell said.

According to the 2016 General Social Survey (GSS), about 26 percent of recent migrants said they’d felt discriminated against in the previous 12 months, compared with about 16 percent for both long-term migrants, and people born in New Zealand.

“Newer migrants were more trusting of other people, and also felt safer than long-term migrants and New Zealand-born people,” Mr Attewell said.

On average, recent migrants rated their trust in most New Zealand people at 7.5 (0–10 scale, with 0 being ‘no trust at all’). In contrast, this rating was 7.2 for long-term migrants and 6.7 for people born in New Zealand.

The GSS is the official measure of social well-being in New Zealand; it asks more than 8,000 people how they feel about life. In the 2016 GSS, 30 percent of people living in New Zealand were migrants, with the balance being born in the country. Five percent of the total New Zealand population were recent migrants.

Recent migrants feel safer in their neighbourhood than other groups

Compared with long-term migrants and people born in New Zealand, recent migrants were more likely to feel safe using or waiting for public transport at night, and when walking alone in their neighbourhood after dark. This was particularly the case for people aged 25 to 44 years, who made up two-thirds of the recent migrant group.

A significantly larger proportion of recent female migrants felt safe using public transport and walking alone after dark when compared with women born in New Zealand. When using public transport at night, 57 percent of recent female migrants said they felt safe or very safe compared with 30 percent for New Zealand-born women.

The differences in feeling safe between women and men were also smaller for recent migrants when compared with people born in New Zealand.

The type of neighbourhood people lived in had a strong association with how safe people felt. People from more deprived areas were less likely to feel safe; 32 percent of recent migrants lived in the most deprived areas in New Zealand. This compares with 27 percent of long-term migrants and 29 percent of New Zealand-born people living in these areas.

“Recent migrants always felt safer than other people living in the same area, regardless of how deprived the area was,” Mr Attewell said. “This could be because some recent migrants feel New Zealand is a safer place to live than where they originally came from.”

This information comes from the GSS we conducted between 2016 and 2017. Survey data is progressively released over time, as we analyse different aspects.

We will publish data from the 2018 GSS from June 2019.

For more information about these statistics:

MIL OSI New Zealand

MIL-OSI Submissions: Near-record imports in November despite fewer imported cars – Stats NZ Information Release: Overseas merchandise trade: November 2018

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Near-record imports in November despite fewer imported cars – 20 December 2018

Monthly imports remain at high levels, despite lower imports of cars and aircraft in November 2018, Stats NZ said today.

However, monthly goods imports values were little changed from the November month of the previous year, down $36 million (0.6 percent) to $5.8 billion.

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In November, the largest fall was in passenger motor cars, down $178 million (35 percent) from November 2017.

Car imports were the most affected commodity by the delay in final unloading of one cargo ship in November.

“In a repeat of events in February this year, another vessel was ordered to leave New Zealand waters in November due to the discovery of stink bugs,” international statistics manager Tehseen Islam said.

“The goods on this vessel would normally have been included in November’s import statistics but will now be included in the statistics for the month when the goods are unloaded.”

Cargo ship ordered to leave New Zealand has more information on the discovery of stink bugs on this vessel.

After some car shipments were blocked in February, car imports bounced back in the following months.

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Aircraft and parts were the next largest fall, down $143 million from the same month last year. Aircraft imports are irregular and can mean large rises or falls in monthly figures.

The falls in imports were offset by rises across a range of other commodities, including fertilisers, soya bean oil cake, and palm oil cake.

Exports rise in November

Monthly goods exports were up $326 million (7.1 percent) from November 2017 to $4.9 billion.

Exports of aluminium and beef were the leading contributors to the rise in exports.

Exports of aluminium were up $59 million from November 2017 due to unusually low values and quantities in November 2017. The monthly value in November 2018 ($101 million) was at a level similar to recent months.

Beef rose $51 million from November 2017, led by an increase of $32 million to China.

