New partnership renews push for zero pre-schooler drownings by 2020

Source: New Zealand Plunket Society

A new partnership between YMCA Auckland, Plunket and Auckland Council is increasing the push for zero drownings in the under-five age group across Auckland.

The partnership, which takes effect from Monday 29th April 2019, is being driven by YMCA Auckland and will see the not-for-profit’s Swim School programme run out of eight Auckland pools rather than the current four.

In 2017, seven children under the age of five drowned in New Zealand, that’s two more than in 2016. Of those seven fatalities, five occurred in home pools. In that same year, a further 26 children were hospitalised as a result of near fatal drowning incidents.

“By adding four Auckland Council run pools to the list, we’ll have all of Auckland covered. By increasing our reach, we give more Auckland pre-schoolers access to potentially life-saving knowledge and education,” says Karla McCaughan, YMCA Auckland Swim School Quality Services Manager.

Plunket’s Northern Regional Operations Manager Sam Ferreira says the new partnership is a fantastic opportunity to work towards zero drownings for Auckland pre-schoolers.

“Plunket works every day to build the confidence and knowledge of families and whānau, and we’re delighted to be able to provide half price swimming lessons to our Auckland families and support their confidence around water safety.”

Since 2017, YMCA Auckland and Plunket have worked together to deliver water safety sessions to 17,500 pre-schoolers via the four Auckland Council pools run by YMCA Auckland: Lagoon Pool and Leisure Centre, Onehunga War Memorial Pool, Cameron Pool and Leisure Centre, and Glen Innes Pool and Leisure Centre.

The four Auckland Council owned and operated pools being added to the list are: Tepid Baths, West Wave Pool and Leisure Centre, Albany Stadium Pool, and Manurewa Pool and Leisure Centre.

Auckland pre-schoolers aged three months to five years will have access to half price swimming and water safety lessons at all eight sites.

Councillor Penny Hulse, Chair of the Council’s Environment and Community Committee, says working with organisations like Plunket and YMCA is a great example of Auckland Council partnering with the non-profit sector to support community initiatives.

“Being safe around water – whether it’s a pool, at the beach or river – is essential to living an active life in Auckland. This partnership will equip our young people with the knowledge and skills to be safe and survive in and around water.”

Auckland Council’s Head of Active Recreation Rob McGee says jumping on board the initiative was a no-brainer.

“This partnership with YMCA and Plunket gives us a great opportunity to reach more young Aucklanders and their families to ensure the whole whānau knows how to swim and are educated on basic water safety skills.”

Another five council pools will be brought into the fold over the next three years.

“I’ll be training and educating all Auckland Council pool staff to ensure our water safety product is consistent across all eight sites. If a family goes to Cameron Pool or any other site they’ll get the same level of service and education. Consistency is key,” says McCaughan.

“Together we are helping shape a more water-safety aware Auckland.”

0 Comments Posted by Plunket on 8 April 2019

MIL OSI

Proposal to list medical devices supplied by Becton Dickinson Limited

Source: Pharmac

What we’re proposing

PHARMAC is seeking feedback on a proposal to list a range of needles and syringes in Part III of Section H of the Pharmaceutical Schedule from 1 June 2019, through a non-exclusive provisional agreement with Becton Dickinson Limited (“BD”).

Consultation closes at 4pm on Wednesday, 1 May 2019 and feedback can be emailed to chloe.dimock@pharmac.govt.nz.

What would the effect be?

From 1 June 2019, BD’s range of needles and syringes products would be listed under the proposed national agreement for all DHBs to purchase under, subject to consultation and approval by PHARMAC’s Board or delegate (“Agreement”).

This Agreement would not be for sole supply, with DHBs continuing to be able to purchase other suppliers’ brands of needles and syringes. The Agreement includes currently used products and products that are new to DHBs and their funded services and would provide a greater range of products for clinical staff to choose from.

The Agreement would supersede any existing DHB contracts with BD for the devices included in the Agreement. Any medical device listed in the Agreement and purchased by a DHB would be at the price, terms and conditions stated in the Agreement, effective from the date of listing on the Pharmaceutical Schedule.

As part of the Agreement, BD would provide educational services that would be tailored to the individual needs of the DHB, in formats and at times as required by the DHB.

Pricing for the devices in the Agreement, subject to any prior termination of the Agreement, would not be increased without prior consultation and approval by PHARMAC.

