First major NZ exercise conference in Christchurch for 15 years

Source: MakeLemonade.nz

Christchurch – The phenomenal growth of boutique fitness studios as well as specialist classes such as aqua and spin will be among the topics discussed at the FitEx-Lite conference in Christchurch next month.

The May 18 ExerciseNZ event has attracted interest from hundreds of people and will be hosting speakers from both around New Zealand and overseas.

ExerciseNZ chief executive Richard Beddie says another big issue to be talked about will be facia. This tissue which is important for stabilisation and mobility within the body, is so often ignored.

“Facia, or the connective tissue between the muscles, ligaments and tendons, is proving to play an important role in not only performance, but everyday movement and, in many cases, restrictions and injuries.

“We will also discuss why rest is so important for the body. Regular exercisers often use techniques and concepts borrowed from athletes yet they seldom use the rest athletes’ and recovery strategies.

“We will also look at solutions on how to support people with chronic health conditions – everything from cancer to Alzheimers. There are so many health conditions which benefit from exercise.

“Learning the what and how of exercising with a serious health condition is essential if we as an industry are going to help about a million Kiwis with a chronic long-term health issues,” Beddie says.

ExerciseNZ has been running major annual conferences in Auckland every for the last 15 years but Christchurch has one of the most active communities of exercise professionals in NZ, taking into account its size.

Beddie says he is excited to launch the first ever FitEx LITE in Christchurch which has been designed to offer world-class education opportunities for exercise professionals and movement practitioners.

For further information contact Make Lemonade NZ editor-in-chief Kip Brook on 0275 030188

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NZ among the worst countries for physical inactivity

Source: MakeLemonade.nz

Christchurch – New Zealand is rated 10th best in the world for gym membership but we have some of the worst physical inactivity levels globally, ExerciseNZ chief executive Richard Beddie says.

He has just returned from a World Health Organisation conference in Geneva where he led a session on global standards for exercise professionals.

“For a country like ours, we should be much more active. About 14 percent of the population have gym memberships which puts us right up there, but we also have some of the worst inactivity levels with 40 percent of New Zealanders inactive which just doesn’t meet the WHO levels for active societies. This makes us 13th worst globally for inactvity,” Beddie says.

“New Zealand is fast becoming a country of haves and have nots when it comes to physical activity.

“WHO believes anything more than 28 percent of the population not exercising is unacceptable – and in New Zealand it is even worse or a high level of inactivity for children.

“Globally the average rate of inactivity (defined as less than 150 minutes of physical activity a week) is 28 percent. New Zealand’s 40 percent inactivity rate is therefore very concerning, especially considering that the rate for childrens’ inactivity is even higher (as high as 90 percent in some age groups).

“My presentation was about how the exercise industry has developed global standards for exercise professionals, now adopted by 12 countries including the US, India, China, Canada, NZ, Australia, the UK.

“NZ was at the forefront of standards development for exercise professionals, being the third country in the world to develop a national registration system underpinned by qualifications mapped to government standards.

“The WHO meeting was very productive with lots of actionable steps, including the likely introduction of inclusive fitness which is a campaign driven by UNESCO. WHO are looking at including that initiative into their global physical activity plan.

“ExerciseNZ has already agreed to launch it in New Zealand. It’s all about making exercise accessible to everyone, regardless of ability or disability.”

Those with disabilities have barriers to taking part in some activities but this initiative is training staff, developing specific programmes where needed and supporting those with disabilities to take part in existing programmes and services offered by exercise providers.

Beddie says in the context of the UNESCO initiative, New Zealand had more than one million people who would fall into the disability category such sight loss, physical and mental disability and chronic health conditions.

He also attended the IHRSA conference in San Diego and he hosted the Australasian forum discussing how to support non-exercising groups with exercise, instructor standards, and career pathways for people entering the exercise industry.

“The big issue is how to support those that don’t traditionally take part in exercise or haven’t done so in many years.

“Finally but most importantly, our heartfelt thoughts go out to the families, friends and whanau of those affected by last week’s tragedy in Christchurch.

“As part of the Christchurch community, we stand united to say terrorism has no place in our country. Our fitness community in particular prides itself on being inclusive and where there is no room for racial or religious discrimination, and all are welcome.”

For further information contact Richard Beddie on 027 5205744 or Make Lemonade editor-in-chief Kip Brook on 0275 030188.

Photo: Richard Beddie with WHO delegates in Geneva

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Beddie invited by the WHO to help global exercise concerns

Source: MakeLemonade.nz

Christchurch – Richard Beddie, one of New Zealand leading’s exercise experts, is one of 20 specialists from all over the world to be invited to talk to the World Health Organisation (WHO) in Geneva on February 25 and 26.

Beddie, who is recognised in the fitness industry as a global expert in exercise and physical activity, will be speaking at the WHO event which is seeking to get people more active for a healthier world.
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He says the conference will focus on the private sector, NGOs and governments so they can cooperate to increase physical activity rates globally.

Beddie, the chief executive of ExerciseNZ, has the knowledge and experience in getting more people active.

“The WHO event could improve the quality of lives of Kiwis, and if implemented, will reduce the health burden of inactivity on the taxpayer and government and it will explore ways of collaboration between Government, NGOs, the exercise industry and employers to get more Kiwis to be more active,” he says.

Beddie has a background in governance of global bodies including being chairman of the International Confederation of Register for Exercise Professionals (ICREPs) for four years and nine years with Skills Active Aotearoa, New Zealand’s standard setter for education and training in sport fitness and recreation.

He set up the world’s first collaborative network for registered exercise professionals globally and has worked with other countries to facilitate portability for New Zealand-trained exercise professionals to travel and work overseas.

“I am privileged to have been Involved with education and quality standards for the exercise industry in New Zealand for the last 20 years, including setting up NZ’s first national registration body for exercise professionals in 2003.

“I have also helped support district councils run large sport and reaction programmes to involve more people, while being financially sustainable.

“On the global stage, there is insufficient physical activity which is one of the leading risk factors for death worldwide.

“Globally, one in four adults is not active enough. More than 80 percent of the world’s adolescent population is insufficiently physically active.”

WHO defines physical activity as any bodily movement produced by skeletal muscles that requires energy expenditure – including activities undertaken while working, playing, carrying out household chores, travelling, and engaging in recreational pursuits.

WHO recommends that children and adolescents aged five to 17 years should do at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous-intensity physical activity daily. Physical activity of amounts greater than 60 minutes daily will provide additional health benefits.

“Adults aged 18 to 64 years should do at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity throughout the week, or at least 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity physical activity every week. But the key is start somewhere, once a week for 30 minutes is better than no exercise,” Beddie says.

For further information contact Make Lemonade NZ editor-in-chief Kip Brook on 0275 030188

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