Milk powder, butter, and cheese, our largest commodity group, rose $30 million (2.1 percent).

“There were contrasting movements in dairy product commodities in November,” Mr Islam said. “Milk powder was up, whereas exports of butter were down by a similar amount.”

There was an increase in exports to most of our top export destinations, the largest of these rises were to China (up $220 million), and USA (up $96 million).

Trade deficit in November

The monthly trade balance in November was a deficit of $861 million, with:

  • total goods exports at $4.9 billion
  • total goods imports at $5.8 billion.

The annual trade balance for the year ended November 2018 was a deficit of $5.4 billion, with:

  • total goods exports at $57.5 billion
  • total goods imports at $63.0 billion.

The Government Statistician authorises all statistics and data we publish.

For more information about these statistics:

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MIL-OSI Submissions: GDP growth dampens in the September quarter – Stats NZ Information Release: Gross domestic product: September 2018 quarter

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GDP growth dampens in the September quarter – 20 December 2018

Gross domestic product (GDP) rose 0.3 percent in the September 2018 quarter, down from 1.0 percent in the previous quarter, Stats NZ said today.

The latest growth is the lowest quarterly growth rate since December 2013.

Growth was mixed, with 11 of the 16 industries recording higher production in the September 2018 quarter.

“Primary industries grew 2.2 percent, while growth in service industries slowed to 0.5 percent. The goods-producing industries fell 1.0 percent, dragging down overall growth this quarter,” national accounts senior manager Susan Hollows said.

“Construction activity fell as repair work winds down on roads damaged in the Kaikōura earthquake. However, residential and non-residential construction continued to grow steadily.

“The largest contribution to the downturn in goods-producing industries was manufacturing, with food manufacturing down significantly,” Mrs Hollows said.

Growth in the service industries was widespread but moderate, with no industries having strong movements.

In the primary industries, increases in mining, and forestry and logging led growth. Offsetting the increase in primary industries was a fall in agriculture after rising strongly in the June 2018 quarter.

Mining rose 12 percent, partly recovering from the sharp fall in the June quarter. Oil, gas, and coal production all increased. The Pohokura gas field outage contributed to the large fall in June. The field was still operating at limited capacity, which constrained the bounce back in mining.

GDP per capita was flat in the September 2018 quarter, following an increase of 0.5 percent in the June 2018 quarter.

Annual GDP growth for the year ended September 2018 was 3.0 percent.

The size of the economy in current prices was $291 billion, for the September 2018 year.

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Text alternative for Size of the economy (GDP), for the September 2018 year

Diagram shows the relative components of gross domestic expenditure rounded to the nearest $5 billion.

Total size of the economy is $290 billion.

Four components increased GDP, with household spending at $170 billion, government $55 billion, investment $70 billion, and exports $80 billion. A fifth component, imports $80 billion, decreased GDP.

Video

See the Gross domestic product: September 2018 quarter video.

The Government Statistician authorises all statistics and data we publish.

For more information about these statistics:

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MIL-OSI Submissions: Provisional migration estimates by age-sex now available – Stats NZ

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Provisional migration estimates by age-sex now available – 19 December 2018

Provisional international migration estimates are now available by age group and sex, Stats NZ said today.

“This is the first time our customers are able to see the new provisional migration estimates by key demographics such as age and sex,” population insights senior manager Brooke Theyers said.

“Migration is usually concentrated in certain age groups and is sometimes different between males and females. So, these breakdowns of migration are important for customers to understand migrant flows into and out of New Zealand.”

“Accurate measures of migration by age group flow through into many other data uses, including official population estimates.”

The downloadable files below and the graphs in this release give age-sex estimates for migrant arrivals, migrant departures, and net migration (arrivals minus departures).

They are an indication of the migration statistics that will be available when our new outcomes-based approach is fully adopted in January 2019.

