Anzac Day 2019: Gallipoli Commemorations

Source: New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade – Safe Travel

Anzac Day 2019: Gallipoli Commemorations

Anzac Day 2019 commemorations in Gallipoli, Turkey
On Anzac Day 2019, we will commemorate the Anzac landings in Gallipoli. This bulletin should be read in conjunction with our Turkey travel advisory.

Safety and security
The Anzac Day Service on the Gallipoli peninsula is a five hour drive from Istanbul. For this region of Turkey, we advise you to exercise increased caution.

There are a number of areas in south-east Turkey that we advise New Zealanders avoid non-essential travel to, and other areas that we advise New Zealanders do not travel to (along the Syrian border, and the city of Diyarbakir). See our Turkey advisory for more information.

We advise that New Zealanders exercise increased caution elsewhere in Turkey, including in Ankara, Istanbul and on the Gallipoli peninsula, due to the heightened threat of terrorism and the potential for civil unrest. For more information on these advice levels, see our Turkey advisory and our About our advisories page.

Terrorism
Terrorist attacks can take place anywhere and at any time in Turkey. Terrorist groups have conducted deadly attacks in Turkey and continue to threaten further attacks. New Zealanders throughout Turkey are advised to exercise a high degree of vigilance in public places, keep themselves informed of potential risks to safety and security by monitoring the media and other local information sources, and following the instructions of local authorities.

Be security conscious around buildings and sites associated with Turkish government and security forces, as well as landmarks and places known to be frequented by foreigners, such as embassies, tourist locations, shopping malls, entertainment areas, public transport, airports, places of worship and identifiably Western businesses. If you are in an area affected by an attack, you should leave the immediate vicinity as soon as it is safe to do so, follow any instructions given by local authorities and let your family know you are safe and well.

The security environment in Turkey may change between now and Anzac Day. We recommend that New Zealanders travelling to Turkey for the Anzac commemorations regularly monitor SafeTravel and our travel advice, which will be kept under close review in the lead up to the event. 

Attending the services
The 2019 Anzac Day commemorative services at Gallipoli will be held on Wednesday 24 and Thursday 25 April. More information on the services, what to expect at Gallipoli and what to bring, can be found here.

New Zealanders attending the 2019 Anzac Day services at Gallipoli will require an attendance pass. This pass can be obtained by registering on the Overseas Commemorations Website.

Security and crowd management at the commemorations are the responsibility of local security staff. Attendees will be subject to airport-style screening at the entrances to sites, including bag searches. Follow the instructions of security staff at all times.

Local health authorities provide limited medical support at the commemorative sites. Support is mostly designed for medical emergencies. Bring your own first aid kit (e.g. sunscreen, band aids and paracetamol) as these are not provided.

Facilities designed for persons with disabilities or restricted mobility are not generally available in Turkey.  Before organising your trip, contact a travel agent, tour operator or the local tourist authority to find out whether local transport, accommodation and attractions will cater for your needs.

Before you go
All domestic and international passenger flights to and from Istanbul Ataturk Airport were transferred to the new Istanbul Airport as of 7 April 2019. For New Zealanders travelling to Turkey, we recommend that you check your flight details with your airline. See our news feature for more information.

All New Zealanders planning on attending the Gallipoli Anzac Day Commemorative Services are encouraged to:

  • Register your details on the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade’s SafeTravel website so that you are made aware of any changes to our travel advice for Turkey and so that we can contact you and account for your well-being in the event of an emergency; and
  • Ensure you have a comprehensive travel insurance policy in place that includes provision for medical evacuation by air. You also need to check which circumstances and activities are covered and not covered by your insurance policy, as limitations can apply.  Your travel insurer should have a 24/7 emergency number.

Consular assistance at Gallipoli 
Consular staff from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade will be in Turkey over the commemorative period to provide on-the-ground consular assistance required by New Zealanders attending the Gallipoli commemorations. For information on the kind of consular assistance the New Zealand Government can and cannot provide, check out the ‘When Things Go Wrong’ tab on the SafeTravel website.

Throughout this period, New Zealanders requiring consular assistance should contact +90 533 284 08 88.  

Emergency numbers:

  • Firefighting and rescue services: 110
  • Ambulance: 112
  • Criminal issues in major cities: 155 (English speakers not always available)
  • Criminal issues in rural areas: 156 (English speakers rarely available).

Foreigners may also contact the Tourist Police in Istanbul on +90 212 527 4503 during office hours.