Who we think will be interested


About the medical devices

Needles and syringes

Needles and syringes are medical devices predominantly used to inject fluids (such as medicines) into or withdraw fluids from the body (such as blood). Syringes are also used for a variety of other purposes such as for flushing, irrigating and are also used with medical gases and air. These medical devices are used across a wide range of clinical settings.

Included in this proposal are conventional hypodermic needles, syringes, needles and syringes with safety feature, insulin syringes, lancets and a number of specialised needles and syringes used in anaesthesia procedures.


Why we’re proposing this

In 2017 PHARMAC issued a Request for Proposals (“RFP”) for needles and syringes.

The RFP was for non-exclusive national agreements for listing in the Pharmaceutical Schedule.

PHARMAC has been working with suppliers to seek provisional agreements and this proposal is the latest to arise from this process. This is the final proposal eventuating from the 2017 Needles and Syringes RFP that we are consulting on.

Details about our proposal

PHARMAC has entered into a provisional Agreement with BD for a range of needles and syringes. Pricing has been made available to appropriate DHB personnel.

The proposal would result in Pharmaceutical Schedule listings for 177 needle and syringe products.

Brand

  • BD
  • BD AutoShield Duo
  • BD Eclipse
  • BD Epilor
  • BD Integra      
  • BD Micro-Fine+
  • BD Microtainer
  • BD SafetyGlide
  • BD Ultra-Fine
  • BD Yale

To provide feedback

Send us an email: chloe.dimock@pharmac.govt.nz by 4 pm on Wednesday 1 May 2019.

All feedback received before the closing date will be considered by PHARMAC’s Board (or its delegate) prior to making a decision on this proposal.

Feedback we receive is subject to the Official Information Act 1982 (OIA) and we will consider any request to have information withheld in accordance with our obligations under the OIA. Anyone providing feedback, whether on their own account or on behalf of an organisation, and whether in a personal or professional capacity, should be aware that the content of their feedback and their identity may need to be disclosed in response to an OIA request.

We are not able to treat any part of your feedback as confidential unless you specifically request that we do, and then only to the extent permissible under the OIA and other relevant laws and requirements. If you would like us to withhold any commercially sensitive, confidential proprietary, or personal information included in your submission, please clearly state this in your submission and identify the relevant sections of your submission that you would like it withheld. PHARMAC will give due consideration to any such request.

Last updated: 8 April 2019

MIL OSI

More questions than answers

Source: Association of Salaried Medical Specialists

The Mental Health and Addiction inquiry report has laudable aims but lacks detail about implementation and side-lines those who work in the sector, says Lyndon Keene, Director of Policy and Research at the Association of Salaried Medical Specialists (ASMS)

Published in ASMS magazine The Specialist on page 17-18, Mr Keene’s analysis of the report can be read here: https://www.asms.org.nz/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/The-Specialist-Issue-118.pdf

Mr Keene takes issue with the inquiry panel’s decision to be (in the panel’s words) “guided by the needs of people and communities rather than the preferences of the various groups accustomed to the way the system is structured and services are delivered at present”.

Excluding workforce views might account, in part, for a lack of substance about how to deliver the recommendations. Mr Keene says notwithstanding the exclusion of workforce views, the conclusions are reasonable and will find consensus. An emphasis on wellbeing and community, prevention, expanded access to services, and more treatment options are laudable, if rather familiar, aims. The lack of specifics about how to achieve the desired outcomes allows the Government much wriggle-room.

The practicalities of what will change, and how, are no closer to being answered than before the panel was convened, Mr Keene writes.

While the report talks about a “workforce crisis” there is little recognition of issues in the psychiatrist workforce. Indeed, the report incorrectly states there was “a large jump in the number of registered psychiatrists in 2018”.

Trainee numbers have risen in recent years but are lower than in the early 2000s. There is a heavy reliance on international medical graduates (60% of the workforce).

In 2018 there were 492 full-time equivalent psychiatrists employed by DHBs, compared with 482 in 2017.  Caution is needed interpreting the figures because it could reflect an increase in registrations of doctors, including non-specialist medical officers, who were already practising.

District health board workforce figures do not show a large jump in full-time-equivalent psychiatrists.

The report calls for psychiatrists to provide more support for community-based workers. ASMS has long advocated for integrated services and patient-centred care. This approach requires a well-resourced specialist workforce.

Ultimately, it’s the Government – whose official response to the report is expected soon – which determines if the recommendations are transformed into actions.

“The extent to which the Government supports a well-resourced [Mental Health] Commission with teeth will be an early test of its commitment to addressing our mental health crisis,” Mr Keene writes.