Half of migrants aged 20–34 years

The migration estimates in the downloadable file ‘Estimated annual migrant arrivals, migrant departures, and net migration, by age group and sex, 2014–18 – CSV’ and figure 1 show that both arrivals into New Zealand, and departures from New Zealand, are concentrated in the 20–34 age range. In the year ended October 2018, 46 percent of migrant arrivals and 49 percent of migrant departures were aged 20–34 years.

“It’s also notable that the uncertainty in these provisional annual estimates is relatively small,” Mrs Theyers said. “While the relative uncertainty is higher for recent monthly data, on an annual basis the uncertainty shrinks.”

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Migrant flows more accurately measured by outcomes data

We have been developing an outcomes-based approach to estimate migration into and out of New Zealand. Final estimates will be available 17 months after the reference month, but provisional estimates will be available after one month to maintain the timeliness of migration statistics (see Update on the development of provisional external migration statistics).

The outcomes-based approach is a way of classifying border crossings as short-term or long-term, based on whether travellers actually spend 12 months (or more) of the following 16 months in New Zealand. By comparison, the intentions-based approach, which we used previously, relied on the stated plans of people when they arrived in or left New Zealand.

The new methodology is completely independent of passenger cards. It provides a sustainable ongoing method of classifying travellers now that passengers are no longer required to complete departure cards as they leave New Zealand.

Previously released migration estimates show that arrivals and departures are typically higher in the outcomes-based measure than the traditional intentions-based measure (see Outcomes versus intentions: Measuring migration based on travel histories and Provisional migration estimates by citizenship now available). However, net migration (arrivals minus departures) using outcomes has been lower and higher than intentions at different times. In recent years, net migration using outcomes has been lower than intentions.

Net migration gains across all age groups

The latest annual data, for the year ended October 2018, indicates all age groups gained people from international migration. Nearly half the gains were at ages 25–39 years (see figure 2).

“Although the largest arrival and departure flows were at ages 20–34 years, the net difference between arrivals and departures was largest at ages 25–39 years,” Mrs Theyers said.

Females aged 25–29 years had a net migration gain during the year of about 5,300. This was the largest net gain of any five-year age group. However, over all ages, the net migration gain of males and females was roughly equal.

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New release schedule

A new release, called International travel, will replace statistics on short-term movements that were previously published in two different releases – International travel and migration (ITM) and International visitor arrivals to New Zealand (IVA).

Long-term movements will be published in the new International migration release. Both new releases will be published on the same day, up to 30 working days after each reference month. November data, previously published just before Christmas, will now be published in January, and December data in February (see Release calendar).

The new release schedule largely reflects the need to use integrated administrative data (ie Stats NZ’s Integrated Data Infrastructure) to provide place-of-residence within New Zealand of migrants and short-term resident travellers. This replaces information from the departure card. The timing is also affected by the new method to produce provisional migration estimates.

For more information about the changes to migration statistics see Migration Data Transformation Project, which includes mock-ups of how the Excel summary tables will look in the new International travel and International migration releases from January 2019. Feedback on these new tables is welcome: email info@stats.govt.nz.

Text alternative for figure 1
An age-sex pyramid or bar graph with discrete data points showing migrant arrival and migrant departure numbers by five-year age group, for males and females separately, for the year ended October 2018. Data for the year ended October 2018 is provisional. Each provisional data point has 95 percent uncertainty bounds to show the level of confidence in the estimate. Data is available in the downloadable file ‘Estimated annual migrant arrivals, migrant departures, and net migration, by age group and sex, 2014–18 – CSV’.

Text alternative for figure 2
An age-sex pyramid or bar graph with discrete data points showing net migration numbers by five-year age group, for males and females separately, for the year ended October 2018. Data for the year ended October 2018 is provisional. Each provisional data point has 95 percent uncertainty bounds to show the level of confidence in the estimate. Data is available in the downloadable file ‘Estimated annual migrant arrivals, migrant departures, and net migration, by age group and sex, 2014–18 – CSV’.

The Government Statistician authorises all statistics and data we publish.

For more information about these statistics:

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