MIL-OSI UK: Lords debates digital techology and young people

Source: British House Of Lords News

16 January 2019
Members of the Lords, including the chair of children’s digital rights charity 5Rights and a vice president of Barnardos, will debate the relationship between the use of digital technology and the health and wellbeing of children and young people, in the House of Lords on Thursday 17 January.

This is a general debate. They normally take place on a Thursday in the chamber. During debates, members are able to put their experience to good use, discussing current issues and drawing the government’s attention to concerns.
The debate was proposed by Baroness Kidron (Crossbench), chair of children’s digital rights charity 5Rights.
Members expected to take part include:
Baroness Benjamin (Liberal Democrat), broadcaster and vice president of Barnardos
Lord Griffiths of Burry Port (Labour), Lords opposition spokesperson for digital, culture, media and sport
Earl of Listowel (Crossbench), trustee of child welfare charity The Michael Sieff Foundation
Lord Lucas (Conservative), vice chair of the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Digital Identity
Lord Ashton of Hyde (Conservative), parliamentary under-secretary in the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, will respond on behalf of the government.
Further information
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MIL-OSI UK: NHS questioned on care of people with learning disabilities and/or autism

Source: British Parliament News

08 January 2019
The Joint Committee on Human Rights takes evidence from the NHS and the Care Quality Commission for their inquiry into the conditions in learning disability inpatient units.

Purpose of the session
The purpose of the session is:
To question NHS England about the in-patient units that it commissions for the care of people with learning disabilities and/or autism
To question CQC about its inspections of these units.
Topics likely to be covered include:
What are the barriers to reducing the numbers of unsuitable placements?
Why are levels of restraint and solitary confinement so high?
Is the inspection regime able to detect and address poor practice effectively?
Background
In the wake of the Winterbourne View scandal in 2011 it became clear that many people with a learning disability and/ or autism are detained in mental health hospitals inappropriately.
The Department of Health’s national policy response, Transforming Care committed to significantly reduce the numbers. However, despite some progress they remain stubbornly high:
At the end of October 2018 2,350 people were in learning disability and autism inpatient settings down from 2,865 in March 2015 58% of whom had been there for a period of over 2 years.
The number of under 18s in these settings have more than doubled to 250 since March 2015 when there were only 110.
Concerns have been raised in evidence about high and rising levels of restraint and solitary confinement in these institutions.  In 2016, people were recorded as being subjected to restraint on 15,065 occasions. In 2017 this figure had increased by exactly 50%, to 22,620 restraint ‘episodes’. If the projected figures for 2018 are right, the number of times people are restrained is set to increase even further, to 25,812 episodes.
Witnesses
Wednesday 9 January 2019, Committee room 1, Palace of Westminster.
At 3.15pm the Joint Committee on Human Rights will take evidence from:
Dr Paul Lelliott, Deputy Chief Inspector of Hospitals (and lead for mental health), Care Quality Commission
Ray James, National Learning Disability Director, NHS England
Dr Jean O’Hara, National Clinical Director, Learning Disabilities, NHS England
Further information
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MIL-OSI UK: Matt Hancock outlines new prevention-focussed NHS long-term plan

Source: British Parliament News

07 January 2019
Health Secretary Matt Hancock is to outline the NHS’s new ten-year plan in the House of Commons today.

This new long-term plan has a focus on prevention and early detection, with more funding focussed on GPs, community care and mental health. Mental health is due to see a funding increase of £2.3 billion, with GPs and community care getting an extra £4.5 billion.
Transcripts of proceedings in the House of Commons Chamber are available in Hansard online three hours after they happen.
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MIL-OSI UK: Mental Capacity (Amendment) Bill: Commons Stages

Source: British Parliament News

18 December 2018
MPs are to debate the second reading of the Mental Capacity (Amendment) Bill in the House of Commons on Tuesday 18 December 2018.

Second reading
The debate is expected to start at around 5pm, following the emergency debate on UK-EU Brexit negotiations.
Transcripts of proceedings in the House of Commons Chamber are available in Hansard online three hours after they happen.
Mental Capacity (Amendment) Bill
Summary of the Bill
The Bill amends the Mental Capacity Act 2005, which provides a statutory framework for people who lack capacity to make decisions for themselves. The Bill is based on the recommendations of the Law Commission report Mental Capacity and Deprivation of Liberty, which was published together with the Law Commission’s draft Bill in March 2017. 
The Government’s Mental Capacity (Amendment) Bill would reform the process for authorising arrangements which enable people, who lack capacity to consent, to be deprived of their liberty for the purpose ofdelivering their care or treatment. This Government Explanatory Notes states this will include people with severe dementia, learning disabilities, head injuries and autistic spectrum disorder.
Keep up to date with all the proceedings and documentation, including amendment papers, on the Mental Capacity (Amendment) Bill and find out how a Bill becomes an Act of Parliament.
House of Commons Library analysis
The House of Commons Library produces briefing papers to inform MPs and their staff of key issues. The papers contain factual information and a range of opinions on each subject, and aim to be politically impartial.
The Library has published a briefing paper for Second Reading.
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MIL-OSI UK: Health and Social Care (National Data Guardian) Bill: Lords third reading