Associated Advisories:

See the Turkey travel advisory

The New Zealand Embassy Ankara, Turkey

Street Address Kizkulesi Sokak No.11, Gaziosmanpasa, Ankara, Turkey 
Telephone + 90 312 446 3333 
Fax +90 312 446 3317 
Email newzealandembassyankara@gmail.com 
Website http://www.mfat.govt.nz/turkey 
Hours Mon – Fri 0830 – 1700

Associated Advisories:

Share this page:

MIL OSI

Human Rights Commission supports business leaders’ stand against racism

Source: Human Rights Commission

Chief Human Rights Commissioner Paul Hunt has praised the business leaders who are taking a public stand against racism in the workplace.

A group of New Zealand business leaders today published an open letter (www.nzstandtogether.co.nz) calling for a more inclusive country following the Christchurch mosque attacks on 15 March.

I applaud the business leaders who have signed the open letter for speaking out today and giving nothing to racism, Mr Hunt said.

“It’s up to all of us to stand up to racism. Our employers have a crucial role in making sure workplaces are safe and inclusive environments free from discrimination in all forms.”

The group made a joint commitment to further their actions and accountability. As signatories to the open letter, they wrote that they will actively commit to:

  • Creating a culture where words, behaviours and systems that directly or indirectly discriminate against people are not tolerated. This will require an open culture enabling all their organisation’s people to be empowered to speak up when they see casual and systemic discrimination, in a way that supports learning.
  • Supporting their people by giving them access to training, tools and techniques to help them understand what actions and behaviours support – and do not support – inclusivity.
  • Continuously reviewing and updating their organisational-wide processes, such as recruitment, to ensure they remain relevant and promote the diversity and difference needed for organisations, and society to thrive.
  • Celebrating and acknowledging the value of all aspects of diversity and difference in their organisations.

“The message these business leaders are send is an important one. Tackling racism requires all of us to step up. These business leaders promise to be champions of change in our community.”

In 2017 the Human Rights Commission launched it’s Give Nothing To Racism campaign. The  campaign asked Kiwis to acknowledge that racism and prejudice starts small and it needs their support to survive. The campaign encourages people to address small acts of racism that people often let slide.

“I hope other New Zealand businesses get on board with this initiative and work to ensure their workplaces are inclusive, and free from discrimination and racism,” said Mr Hunt.

Organisations can become a signatory to the letter by emailing [email protected] or joining up at www.nzstandtogether.co.nz.

MIL OSI

Senior United Nations official visits Christchurch in the wake of the Mosque attacks

Source: Human Rights Commission

A senior United Nations human rights official is visiting New Zealand this week to show solidarity and learn, at first hand, how communities and the country are responding to the Christchurch Mosque attacks.

Kate Gilmore, the United Nations (UN) Deputy High Commissioner for Human Rights, will be the first major UN official to visit New Zealand in relation to the Christchurch mosque shootings.

She was invited by the New Zealand Human Rights Commission.

Ms Gilmore’s visit will commence tomorrow (Monday 8 April) in Christchurch when she will meet with Mayor Lianne Dalziel.

On Tuesday, she will be the guest speaker at a panel discussion with community groups at the Great Hall Arts Centre, co-hosted by Christchurch City Council and the New Zealand Human Rights Commission.

Ms Gilmore says she is extremely honoured to have the privilege of meeting with the Mayor, Councillors and community.

“The local events of March have also a global significance. In the aftermath of such shock, loss and sorrow, the universal principles and the city’s local practices of human rights are reaffirming and asserting our common humanity. ” says Ms Gilmore.

New Zealand’s Chief Human Rights Commissioner Paul Hunt says Ms Gilmore’s visit underlines the international attention that has been focused on New Zealand’s response to the tragedy, as well as the human rights implications of the mosque shootings. 

“Many people around the world have admired the response of local leaders and the public in the immediate period after the shootings. Interest is growing in what we do in the long term to address the issues raised by the attacks.”

The Commission believes that Ms Gilmore’s visit will be helpful as she knows the region well and she will be able to provide a global perspective on how other communities and countries have recovered from similar tragedies. 

Mr Hunt says that as well as hearing the experiences of community groups, iwi and the people of Christchurch, Ms Gilmore is likely to be involved in discussions about human rights, hate speech, gun laws and the responsibilities of social media companies.

Ms Gilmore will be in New Zealand from Sunday 7 – Thursday 11 April. After Christchurch she will head to Wellington and Auckland for meetings with officials and community leaders. 

MIL OSI

Putting indigenous rights into action in Aotearoa

Source: Human Rights Commission

The UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples was adopted by the United Nations in 2007 and supported by New Zealand in 2010. It sets out human rights standards that align with and support our own Treaty of Waitangi and has been described as “a blueprint for implementing Te Tiriti”.

But how is it being put into action? What more needs to be done?  The New Zealand Government has announced it will work with Iwi and Māori to develop a strategy or action plan for the Declaration.  What should this look like?  How do you want to be involved?