MIL OSI

Annual Update of Key Results 2017/18: New Zealand Health Survey

Source: New Zealand Ministry of Health

The Annual Data Explorer provides a snapshot of the health of New Zealanders through the publication of key indicators on health behaviours, health status and access to health care for both adults and children.

The Annual Data Explorer shows 2017/18 results from the continuous New Zealand Health Survey, with comparisons to earlier surveys. Results are available by gender, age group, ethnic group and neighbourhood deprivation.

If you have any queries please email hdi@moh.govt.nz

Overview of key findings

Health behaviours and risk factors

Current smoking

  • About 581,000 adults (15%) were current smokers, down from 20% in 2006/07.
  • 33% of Māori adults were current smokers, down from 42% in 2006/07.
  • 23% of Pacific adults were current smokers (not a significant change from previous years – 27% in 2006/07).
  • The most substantial reduction in the current smoking rate since 2006/07 was for those aged 15-17 years, with 3.6% smoking in 2017/18, compared with 16% in 2006/07.
  • Adults living in the most socio-economically deprived areas were three times as likely to be current smokers as people living in the least deprived areas, after adjusting for age, gender and ethnic differences.

Hazardous drinking

  • One in five adults (20%) drank alcohol in a way that could harm themselves or others (hazardous drinking).
  • Hazardous drinking rates were higher in men (27%) than women (13%).
  • Despite fewer people in the most deprived areas (compared to those in the least deprived areas) having drunk alcohol in the past year, adults in the most deprived areas were 1.3 times as likely to be hazardous drinkers as adults in the least deprived areas, after adjusting for age, gender and ethnic differences.

Obesity

  • About 101,000 children aged 2–14 years (12.4%) were obese. The child obesity rate has not changed significantly since 2011/12 (when it was 10.7%), although it has increased since 2006/07 (8.4%).
  • 1.26 million adults (32%) were obese, up from 27% in 2006/07.
  • Children living in the most socio-economically deprived areas were 2.1 times as likely to be obese as children living in the least deprived areas, after adjusting for age, gender and ethnic differences.

Go to Improving the health of New Zealanders find out what’s being done to reduce smoking, hazardous drinking and obesity rates.

Health status

Self-rated health

  • 88% of adults reported their health to be ‘good, very good or excellent, down from 90% in 2006/07.
  • 98% of parents rated their child’s health as ‘good, very good or excellent’. This result has not changed significantly since 2006/07.

Psychological distress

  • 8.6% of adults reported experiencing psychological distress in the past four weeks, up from 7.6% in 2016/17 and from 6.6% in 2006/07.
  • Adults living in the most socioeconomically deprived areas were 2.5 times as likely to experience psychological distress as adults living in the least deprived areas, after adjusting for age, gender and ethnicity.

Go to Improving the health of New Zealanders to find out what’s being done to improve mental health.

Access to health care

Unmet need for GPs due to cost

  • 15% of adults reported not visiting a GP due to cost in the past year, which is not significantly different from 2011/12.
  • Only 2.0% of children did not visit a GP due to cost in the past year, down from 4.7% in 2011/12.
  • The Ministry of Health provides additional funding to encourage free GP consultations for children under 13 years of age (the Zero Fees for Under-6s initiative started in January 2008 and was extended to Zero Fees for Under-13s in July 2015). Rates of unmet need for GP services due to cost were low for children aged 6–12 years (1.6%), a decrease from 2015/16 (5.8%).

Unfilled prescription due to cost

  • About 28,000 children (3.0%) had a prescription that was not collected due to cost in the past year, down from 6.6% in 2011/12.
  • About 257,000 adults (6.6%) reported not collecting a prescription due to cost in the past year.
  • Māori and Pacific adults and children were more than twice as likely to not have collected a prescription due to cost as non-Pacific and non-Māori adults and children respectively, after adjusting for age and gender differences.

Go to Improving the health of New Zealanders to find out what’s being done to improve access to primary health care.

Oral health

  • 80% of adults reported their oral health to be ‘good, very good or excellent’.
  • 94% of parents rated their child’s oral health as ‘good, very good or excellent’.
  • Most children (83%) visited a dental health care worker in the past year, up from 76% in 2006/07.
  • Nearly half of adults (47%) with natural teeth visited a dental health care worker in the past year, down from 52% in 2006/07.

 Go to Improving the health of New Zealanders to find out what’s being done to improve oral health.