Source: British Parliament News

13 December 2018
The Health and Social Care (National Data Guardian) Bill had its third reading, a chance to ‘tidy up’ the bill and make changes, in the Lords on Wednesday 12 December.
This is a private member’s bill. A private member’s bill is a type of public bill (that affects the public). Private members’ bills must go through the same set of procedures as other public bills.

No changes were made at third reading.
As both Houses have agreed on the text of the bill it now awaits the final stage of Royal Assent when it will become an Act of Parliament (law).
A date for Royal Assent is yet to be scheduled.
Lords committee stage: Wednesday 28 November
This bill aims to establish, and make provision for, the National Data Guardian for Health and Social Care.
As no changes were suggested to the bill, a motion was agreed that both committee and report stages be dispensed with and that the bill progress directly to third reading. This procedure is known as ‘order of commitment discharged’.
Second reading
The Health and Social Care (National Data Guardian ) Bill had its second reading, the key debate on the draft law’s purpose and principles, on 26 October.
Lords news : Private members’ bills October 2018
Further information
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MIL-OSI UK: Lords debates challenges facing young people

Source: British Parliament News

12 December 2018
Members of the Lords, including a former lecturer in youth and community work at Sunderland Polytechnic and a former health education advisor for the Inner London Education Authority, will debate the challenges facing young people, in the House of Lords on Thursday 13 December.

This is a general debate. They normally take place on a Thursday in the chamber. During debates, members are able to put their experience to good use, discussing current issues and drawing the government’s attention to concerns.
The debate was proposed by Baroness Armstrong of Hill Top (Labour), former lecturer in youth and community work at Sunderland Polytechnic.
Members expected to take part include:
Earl of Listowel (Crossbench), board member and trustee of the Child and Family Practice Charitable Foundation
Baroness Massey of Darwen (Labour), former health education advisor for the Inner London Education Authority
Lord Norton of Louth (Conservative), ambassador for the Albert Kennedy Trust support organisation for homeless LGBT+ young people
Lord Storey (Liberal Democrat), former primary school head teacher and co-chair of the Liberal Democrat PPC on Education, Families and Young People
Lord Agnew of Oulton (Conservative), parliamentary under-secretary in the Department for Education, will respond on behalf of the government.
Further information
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MIL-OSI UK: State of mental health care funding in Northern Ireland examined

Source: British Parliament News

12 December 2018
The Northern Ireland Affairs Committee hears from mental health charities and the Royal College of Psychiatrists in Northern Ireland on the challenges facing mental health services in Northern Ireland.

Witnesses
Wednesday 12 December in the Grimond Room, Portcullis House
At 9.30am
David Babington, Chief Executive, Action Mental Health
Dr Gerry Lynch, Chair of the Royal College of Psychiatrists in Northern Ireland and Vice President of the Royal College of Psychiatrists
Professor Peter McBride, Chief Executive, Inspire
Professor Nichola Rooney, Chair of the British Psychological Society
Purpose of the session
Northern Ireland faces a higher prevalence of mental illness than elsewhere in the UK, and, in the aftermath of the Troubles, Northern Ireland has the highest suicide rate in the UK. More people have died from suicide since the signing of the Belfast Agreement in 1998 than in the 30 years of the Troubles. The Committee considers how these concerning realities should be reflected in health funding decisions in the 2018/19 budget.
There is significant concern that despite Northern Ireland’s high mental illness rates, the proportion of the health budget that is given to mental health remains the lowest in the UK. The Committee will hear about the implications of the mental health funding gap, and how funding could be prioritised to provide more effective care for mental health patients in Northern Ireland. 
Further information
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MIL-OSI UK: Human rights in learning disability inpatient units examined

Source: British Parliament News

10 December 2018
The Joint Committee on Human Rights hears from people with learning disabilities who have been detained, and from family members of people with autism who have been detained.