Visit by UN Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

A group of independent indigenous Experts have been invited to visit Aotearoa in April to assist. The three expert members of the UN body known as the ‘EMRIP’ have agreed to provide advice on developing an action plan or strategy to support the Declaration, and how this could be done through an inclusive process that is in line with global best practice. 

They want to hear from Māori communities and organisations: 

  • about how the Declaration is being implemented in Aotearoa
  • any policies, strategies or good practices already in place
  • what is needed from any action plan that is developed to advance the Declaration.  

The two hui will happen in Auckland and Wellington.

Auckland Hui
When: 10 am – 2 pm Tuesday 9 April 2019
Where: Hoani Waititi Marae, 451 West Coast Road, Oratia

Wellington Hui
When: 10am – 2pm, Friday 12 April 2019
Where: Pipitea Marae, 55-59 Thorndon Quay, Pipitea

At the conclusion of the hui (2.30pm) there will also be an information session for people interested in attending the EMRIP’s annual meeting, to be held from 15-19 July in Geneva.  

RSVP Please register to confirm your attendance and for catering purposes. Please RSVP to [email protected]  

An action plan for the Declaration 

New Zealand supported the Declaration in 2010.  There are a range of policies and strategies in place that are relevant, but no overall strategy or plan for how the rights in the Declaration will be achieved.  

The Minister for Māori Development, Hon. Nanaia Mahuta, has just announced that the government will develop a national action plan this year, saying: “The Declaration plan will identify specific actions that can make real progress on the aspirations of Māori as the tangata whenua of Aotearoa”.  Work on the Declaration plan will begin soon and will include engagement with Māori in the second half of 2019.

The EMRIP visit is to seek expert advice to inform that work, and to begin discussions with communities and local experts about how the Declaration can be put into action in a meaningful and effective way. 

These hui with the EMRIP members are so they can hear from Māori about what an action plan or national strategy needs to do and how it can best be developed. 

Further information about the EMRIP

The EMRIP is one of three UN expert bodies that focus specifically on the rights of Indigenous Peoples. It is made up of seven independent experts who are appointed by the Human Rights Council to provide advice and expertise on Indigenous Peoples’ rights.  

Three EMRIP members will be involved in the visit to New Zealand.  The visiting indigenous experts are: Ms Laila Vars (from Norway), Ms Megan Davis (Australia) and Mr Edtami Mansayagan (Philippines).   

Country visits are a recent addition to the EMRIP’s advisory role, enabling Governments and Indigenous Peoples to seek specific guidance on how the Declaration can be applied in their particular national context.  New Zealand will be only the third country to receive a visit by the EMRIP.  

The EMRIP members have been invited to New Zealand by the Aotearoa Independent Monitoring Mechanism for the Declaration and the Human Rights Commission, and with the agreement of the New Zealand Government.

The purpose of the EMRIP’s visit is to: provide advice to support an action plan, including advice on the objectives, key focus areas and specific measures to implement the Declaration. They will also advise on the process for developing the plan or strategy, to ensure that this is done in a way that enables the participation of Māori whānau, hapū, iwi and organisations throughout.

During their visit, the EMRIP members will meet with various organisations and experts, hold two hui (in Auckland and Wellington) and will also meet with Government.

The visit is not to review or judge New Zealand’s progress so far, but is to assist the Government, Māori and others to strengthen implementation of the Declaration going forward.

Further information about the EMRIP can be found on their website here.

Contact

For further information about the hui or to discuss any accessibility, dietary or other requirements, please contact: Jessica ([email protected]; 0220130443) or Paula ([email protected]; 0220130488) at the Human Rights Commission.

MIL OSI

Tackling racism, islamophobia and hate in New Zealand

Source: Human Rights Commission

By Paul Hunt, Chief Human Rights Commissioner

Following the attack on two mosques, leaving many dead and injured, on 15th March 2019 in Christchurch, the Chief Commissioner spoke at Otago University as part of the University’s Give Nothing to Racism campaign. These are extended extracts, with slight revisions, from the Chief Commissioner’s remarks:

The calamity in Christchurch

Three of us from the Human Rights Commission were in Christchurch within hours of the massacre.

Our aims were modest – to demonstrate solidarity; to listen; and to provide practical support when requested, which it was, and we responded.

Some stories were unspeakably harrowing.

Over three days, we spent time in the ‘hub’ which was organised to support the affected Muslim communities.

This ‘hub’ was busy. It provided a range of services, such as health, legal, police and other support services. And it also provided food and places for prayer.

The media were not allowed into the ‘hub’ and I do not feel it’s right for me to provide a journalistic account of our experiences. But I would like to make a few short observations.

