MIL-OSI UK: Home Secretary questioned again about citizens’ rights after Brexit

Source: British House Of Lords News

21 January 2019
As part of their follow-up work on citizens’ rights after Brexit, the House of Lords EU Justice Sub-Committee again hears from the Rt Hon Sajid Javid, Home Secretary, and Mr Glyn Williams, Director-General of Borders, Immigration and Citizenship System Policy and Strategy Group, Home Office.

Witnesses
Tuesday 22 January in Committee Room 3, Palace of Westminster
At 2.30pm
The Rt Hon. Sajid Javid MP, Home Secretary
Mr Glyn Williams, Director-General of Borders, Immigration and Citizenship System Policy and Strategy Group, Home Office
Background
Home Secretary Sajid Javid is being questioned by members of the House of Lords EU Justice Sub-Committee on Tuesday 22 January in a follow-up session on citizens’ rights post-Brexit.  The Home Secretary gave evidence to the Committee on 21 June 2018 where assurances were given about the UK having a welcoming attitude to EU citizens who live in the UK, and that lessons were being learned from the Windrush scandal.  
This follow-up session will focus on advertising and promotional materials for settled status, process, documentation and trials, eligibility criteria, reciprocal arrangements and no deal preparations. 
Further information

MIL-OSI UK News

MIL-OSI UK: Home Secretary to give a statement on migrant crossings

Source: British Parliament News

07 January 2019
Home Secretary, Sajid Javid, will give a statement in the House of Commons today on migrant crossings.

Over the Christmas period, Sajid Javid described the number of people attempting to cross the English Channel as a ‘major incident’.
Speaking to The Guardian, Yvette Cooper, Chair of the Home Affairs Select Committee, claimed “for families and children to end up in small boats in the Channel in the middle of winter is incredibly dangerous.”
Transcripts of proceedings in the House of Commons Chamber are available in Hansard online three hours after they happen.
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MIL-OSI UK: Lords debates Islamophobia in the UK

Source: British Parliament News

19 December 2018
Members of the Lords, including the chair of the National Commission on Muslim Women and the former deputy chair of the Commission for Racial Equality, will debate the impact of Islamophobia in the United Kingdom, in the House of Lords on Thursday 20 December.

This is a balloted debate. They normally take place on a Thursday in the chamber. During debates, members are able to put their experience to good use, discussing current issues and drawing the government’s attention to concerns.
The debate was proposed by Lord Sheikh (Conservative), vice chair of the All Party Parliamentary Group on Race and Community.
Members expected to take part include:
Baroness Afshar (Crossbench), chair of the Communication Committee at the British Muslim Research Centre
Baroness Burt of Solihull (Liberal Democrat), former shadow Secretary of State for Equalities
Lord Parekh (Labour), former deputy chair of the Commission for Racial Equality
Baroness Uddin (Non-affiliated), chair of the National Commission on Muslim Women
Baroness Warsi (Conservative), treasurer of the All Party Parliamentary Group on British Muslims
Lord Bourne of Aberystwyth (Conservative), parliamentary under-secretary in the Department for Housing, Communities and Local Government, will respond on behalf of the government.
Further information
Image: iStockphoto

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MIL-OSI UK: Home Secretary gives statement on immigration White Paper

Source: British House of Commons News

19 December 2018
Home Secretary, Sajid Javid, has given a statement in the House of Commons on the Government’s immigration White Paper.

Following the publication of the Government’s White Paper on immigration, the Home Secretary, Sajid Javid, announced details from the paper to the House of Commons.The Home Secretary confirmed free movement would end after the UK leaves the EU and that to implement this the Government would introduce the Immigration and Social Security Coordination EU Withdrawal Bill. He also announced that there will be a single immigration system for all nationalities. He also confirmed that the UK would introduce a skills based system to attract those who can assist the UK economy.The Home Secretary concluded that the new immigration approach “…will ensure that the UK continues to flourish outside the EU.”
The Shadow Home Secretary, Diane Abbott, responded to the statement on behalf of the Opposition and commented on the delay on the publication of the White Paper. She claimed that the statement did not “meet the need of the hour..” She went on to say Brexit offered an opportunity to put in place ..”an efficient, fair and non-discriminatory immigration system..” and that the White Paper fell short of offering that.
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MIL-OSI UK: Sajid Javid refuses to confirm Tory immigration target

Source: Labour List UK

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“There is no specific target.” So the ‘hundreds of thousands’ objective has been abandoned? “We remain committed to our manifesto.” Home Secretary Sajid Javid couldn’t keep his story straight in his shambles of an interview on Radio 4’s Today this morning. Theresa May has stubbornly refused to acknowledge (stop me if you think you’ve heard this one before) that her net migration target, which has proved to be unrealistic as well as unwise, should be dropped in the face of criticism from all sides.

The Prime Minister has been fixated on bringing down immigration levels in the UK since being Home Secretary herself, and her ‘under 100,000 pledge’ has been in place since 2010, though the Tories haven’t come close to achieving it. May’s blinkered view of this policy area has caused untold harm: the ‘Go Home’ vans; the hostile environment; the Windrush scandal. And her Home Secretary is too ashamed of her target to say it on Radio 4, although it remains party policy.

It has taken 18 months but the government finally releases its white paper on immigration today. You’d think that after multiple delays its proposals would have been agreed on and settled, but we’re talking about this chaotic government. Another year of consultation will be undertaken, and cabinet members are divided over the central proposal – a minimum salary threshold of £30,000 a year, applied to EU as well non-EU workers, for five-year visas.

This is being pitched as a skills-based immigration system, but senior ministers as well as Labour point out that this is actually income-based. As Diane Abbott commented: “The government has disgracefully labelled workers on less than £30,000 as low-skilled. Our economy and public services are kept ticking by this majority of workers.” The Tory post-Brexit system would exclude nurses, social care workers and other staff in key sectors “in which we have severe skills or labour shortages”.

Most people assume Javid’s opposite, the left-wing Diane Abbott, will respond to the Tories with a simple pro-immigration message. They’re right to think the Shadow Home Secretary, and Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour Party more widely, wouldn’t resort to dogwhistle racism or pander to prejudice. It doesn’t have a numerical target. But Labour’s alternative is more nuanced than often assumed – the party pledged hundreds of extra border guards in the last manifesto, for instance. What could be made clearer is that Tory management of immigration is not only unfair, damaging to society and dangerous for individuals, but also unworkable.

The Home Office is not fit for purpose, and that’s partly down to the complicated, punitive nature of our current rules. As a parliamentary caseworker, I remember one constituent who we were told was a terrorist who had participated in acts classified as crimes against humanity. Yet he had discretionary leave to remain granted repeatedly while the Home Office considered his application – because the department is that overwhelmed. This is the kind of story those concerned about immigration would be horrified by, and its events are more likely under a dysfunctional system presided over by this government. So much for the Tories being tougher on immigration.

Sienna @siennamarla

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