Reports from previous years

Data from previous years has been incorporated into the latest version of the data explorer. To access the reports from previous years, see our Library Catalogue.

MIL OSI

One in 10 New Zealanders uncomfortable asking doctors whether a test or treatment is necessary

Source: Health Quality and Safety Commission

One in 10 Kiwis don’t feel comfortable asking their doctor about whether a treatment or test is necessary, a survey by Consumer NZ and the Council of Medical Colleges has found.

The annual survey was carried out as part of the organisations’ Choosing Wisely campaign, which encourages people to ask their health professional four questions when a test or treatment is suggested:

  1. Do I really need this test, treatment or procedure?
  2. What are the risks?
  3. Are there simpler, safer options?
  4. What happens if I don’t do anything?

Consumer NZ chief executive Sue Chetwin said people should feel able to question health care treatment options.

‘Understanding why your doctor is considering a test – and weighing up the benefits and risks – is every patient’s right.

‘Ask what is likely to happen if you do – or don’t – have a test or procedure. Are there potential side effects? What are the chances of getting results that aren’t accurate? Could that lead to more testing or another procedure?

‘Just by having these discussions you and your doctor will be clearer on what is the best thing to do for your health and wellbeing.’

The survey also found 21 percent of consumers felt their doctor had recommended a test or treatment that wasn’t necessary. Of those, 24 percent said they went ahead and had it anyway. Eighteen percent ignored the doctor’s recommendation.

Thirty-five percent of consumers felt some tests or treatments did not benefit the patient.

While most felt their doctor always (40 percent) or often (30 percent) involved them in decisions about their care, one in five thought this only happened sometimes.

Choosing Wisely medical director Dr Derek Sherwood said there is mounting evidence that more tests and procedures don’t always equal better care.

‘While modern medicine has given us more ways than ever to diagnose and treat illness, sometimes, the best option may be to do nothing.

‘Tests, treatments and procedures have side effects and some may even cause harm. For example, CT scans and x-rays expose you to radiation; overuse of antibiotics leads to them becoming less effective; a false positive test may lead to painful and stressful further investigation.’

As well as encouraging patients to ask their doctor about tests and treatments, the Choosing Wisely campaign has comprehensive information for health professionals about which tests, treatments and procedures to question.

Choosing Wisely sponsors are the Council of Medical Colleges, Southern Cross Health Society, Pacific Radiology and PHARMAC. Consumer NZ and the Health Quality & Safety Commission are Choosing Wisely partners, and there is wide health sector support for the campaign.

See the Choosing Wisely website for more information or download a copy of the survey results (156KB, PDF).

Last updated 05/04/2019

MIL OSI

Proposal to list endomechanical and electrosurgical medical devices

Source: Pharmac

What we’re proposing

PHARMAC is seeking feedback on a proposal to list a range of Endomechanical and Electrosurgical Medical Devices on Section H Part III of the Pharmaceutical Schedule from 1 June 2019 through a listing agreement with Ortho Medics Limited (“Ortho Medics”).

Consultation closes at 5pm on Friday, 26 April 2019 and feedback can be emailed to maree.hodgson@pharmac.govt.nz

What would the effect be?

From 1 June 2019, Ortho Medics’ range of Endomechanical and Electrosurgical Products would be listed under the proposed national agreement for all DHBs to purchase under, subject to consultation and approval by PHARMAC’s Board or delegate (“Agreement”).

The Agreement would not be for sole supply, with DHBs continuing to be able to purchase other suppliers’ brands of Endomechanical and Electrosurgical products.

The Agreement would supersede any existing DHB contracts with Ortho Medics for the Endomechanical and Electrosurgical products listed in the Agreement. Any Endomechanical and Electrosurgical products listed in the Agreement and purchased by a DHB would be at the price, terms and conditions stated in the Agreement, effective from the date of listing on the Pharmaceutical Schedule.

As part of the Agreement Ortho Medics would provide training and education that would be tailored to meet the needs of individual DHB Hospitals.

About Endomechanical and Electrosurgical Medical Devices

Endomechanical and electrosurgical medical devices are used in a vast range of surgical specialties and procedures. Many have been specifically designed to be used for minimally invasive surgical techniques whilst others are only used in open surgery procedures. Some require power sources or other equipment to perform their function.

The endomechanical and electrosurgical medical devices category encompasses the product ranges of endomechanical instruments, electrosurgical instruments, energy platforms and their associated consumable products. This covers both disposable and re-usable options, as well as the portable power sources or other equipment that specific instruments may require to be functional.