There was a sense of unity across the affected Muslim communities, tangata whenua and mana whenua, and the people of Christchurch.

The Muslim communities did not have a bad word for New Zealand. Just the reverse. Despite everything, they love the place.

Despite their trauma and exhaustion, they also demonstrate enormous dignity.

While the elders were pillars of strength, the young people were remarkable, dynamic, very smart, and inspirational.

We were often told that long term support and solidarity is essential. Not gadfly interest – here today and gone tomorrow – but a commitment to the long haul.

This is the backcloth against which I would like to make a few remarks for Race Relations Day 2019.

These remarks only scratch the surface of a few of the relevant issues.

I hope to dig more deeply on other occasions.

Human rights in New Zealand

New Zealand has one of the best human rights records in the world – but look across the globe, the competition is not great.

We are a richly diverse multicultural society based on the Māori-Crown partnership established by the Treaty of Waitangi.

Aotearoa welcomes people from all religions, ethnicities and backgrounds.

For many of us, it is a very fine place to live.

New Zealand is a well-established democracy and it should have the maturity to recognise it has major human rights problems.

A few weeks ago, Minister of Justice Andrew Little flew to Geneva and presented New Zealand’s human rights report card to the apex human rights institution in the United Nations.

Here is one short quotation from the Minister’s thoughtful human rights survey:

“The impacts of colonisation continue to be felt today, through entrenched structural racism and poorer outcomes for Maori.”

A powerful statement.

If the Minister of Justice can be this candid about New Zealand’s human rights situation, so must everyone else.

I took up the post of Chief Human Rights Commissioner a few weeks ago and, as some of my colleagues will testify, I felt there was a sense of complacency in New Zealand about the country’s human rights situation.

I hope that complacency has now evaporated.

It’s not treasonable to ask: what are New Zealand’s major human rights problems?

One is poverty.

There are unacceptable levels of poverty in New Zealand – and poverty is a human rights issue. Poverty is also highly relevant to Race Relations Day because people of colour are disproportionately represented in the poverty data.

This afternoon, I begin, here in Otago, a number of nationwide visits, planned since January, which will take place over the next weeks and months, to enable me to listen to, and learn from, people and communities affected by the impacts of poverty and inequality. My hosts this afternoon are the members of the Corstorphine Community Hub – and I am very grateful to them.

In keeping with the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, I adopt a holistic approach to human rights: equality and non-discrimination; civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights; the right to a safe environment; and the rights of indigenous peoples.

Apart from poverty, a major human rights problem in New Zealand is racism.

Another: Islamophobia.

Of course there are numerous other human rights problems in New Zealand.

Nonetheless, given the catastrophe in Christchurch last week, my remarks will focus on racism, Islamophobia and related issues.

I will leave poverty and other issues for another occasion.

Racism and Islamophobia are not the same thing, but they are closely related.

Sometimes I will elide between them, while recognising they are distinct phenomenon.

How to begin to respond to the events in Christchurch?

The calamity in Christchurch demonstrates that New Zealand’s geographical isolation does not protect us from violent, transnational, neo-fascist ideology.

For a long time, Professor Paul Spoonley from Massey University has warned about the white supremacist nationalist politics festering in New Zealand.

Susan Devoy, our former Race Relations Commissioner, has graphically described how the Muslim community in New Zealand has experienced hatred and abuse in recent years.

In the shadow of the Christchurch attacks, Anjum Rahman of the Islamic Women’s Council of New Zealand, explains that for years Muslim representatives knocked on every door they could, spoke at every possible forum and pointed to the rise of the alt-right in New Zealand. Shaking with rage she writes: “We warned you. We begged. We pleaded.”

While I was in Christchurch, in solidarity with the Muslim community, I saw a large swastika painted in the middle of a busy road. It was daubed within hours of the attacks on the nearby mosques.

How can we resist this virulent right-wing extremism?

First, we have to recognise it exists in Aotearoa New Zealand.

Friends, don’t argue the coward killer was from outside and that Australia has a problem and we don’t.

There is a problem of racism, Islamophobia and right-wing extremism in New Zealand. Together we can tackle it. But only if we recognise it exists in our country.

We have to shout from the roof-tops that we will never compromise our commitment to diversity, respect, dignity and equality.

These values lie at the heart of our multi-culturalism which, as already mentioned, is based on the Māori-Crown partnership established by the Treaty of Waitangi.

Crucially, these values are embedded in our legally binding national and international human rights standards.

We must urgently refresh – and reaffirm – these human rights for modern times.

We have to ensure that human rights are confined neither to the halls of the United Nations nor the courts of our judicial system. Human rights are not the preserve of lawyers.

