MIL-OSI UK: Tenant Fees Bill: Lords third reading

Source: British Parliament News

14 January 2019
The Tenant Fees Bill has its third reading, a chance to ‘tidy up’ the bill and make changes, in the Lords on Tuesday 15 January.

Members are expected to discuss two amendments relating to interest payments owed by landlords or letting agents to enforcement authorities.
Lords report stage: Tuesday 11 December
Members discussed the acceptance of multiple holding deposits for the same property, the approval and designation of client money protection schemes and the requirement to belong to such a scheme.
Lords committee stage day two: Tuesday 20 November
Members discussed the early termination of tenancies and payments in respect of identity and immigration status checks.
Report stage, a further chance to examine the bill and make changes, is scheduled for 5 December.
Lords committee stage day one: Monday 5 November
The first day of committee stage of this bill took place in Grand Committee, a room outside the Lords chamber. In Grand Committee, any member can take part and decisions on amendments can be made, but no votes can take place.
Members discussed a range of subjects, including:
the government’s duty to provide tenants with guidance on the effects of this bill
the reimbursement of costs incurred by enforcement agencies in the exercise of their duties
the requirement of tenants to make payments to cover a landlord or agent’s loss due to a breach of the tenancy contract
Lords second reading: Wednesday 10 October
Members discussed unfair letting fees, compensation payments to tenants and home share schemes.
Lord Bourne of Aberystwyth (Conservative), parliamentary under-secretary in the Department for Housing, Communities and Local Government, responded on behalf of the government.
Tenant Fees Bill summary
This bill will aim to:
make renting fairer and more affordable for tenants by reducing the costs at the outset of a tenancy
improve transparency and competition in the private rental market
ban letting fees paid by tenants in England
improve fairness, competition and affordability in the lettings sector
Further information
Image: iStockphoto

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MIL-OSI UK: Divorce (Financial Provision) Bill: Lords third reading

Source: British Parliament News

20 December 2018
The Divorce (Financial Provisions) Bill had its third reading, a chance to ‘tidy up’ the bill and make changes, in the Lords on Wednesday 19 December.
This is a private member’s bill. A private member’s bill is a type of public bill (that affects the public). Private members’ bills must go through the same set of procedures as other public bills.

This bill aims to amend the Matrimonial Causes Act 1973 in connection with financial settlements following divorce.
No changes were made at third reading.
Following completion of third reading, the bill now goes to the House of Commons for its consideration.
Lords committee stage: Friday 23 November
As no changes were suggested to the bill, a motion was agreed to that both committee and report stages be dispensed with and that the bill progress directly to third reading. This procedure is known as ‘order of commitment discharged’.
Lords second reading: Friday 11 May
The Divorce (Financial Provisions) Bill had its second reading, the key debate on the draft law’s purpose and principles, on 11 May 2018.
Further information
Image: House of Lords 2018 / Photography by Roger Harris

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MIL-OSI UK: Lords debates Islamophobia in the UK

Source: British Parliament News

19 December 2018
Members of the Lords, including the chair of the National Commission on Muslim Women and the former deputy chair of the Commission for Racial Equality, will debate the impact of Islamophobia in the United Kingdom, in the House of Lords on Thursday 20 December.

This is a balloted debate. They normally take place on a Thursday in the chamber. During debates, members are able to put their experience to good use, discussing current issues and drawing the government’s attention to concerns.
The debate was proposed by Lord Sheikh (Conservative), vice chair of the All Party Parliamentary Group on Race and Community.
Members expected to take part include:
Baroness Afshar (Crossbench), chair of the Communication Committee at the British Muslim Research Centre
Baroness Burt of Solihull (Liberal Democrat), former shadow Secretary of State for Equalities
Lord Parekh (Labour), former deputy chair of the Commission for Racial Equality
Baroness Uddin (Non-affiliated), chair of the National Commission on Muslim Women
Baroness Warsi (Conservative), treasurer of the All Party Parliamentary Group on British Muslims
Lord Bourne of Aberystwyth (Conservative), parliamentary under-secretary in the Department for Housing, Communities and Local Government, will respond on behalf of the government.
Further information
Image: iStockphoto

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MIL-OSI UK: Lords debates Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse

Source: British Parliament News

19 December 2018
Members of the Lords, including the shadow attorney general and a former Deputy Assistant Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Service, will debate the remit of, and arrangements for the handling of evidence by, the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse, in the House of Lords on Thursday 20 December.

This is a balloted debate. They normally take place on a Thursday in the chamber. During debates, members are able to put their experience to good use, discussing current issues and drawing the government’s attention to concerns.
The debate was proposed by Lord Campbell-Savours (Labour), former member of the parliamentary Joint Committee on the Draft Charities Bill 2004-05.
Members expected to take part include:
Baroness Chakrabarti (Labour), shadow attorney general and council member of law reform and human rights organisation JUSTICE
Lord Hunt of Wirral (Conservative), chair of the All Party Parliamentary Group on Legal and Constitutional Affairs 
Lord Paddick (Liberal Democrat), former Deputy Assistant Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Service
Baroness Barran (Conservative), government whip, will respond on behalf of the government.
Further information
Image: iStockphoto

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MIL-OSI UK: Lords debates probate fees regulations

Source: British Parliament News

17 December 2018
Members of the Lords will discuss draft regulations on the fee structure for applications for a grant of probate, in the House of Lords on Tuesday 18 December.