Why we’re proposing this

In 2018, PHARMAC released a Request for Proposals for endomechanical instruments, electrosurgical instruments, energy platforms and consumable products (“Endomechanical and Electrosurgical Products”). We have been working with suppliers in order to seek provisional agreements, and this is the latest agreement to be negotiated with a proposed listing date of 1 June.

We expect to consult on further provisional agreements, with other suppliers, over the next few months.

Last updated: 5 April 2019

MIL OSI

Pukeko Pictures’ Kiddets Partners with Plunket

Source: New Zealand Plunket Society

Pukeko Pictures’ preschool brand, Kiddets has partnered with Plunket, New Zealand’s largest provider of free development, health and wellbeing support services for children under five.

The partnership will see Kiddets and Plunket branded collateral available to Plunket’s 530 locations across New Zealand, helping to make children’s Well Child checks even more enjoyable.

“We are really excited to be working with Pukeko Pictures again and the Kiddets is a great platform to get some important health messages out to children and whānau,” said Plunket’s Head of Partnerships and Brand, Carolyn Mettrick.

A specially created Kiddets animation will also be available in some Plunket locations, as well as via the Kiddets and Plunket websites.

“We are thrilled to be once again partnering with Plunket, who work closely with so many families across New Zealand.  We can’t wait to see Patches, Dapper, Bounce, Stripes and Luna land in Plunket clinics and help make these vital checks an even more relaxed experience for little ones,” said Pukeko Pictures’ Chief Creative Officer, Executive Producer and Company Director, Martin Baynton.

“Children learn together through play and the Kiddets exemplify this with each episode focusing on a special interest such as leadership, health and safety, mechanics, science and the arts,” said Ms Mettrick.

Posters, decals and other material will be on display in Plunket centres from April, along with special online promotions and giveaways.

A second season of 52 episodes of Pukeko Pictures’ and Hengxin Shambala Kids’ Kiddets was recently greenlit for production.  It was also confirmed that Hengxin Shambala Kids has come on board as the master toy partner for the Chinese market where a licensing program is beginning to roll-out, including Kiddetsland theme parks and a stage show.

Kiddets, a sister series to Pukeko Pictures’ The WotWots, is co-produced by Pukeko Pictures and Hengxin Shambala Kids and is the first official children’s television co-production between New Zealand and China.  It airs on ABC KIDS in Australia, TVNZ’s TV2, HEI HEI and On Demand services in New Zealand and CCTV Children’s Channel in China, where it is also available on VOD-platform iQiyi.  The series is distributed internationally by CAKE.    

Aimed at new and existing fans of The WotWots, Kiddets offers a broader audience appeal including older preschool children with each episode demonstrating the positive values of teamwork and the building blocks of true and enduring friendship.  Kiddets has been created by The WotWots’ Creator, Martin Baynton and will be Executive Produced by Richard Taylor and Clive Spink.  CAKE handles worldwide distribution rights excluding Australia, New Zealand and Greater China to Kiddets and also extends to North American and European rights (for series 2) of the The WotWots.

Kiddets expands upon The WotWots franchise with brand new adventures and sees the introduction of five new WotWot characters, Patches, Dapper, Bounce, Stripes and Luna – young space cadets in training at a play school space academy on planet WotWot.  Under the watchful eye of SpottyWot and DottyWot who are based on planet Earth, Patches, Dapper, Bounce, Stripes and Luna learn all the skills they need to embark on a mission to a new world.

0 Comments Posted by Plunket on 5 April 2019

MIL OSI

It’s Advance Care Planning Day – start your plan today! Ko te Rā Whakarite Mahere Manaaki tēnei – tīmatahia tō mahere i tēnei rā!

Source: Health Quality and Safety Commission

It’s Advance Care Planning Day – start your plan today! Ko te Rā Whakarite Mahere Manaaki tēnei – tīmatahia tō mahere i tēnei rā!

5 Apr 2019 | Advance Care Planning

Today is Advance Care Planning Day and Kiwis are being encouraged to start planning for their future health and end-of-life care.

Advance care planning addresses important questions such as where you would want to be cared for if you could no longer care for yourself, what type of care you would like towards the end of your life and specific worries you might have about your wellbeing, being ill or dying.

You can kōrero with your whānau about your wishes for future health care using the advance care planning guide available at www.myacp.org.nz.