At root, human rights are about ensuring a secure, safe, dignified life for all. They are concerned with the everyday lives of all individuals and communities in Aotearoa New Zealand.

Human rights require that space is available for the active and informed participation of disadvantaged or vulnerable communities, whether Muslims in Christchurch or those struggling to have a decent life anywhere in these islands.

No public figure or commentator should ever use language that disrespects any of our diverse communities, including religious groups, ethnic communities, tangata whenua, Pasific peoples, immigrants and refugees, disabled people, women and girls, and members of the Rainbow community.

This is not ‘political correctness gone mad’. It is a matter of life, death and human rights. Disrespectful words and actions give permission for discrimination, harassment and violence, a point I return to shortly.

Responsibilities of internet and social media companies

We need a mature discussion about internet and social media companies which disseminate hate through their platforms. A couple of days ago the Prime Minister put it like this:

“We cannot simply sit back and accept that these platforms just exist and that what is said on them is not the responsibility of the place where they are published. They are the publisher. Not just the postman. There cannot be a case of all profit, no responsibility.”

Companies not only have “responsibility”, as the Prime Minister puts it, they also have human rights responsibilities.Of course, the primary human rights duty-bearer is the state and its agents.But for some years, member states working in the United Nations, including New Zealand, have recognised that transnational corporations, and other business enterprises, have human rights responsibilities.After all, some transnational corporations wield far more public power than some states, so why should such companies escape human rights responsibilities and the corresponding accountability?These arguments are strongly resisted in some quarters, but I am only applying, to internet and social media companies, some of the mainstream human rights thinking in the United Nations.

Hate speech is not free speech

A sensible discussion about our current hate speech laws is long overdue.

The main laws covering “hate speech” in New Zealand are found in the Human Rights Act and the Harmful Digital Communications Act. These laws have to be interpreted in the context of the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act, which affirms the right to freedom of expression.  

This legal framework has grave anomalies.

For example, the HRA prohibits the “incitement of disharmony” on the basis of race, ethnicity, colour or national origins (s.61). But it does not cover incitement for reasons of religion, gender, disability or sexual orientation.  

Why on earth not?

Why does the law prohibit the incitement of hostility against someone because of their race or color – but not because of their religion – or their sexual orientation – or because they have a disability?

It’s not rocket science: every member of our community should feel safe.

Nobody should be permitted to incite hostility because somebody else has a different religion – or because they have a partner of the same sex – or because they use a wheelchair.

Of course we need vigorous debate about controversial issues – and of course sometimes we will offend people or be offended. That is all part of the robust exchange of ideas in a democratic society.  But this does not mean we can use freedom of expression as a weapon to infringe the fundamental rights of others.

Hate speech is not free speech.

Very few human rights are absolute. The prohibition against torture is among the small handful of exceptions. Balance is a foundational human rights concept. Often a fair and reasonable balance has to be struck between competing rights. In New Zealand, we are already very familiar with striking human rights balances between, for example, freedom of information and the right to privacy.

In short, freedom of speech must not be used as a weapon against others.

It has to be balanced with the right to enjoy a safe, secure, dignified life.

New Zealand should set the legal terms of this balance by way of an open, inclusive, constructive, respectful, democratic process. And then the courts have to actually apply — or strike — this balance in appropriate cases as best they can.

Improved data on hate crimes

For some years, the Human Rights Commission has called for improved data collection on hate-motivated crimes. At present we do not have statistics about crimes that occur because of a person’s religion, colour, race or ethnicity, or other important personal characteristics such as sexual orientation, gender identity or disability. Without such data, we do not know the scale and scope of the problem and so cannot design, implement and evaluate an effective response.

Study on – and national plan of action against – extremism

We also need a thorough study on, and a national plan of action against, extremism in Aotearoa New Zealand.

From casual racism to 15th March, Christchurch

A few weeks ago, I made some remarks to commemorate Holocaust Remembrance Day.

With the Holocaust in mind, I argued that casual racism can lead to stereotyping; and stereotyping can lead to ‘othering’ – that is, seeing other humans as somehow alien; and ‘othering’ can lead to demonising; and demonising can lead to genocide.

Today, I wish to revise that.

Casual racism can lead to stereotyping; then ‘othering’; then demonising; and then 15th March, Christchurch.

Casual racism offends, disempowers, constrains.

Remember Gulliver. He was washed up on the shores of Lilliput, a country inhabited by little people. He awakes to find himself bound by thousands of ropes. Each rope is short and slight and seems inconsequential. But their cumulative effect is to tie Gulliver down. Their cumulative effect is to hold him back.

And that’s like the insidious impact of multiple, daily incidents of casual racism.

Also, we know from history that if we don’t take casual racism seriously – if we don’t take casual Islamophobia seriously – this can, in due course, lead to terrible violent consequences on communities who are quietly going about their daily lives.