Draft Non-Contentious Probate (Fees) Order 2018
This statutory instrument introduces a new regime of fees for applications for a grant of probate, with a banded structure based on the value of the estate. It increases the estate threshold below which no fee for an application for a grant of probate is payable from £5,000 to £50,000.
It also removes applications for a grant of probate from the generally applicable remissions scheme for courts and tribunal fees (‘Help with Fees’), but retains the Lord Chancellors’ power to remit or reduce a fee in exceptional circumstances. Provision is also made for refunds and remissions in specified circumstances.
Lord Marks of Henley-on-Thames (Liberal Democrat) has proposed an amendment to the motion to approve the Order which is ‘that this House declines to approve the draft Order, because it would be an abuse of the fee-levying power, since the proposed increased fees substantially exceed the cost involved in making grants of probate and would amount to a tax, which should only be introduced, if at all, by primary legislation.”
If this amendment is agreed by the House the draft Order will be stopped and will not pass into law.
 Lord Beecham (Labour) has also proposed a motion to regret against the Order, on the grounds that it will introduce a revised non-contentious probate fee structure considered by the Secondary Legislation Scrutiny Committee to be “so far above the actual cost of the service [it] arguably amounts to a stealth tax and, therefore, a misuse of the fee-levying power” under section 180 of the Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014; and that this Order represents a significant move away from the principle that fees for a public service should recover the cost of providing it and no more.”
If agreed, this motion will not stop the Order, but will provid an opportunity for the House to put on record its regret that the increase in fees is far greater than the actual cost of the service.
How do these draft instruments become law?
These regulations are presented as a Statutory Instrument (SI). An Act will often contain a broad framework and statutory instruments are used to provide the necessary detail that would be too complex to include in the Act itself. They are also easier to change than an Act – for example to upgrade the rate of payment each year or amend the necessary forms in the light of experience.
This instrument is subject to the affirmative procedure, that means they it must be debated in both Houses before it can be made law. A vote can be taken on them if the House wishes but is not essential.
 Further information
Image: House of Lords 2018 / Photography by Roger Harris

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MIL-OSI UK: Lords debates challenges facing young people

Source: British Parliament News

12 December 2018
Members of the Lords, including a former lecturer in youth and community work at Sunderland Polytechnic and a former health education advisor for the Inner London Education Authority, will debate the challenges facing young people, in the House of Lords on Thursday 13 December.

This is a general debate. They normally take place on a Thursday in the chamber. During debates, members are able to put their experience to good use, discussing current issues and drawing the government’s attention to concerns.
The debate was proposed by Baroness Armstrong of Hill Top (Labour), former lecturer in youth and community work at Sunderland Polytechnic.
Members expected to take part include:
Earl of Listowel (Crossbench), board member and trustee of the Child and Family Practice Charitable Foundation
Baroness Massey of Darwen (Labour), former health education advisor for the Inner London Education Authority
Lord Norton of Louth (Conservative), ambassador for the Albert Kennedy Trust support organisation for homeless LGBT+ young people
Lord Storey (Liberal Democrat), former primary school head teacher and co-chair of the Liberal Democrat PPC on Education, Families and Young People
Lord Agnew of Oulton (Conservative), parliamentary under-secretary in the Department for Education, will respond on behalf of the government.
Further information
Image: iStockphoto

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MIL-OSI UK: Lords examines Tenant Fees Bill

Source: British Parliament News

10 December 2018
The Tenant Fees Bill has its report stage, a further chance to examine the bill and make changes, in the Lords on Tuesday 11 December.

Members are expected to discuss the transfer of deposits to a second landlord or agent, the approval and designation of  client money protection schemes and the requirement to belong to such a scheme.
Lords committee stage day two: Tuesday 20 November
Members discussed the early termination of tenancies and payments in respect of identity and immigration status checks.
Report stage, a further chance to examine the bill and make changes, is scheduled for 5 December.
Lords committee stage day one: Monday 5 November
The first day of committee stage of this bill took place in Grand Committee, a room outside the Lords chamber. In Grand Committee, any member can take part and decisions on amendments can be made, but no votes can take place.
Members discussed a range of subjects, including:
the government’s duty to provide tenants with guidance on the effects of this bill
the reimbursement of costs incurred by enforcement agencies in the exercise of their duties
the requirement of tenants to make payments to cover a landlord or agent’s loss due to a breach of the tenancy contract
Lords second reading: Wednesday 10 October
Members discussed unfair letting fees, compensation payments to tenants and home share schemes.
Lord Bourne of Aberystwyth (Conservative), parliamentary under-secretary in the Department for Housing, Communities and Local Government, responded on behalf of the government.
Tenant Fees Bill summary
This bill will aim to:
make renting fairer and more affordable for tenants by reducing the costs at the outset of a tenancy
improve transparency and competition in the private rental market
ban letting fees paid by tenants in England
improve fairness, competition and affordability in the lettings sector
Further information
Image: iStockphoto

MIL-OSI UK News