‘Advance Care Planning Day is an opportunity to start your plan today. It’s a timely reminder to talk to your loved ones and health care team about future treatment and care preferences,’ says Ria Earp, chair of the Health Quality and Safety Commission’s Te Rōpū Māori (Māori advisory group).

‘You don’t have to complete your plan all in one go, the important thing is to make a start. Having an advance care plan makes your values and beliefs clearer for your doctors and whānau. It is a gift to your whānau to guide them in the future.’

Wellingtonian Cheryl Cameron has lived with Parkinson’s for more than 11 years and came to the idea of advance care planning when she had an emergency visit to the hospital.

‘It made me think about at what point I would want to stop medical intervention. So, I’ve written down my wishes, and my husband Gary and I have shared it with our children, so that they all know my thoughts if they’re confronted with hard decisions.’

She says her family is very accepting of her decisions and reassured that she’s thought about the care she does and doesn’t want if she is ever unable to speak for herself.

A copy of her advance care plan is also lodged with her GP.

‘It’s very freeing knowing that it’s done. And, of course, it’s easily updated any time.’

Kuia Keri Kaa of Ngāti Porou is receiving palliative care and has come to realise how important it is for her to be cared for by her community within a Māori context and speaking te reo Māori.

‘Since I got sick, I started fretting for home. I didn’t think being cared for by home people was important, but it is.’

Keri says we all need to prepare for our final days.

‘When people are dying, a lot of them are frightened, as I am, because they don’t know where they’re going. But everybody has to go sometime. You’ve got to make sure your canoe is ready and that you’ve got your paddle on board, because you’ve got to have an ending to the story.’

Keri and Cheryl are part of the six New Zealanders who feature in Kia kōrero | Let’s talk, a campaign that encourages people to plan for their future health care, with a focus on what matters to them.

The advance care planning programme is led by the Health Quality & Safety Commission and supported by district health boards.

Start your plan today at www.myacp.org.nz.

Last updated 05/04/2019

MIL OSI

Progress on Gambling Harm Reduction 2010 to 2017: Outcomes report – New Zealand Strategy to Prevent and Minimise Gambling Harm

Source: New Zealand Ministry of Health

Summary

Overall, the outcomes presented in this report show progress has been made in reducing gambling harm and inequalities in New Zealand. However, since approximately 2012 the downward movement in harm levels has plateaued. A range of research-based explanations for these outcomes has been identified and presented. Research has shown that the plateauing in harm reduction is not unique to New Zealand.

Progress has also been made across all of the 11 objectives set out in the Ministry’s integrated Strategy in a number of the areas, although challenges to further progress have been identified.

These results imply that the current harm reduction activities should be reviewed and reinvigorated if the aim is to further reduce levels of gambling harm and inequities.

The Outcomes Report identifies a number of areas for including:

  • the sector working together as a whole:
  • revitalizing and refocusing service delivery
  • improving host responsibility practices aimed at identifying risky gambling behaviour and encouraging those at risk to seek help
  • enabling more effective and efficient voluntary multi-venue exclusion practice
  • relocating non-casino gambling machines (ie, ‘pokies’) away from the most socioeconomically deprived areas
  • improving the flow of the distribution of the proceeds of gambling to the community groups in the areas in greatest need of support.

What happens with the Outcomes Report now

This report compliments the suite of documents that have been issued supporting the public consultation on the draft 2019/2021 strategy to prevent and minimise gambling harm consultation document.

The Ministry consultation process has acknowledged the need to reflect and refocus the proposed service plan for the 2019/20 to 2021/22 period to enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of gambling harm minimisation services and to respond to changes in the gambling environment.

MIL OSI

Dancing for Plunket

Source: New Zealand Plunket Society

This week Dancing with the Stars NZ announced that Jude Dobson, beloved 90s TV personality and passionate advocate for children and families, will be appearing on this season’s show – and Plunket is her charity of choice! 

“We are really excited that Jude has chosen to support Plunket,” said Amanda Malu, Plunket Chief Executive.

“Jude has a long association with Plunket. Following her high-profile career as a television presenter, Jude established Raising Children Media to support parents in the child-raising journey with video content.” 

A number of the videos on Raising Children’s website have been developed with Plunket’s input and Jude worked closely with Plunket’s clinical advisors.  

Dancing with the Stars will screen for the first time this season on Sunday 14 April at 7pm on THREE. This year it will feature 12 Kiwi stars who will dance their hearts out on live television, with proceeds from the public votes going to charities like Plunket.

 

0 Comments Posted by Plunket on 4 April 2019

MIL OSI