So it’s imperative we give nothing to racism, as set out in the Human Rights Commission’s award-winning campaign, fronted by Taika Waititi and numerous other brilliant Kiwis.

And it’s imperative we give nothing to Islamophobia.

But we must go further. We need to grasp the rich diversity of New Zealand society. We need to look for ways to engage with people from other cultures, religions and communities. At every chance we must promote and maintain harmonious relations and ensure the protection of human rights for everyone.

Friends, join a community group and reach out in friendship to another community with a richly different fabric from your own.

Our country must become a global champion of anti-racism, anti-Islamophobia and human rights for all.

In this way we’ll honour the victims of last week’s shocking calamity.

To our Muslim brothers and sisters: never forget that we stand by you. We will do whatever we can to support you, now and in the future.

MIL OSI

New research scrutinises New Zealand’s largest pay rise for women

Source: Human Rights Commission

New research by the New Zealand Work Research Institute at Auckland University of Technology (AUT) and the Human Rights Commission has for the first time revealed the challenges and advantages of New Zealand’s largest pay increase for women.  

“The Value of Care – evaluating the impact of the 2017 pay equity settlement of the aged residential, home and community and disability sectors” examines the impact of the $2 billion pay equity settlement, which increased pay for 55,000 workers in a female dominated workforce who had largely been paid the minimum wage. 

Nearly 70 staff, including both managers and care and support workers, across the aged care, home and community care and disability support sectors spoke to lead researchers Associate Professor Katherine Ravenswood and Dr Julie Douglas about the impact of the pay equity settlement.  

“This research is world leading. It is especially rare for a female-dominated sector to receive a large pay rise. Now, for the first time we can understand the impact of paying carers a living wage,” says the Equal Employment Opportunities Commissioner Saunoamaali’i Dr Karanina Sumeo. 

“There are some heart-warming stories of how the pay settlement has dramatically affected workers. One carer told us she was able to buy glasses for the first time while another was able to afford a visit to the dentist. It’s these simple everyday improvements that enhance the quality of life,” says Dr Sumeo.  

The research has also revealed pay increases for the sector were welcomed universally by employers and workers as long overdue recognition.   

“What this research shows us is this workforce really appreciated the recognition of their work and skills,” says Associate Professor Ravenswood.   

“They’d been underpaid and underappreciated for so long. Many had struggled to make ends meet on their low wages. Now they can go to the doctor, have a holiday away from home, and some can even reduce their hours so they can spend time with their own family,” she says.

“The pay equity settlement values their work as it should be and says that these women are an important part of our society”.  

Interestingly, the research has uncovered some unintended consequences from the settlement.  

“We were dismayed to find that the way the pay equity settlement was implemented means some managers and organisations have reduced employees’ hours. The result is some workers are financially worse off and have less certainty in their work” said Dr Douglas.  

“We also found that, in reality, the new financial value of the work wasn’t accepted, and some managers gave more work to their care and support workers, or even delegated nursing tasks to them because they were now paid more” said Associate Professor Ravenswood.  

The researchers expect that as the 2017 Pay Equity Settlement continues to be implemented, some of these issues will resolve as people understand previous low wages were caused by gender discrimination, not what the jobs were actually worth. Some policy changes to funding and other requirements under the settlement will also smooth the way for this settlement and any future ones.  

“What these issues highlight is that the sector, in both clinical and non-clinical roles is underfunded. I urge the Government to implement the recommendations of the research, including developing a clear and consistent funding model, which fully funds the sector”, says Saunoamaali’i Dr Karanina Sumeo.  

The Human Rights Commission, NZ Work Research Institute and Careerforce funded the research. 

Click here to download the report.


Notes:  

From 1st July 2017 onwards, 55,000 state-subsidised care and support workers received a pay rise under the Care and Support Workers (Pay Equity) Settlement Agreement.  

This pay settlement, which was a result of the Kristine Bartlett successful equal pay claim, removed wage discrimination based on gender for care and support workers.  

The $2 billion settlement is being introduced over a five-year period and will see workers’ wages increase up to $27 an hour during that time.  

“The Value of Care” research examines how the settlement impacts the retention and recruitment of carers, composition of the workforce, carer’s financial status, use of government support and choices around rostering and hours of work.  

About the New Zealand Work Research Institute (NZWRI):

The New Zealand Work Research Institute (NZWRI) conducts enquiry-driven research to explore the issues affecting people and work. A multidisciplinary team conducts analysis of both national and international issues that ticks the box for both academic rigour and relevance to change makers in business, government and the community in general.  

NZWRI is based at Faculty of Business, Economics and Law, Auckland University of Technology (AUT). 