The purpose
The purpose of the session is to hear about:
The experiences of those with learning disabilities and/or autism of inpatient settings, and the views of families
Their views on restraint and/or isolation in these settings
How they think the human rights of those with learning disabilities and/or autism can be better protected.
Witnesses
Wednesday 12 December, Committee Room 2, Palace of Westminster.
Panel 1
At 3.45pm
Paul Scarrott and Pam Bebbington, My Life My Choice
Pam Bebbington and Paul Scarrott both work with the charity My Life, My Choices, as a self advocacy organisation that seeks to “raise the self-esteem, confidence and quality of life for people with learning disabilities by providing training, employment, volunteering and social opportunities for our members.”
Panel 2
4.15 pm
Julie Newcombe and Jeremy, parents of young people with autismJulie Newcombe is a parent campaigner who co-founded the Rightful Lives exhibition to promote the human rights of people with learning disabilities and/or autism. Her 23 year old son spent 19 months in several inpatient settings.
Jeremy is the father of Bethany, who is kept in isolation and whose treatment has been extensively covered by the media.
Regulation is not enough
Committee Chair Harriet Harman said:

“We are shining a spotlight on the human rights of individuals who are being shut away and made invisible. Regulation is not enough.
The only way to stop abuses is to guarantee the full rights of these children, adults and their families.
We have seen welcome changes towards children on issues such as corporal punishment and learning how to listen to their concerns. Now we need a similar fundamental reassessment of how we are treating people with autism and learning disabilities.”

Further information
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MIL-OSI UK: Mental Capacity (Amendment) Bill: Lords third reading

Source: British Parliament News

10 December 2018
The Mental Capacity (Amendment) Bill has its third reading, a chance to ‘tidy up’ the bill and make changes, in the Lords, on Tuesday 11 December 2018.

Members are expected to discuss consideration of the views of any relevant person about the wishes of the cared-for person, along with the meaning of the term ‘relevant person’. 
Following the completion of third reading, the bill will go to the House of Commons for its consideration.
Lords report stage day two: Tuesday 27 November
Members are expected to discuss a range of subjects including the appointment of an Approved Mental Capacity Professional in the case of disagreement over care arrangements and the settlement of outstanding safeguarding applications prior to the commencement of Act.
There was one division (vote) on a proposed change to the bill.
The vote concerned the insertion of a new clause into the bill entitled ‘Right to Information’.
The clause would ensure that prior to any authorisation of care arrangements, the cared-for individual – or their advocate – are fully informed of their rights, and the responsible body takes necessary steps to explain all possible outcomes and the reasons why the cared-for person may be deprived of their liberty.
The rights of the cared-for individual would include:
the right to an assessment of arrangements by an Approved Mental Capacity professional
the right to an advocate
the right to challenge the authorisation of care arrangements in court
The clause would also ensure:
The Independent Mental Capacity Advocate takes necessary steps to assist the cared-for individual in understanding their care arrangements and rights
The responsible body takes responsibility for referring cases to court when the cared-for individuals exercises their right for judicial review
277 members voted in favour of the new clause and 192 voted against, and so the change was made.
Third reading, a chance to ‘tidy up’ the bill and make changes, is yet to be scheduled.
Lords report stage day one: Wednesday 21 November
Members discussed a range of subjects including education, health and care plans and deprivation of liberty.
There was also one division (vote) on proposed changes (amendments) to the bill.
Members considered a change to the bill which would ensure that the authorisation arrangements for care and treatments are necessary to prevent harm to the cared-for person.
202 members were in favour of this amendment, with 188 against, so the change was made.
Lords committee stage day three: Monday 22 October
Members discussed a range of subjects, including the restriction on power of attorneys, training for home care managers and the duties of the Care Quality Commission.
Lords committee stage day two: Monday 15 October
Members discussed a range of subjects, including the authorisation of home care arrangements, the duty of care providers to ascertain the wishes of the cared-for person and the access of NHS bodies to a clinical ethics committee.
A third day of committee stage is scheduled for 22 October.
Lords committee stage day one: Wednesday 5 September
Members discussed a range of topics, including unlawful deprivation of liberty, advance consent and training for care home managers.
Lords second reading: Monday 16 July
Baroness Barran (Conservative), chair of the Henry Smith Charity, made her maiden speech.
Lord O’Shaughnessy (Conservative), parliamentary under-secretary in the Department of Health and Social Care, responded on behalf of the government.
Mental Capacity (Amendment) Bill summary
This bill will reform the process in the Mental Capacity Act 2005 for authorising arrangements enabling the care or treatment of people who lack capacity to consent to such arrangements, which give rise to a deprivation of their liberty.
Further information
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