For any media enquiries, or to request a high-resolution image, please contact: Helen Twose, Communications Manager, Business, Economics and Law Auckland University of Technology 

M: +64 (0)21 723 657
E: [email protected] 

MIL OSI

Multiculturalism and diversity is us

Source: Human Rights Commission

By Pancha Narayanan and Paul Hunt

We are all in sorrow and mourning with the loss of our Muslim brothers and sisters who were targeted in the terrible Christchurch mosque attacks on Friday 15 March.

Each of us is grieving. With this grief we will also all be reflecting on what has happened and soon demanding answers. However, today, March 21 has a specific meaning for our diverse multicultural community. It is Race Relations Day.

Race Relations Day is observed around the world annually in conjunction with the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination. The day was initially recognised to commemorate the 69 people – including 10 children –  were killed while peacefully protesting Apartheid laws in Sharpeville in 1960.

It is a day we usually join together to reflect on how we work on the elimination of racial discrimination from society and share in one another’s diverse cultures. This message is even more pertinent this year for horrific reasons.

It is with heavy hearts that this year the day will mean we are all reflecting on those who died.

Let us remember them; learn their names and their stories; and honour their lives and their legacies. We must take the time to reflect following these terrible events at two Christchurch mosques on Friday.

The strength and the resolve of our communities not to give in to hatred has been shown as New Zealanders embrace one another to comfort, console and stand with each other in these sad times. People of all cultures and faiths have come together to show their grief in this difficult time, with an outpouring of solidarity and unity with our Muslim brothers and sisters.

As we grieve, it is also a time to reflect on the country we want to build. We must become a Treaty-based multicultural society.

The theme of this year’s Race Relations Day – ‘O tātou iwi, ō tātou ahurea, ō tātou reo – our people, our cultures, our languages’ – reflects the diversity we need to embrace as we continue the work of building a harmonious society.

More will be said in the coming weeks about what needs to change.

This Race Relations Day, we call on all New Zealanders to take time out of their day to reflect. To stand united in mourning with victims of Christchurch. To make personal and collective commitments to stand united against racism and hate whenever we see it.

We also encourage all New Zealanders to attend one of the multicultural days that will be running around the country until May 11, as part of an extended marking of Race Relations Day.

Give nothing to racism. Give nothing to hate. Give to Treaty-based multiculturalism, diversity, the promotion of peace this Race Relation Day.

More information on the multicultural events you can attend can be found here.

This was originally published on The Spinoff.

MIL OSI

Race Relations Day a chance to remember the victims and survivors of Christchurch attacks

Source: Human Rights Commission

Race Relations Day (Thursday 21 March) provides a chance to remember the victims and survivors of the attacks in Christchurch and reflect on how we can create a more harmonious society, Pancha Narayanan, National President of Multicultural New Zealand says.

This year we will mark Race Relations Day with heavy hearts as we remember the 50 people who lost their lives while peacefully worshipping,” Mr Narayanan says.

Race Relations Day is observed around the world, annually on March 21 in conjunction with the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination. The day was initially recognised to commemorate the 69 people – including 10 children –  who were killed while peacefully protesting Apartheid laws in Sharpeville in 1960.

“Let us mark this important day by remembering those who died; learn their names and their stories; and honour their lives and their legacies.

We would also call for New Zealanders to take part in the two-minute silence on Friday announced by Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, Mr Narayanan says.

“In these sad times the strength and the resolve of our community not to give in to hatred has been shown as New Zealanders embrace one another to comfort and console,” Mr Narayanan says.

“People of all cultures and faiths have come together to show their grief in this difficult time, with an outpouring of solidarity and unity with our Muslim brothers and sisters.

“As we remember, it is also a time to reflect on the country we want to build. Becoming a Treaty-based multicultural society will not come without hard work. We must listen to each other and work collectively to make it happen, Mr Narayanan says.

“Let us stand united against racism and hate wherever and whenever we see it.”

Chief Human Rights Commissioner, Paul Hunt, called on New Zealanders to take the time to remember this Race Relations Day and connect with each other.

“The theme of this year’s Race Relations Day – ‘O tātou iwi, ō tātou ahurea, ō tātou reo – our people, our cultures, our languages’ – reflects the diversity we need to embrace as we continue the work of building a harmonious society,” Mr Hunt says.


Multicultural New Zealand (the Federation of Multicultural Councils Inc.) is a national organisation presides over 23 constituent regional multicultural councils and 38 Newcomers Network throughout New Zealand and national councils for women, youth, seniors and business. More information can be found at www.multiculturalnz.org.nz

For more information, contact [email protected]

MIL OSI

Tropical Cyclone Idai

Source: New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade – Safe Travel

Tropical Cyclone Idai

On 15 March 2019, tropical cyclone Idai made landfall at the port city of Beira in Mozambique, causing flooding, high winds and mud slides which has left a trail of destruction in Mozambique, Malawi and Zimbabwe.

 

If you are in the affected area or areas potentially affected by the flooding and mudslides you should follow the advice of the local authorities at all times, exercise caution and monitor local media for any developments. Please also keep your family back in New Zealand informed of your well-being.

 

New Zealanders in Mozambique, Malawi and Zimbabwe requiring consular assistance can contact the New Zealand High Commission in South Africa on +27 12 435 9000 or via email at enquiries@nzhc.co.za

Associated Advisories:

Share this page:

Share this page:

Latest News features

MIL OSI

Paul Hunt: We must give nothing to racism and Islamophobia

Source: Human Rights Commission

The calamity in Christchurch demonstrates that New Zealand’s geographical isolation does not protect us from violent, transnational, neo-fascist ideology.

For a long time, Professor Paul Spoonley from Massey University has warned about the white supremacist nationalist politics festering in New Zealand. Susan Devoy, our former Race Relations Commissioner, has graphically described how the Muslim community in New Zealand has experienced hatred and abuse in recent years.

In the shadow of the Christchurch attacks, Anjum Rahman ,of the Islamic Women’s Council of New Zealand, explains that for years Muslim representatives knocked on every door they could, spoke at every possible forum and pointed to the rise of the alt-right in New Zealand. Quaking with rage, she writes: “We warned you. We begged. We pleaded.”

While I have been in Christchurch, in solidarity with the Muslim community, listening to survivors and community leaders, I have seen a large swastika painted in the middle of a busy road. It was daubed within hours of the attacks on the nearby mosques.

Amidst our shock and grief, many of us ask how can we resist this virulent right-wing extremism?

We have to recognise it exists and shout from the roof-tops that we will never compromise our commitment to tolerance, diversity, respect, dignity and equality.

These values lie at the heart of our multi-culturalism, which is based on the Māori-Crown partnership established by the Treaty of Waitangi.

Crucially, these values are embedded in our legally binding national and international human rights standards.

We must urgently refresh – and reaffirm – these human rights for modern times.

We have to ensure that human rights are confined neither to the halls of the United Nations nor the courts of our judicial system. Human rights are not the preserve of lawyers.

At root, human rights are about ensuring a secure, safe, dignified life for all. They are concerned with the everyday lives of all individuals and communities in Aotearoa New Zealand. They are the birthright of us all.

Human rights require us to listen to and support disadvantaged or vulnerable communities, whether Muslims in Christchurch or those struggling to have a decent life anywhere in these islands.

No public figure or commentator should ever use language that disrespects any of our diverse communities, including religious groups, ethnic communities, tangata whenua, Pacific peoples, immigrants and refugees, disabled people, women and girls, and members of the Rainbow community.

This is not “political correctness gone mad”. It is a matter of life, death and human rights. Disrespectful words and actions give permission for discrimination, harassment and violence.

We need a mature discussion about internet and social media companies who disseminate hate through their platforms; media who spread messages of division and minimise racist acts; leaders who exploit these messages for their own political gain; and the ‘she’ll be right’ attitude that masks and maintains racism in our society.

We must clarify the human rights responsibilities of social media and other companies. A sensible dialogue about our current hate speech laws is long overdue. We also need a thorough study on, and a national plan of action against, xenophobic extremism in Aotearoa New Zealand.

The Human Rights Commission has called for improved data collection on hate-motivated crimes. At present New Zealand does not have statistics about crimes that occur because of a person’s religion, colour, race or ethnicity, or other important personal characteristics such as sexual orientation, gender identity or disability. Without such data, we do not know the scale and scope of the problem and so cannot design, implement and evaluate an effective response.

The United Nations also made recommendations about our laws relating to hate speech and racial hatred and the importance of collecting comprehensive data on these matters.

We must all commit to giving nothing to racism and Islamophobia, in line with the commission’s campaign.

But we must go further. We need to grasp the rich diversity of New Zealand’s society. We need to look for ways to engage with people from other cultures, religions and communities. At every chance we must promote and maintain harmonious relations and ensure the protection of human rights for everyone.

Our country must become a global champion of anti-racism, anti-Islamophobia and human rights for all.

In this way we’ll honour the victims of last week’s shocking calamity.

To our Muslim brothers and sisters: never forget that we stand by you. We will do whatever we can to support you, now and in the future.

Paul Hunt is the Chief Human Rights Commissioner at the New Zealand Human Rights Commission and formerly an independent human rights expert with the United Nations.

This was originally published in The Press.

MIL OSI