MIL-OSI UK: Former Defence Secretary gives evidence on nuclear issues

Source: British Parliament News

11 January 2019
The International Relations Committee takes evidence on nuclear risk, the challenges facing the current non-proliferation regime, the UK Position on the on the Ban Treaty, and the UK approach to the 2020 Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference.

Witnesses
Wednesday 16 January in Committee Room 2, Palace of Westminster
At 11.50am
The Rt Hon Lord Browne of Ladyton, former Secretary of State for Defence (2006-2008), Vice-Chair, Nuclear Threat Initiative
Issues to be discussed include:
The current level of nuclear risk
The effects of the development of new technologies on the global nuclear diplomacy
The challenges facing the non-proliferation regime from Iran and North Korea
The role of Russia in destabilisation of the non-proliferation regime
The UK’s approach to the Ban Treaty
The UK’s position ahead of the 2020 NPT Review Conference

Image: Parliamentary copyright

MIL-OSI UK News

MIL-OSI UK: Minister for Middle East to give evidence on Yemen

Source: British Parliament News

11 January 2019
The House of Lords International Relations Committee will hold a special evidence session on recent Yemen peace talks and the UK’s response to the humanitarian crisis in the country.

Witnesses
Wednesday 16 January in Committee Room 2, Palace of Westminster
At 10.40am
The Rt Hon Alistair Burt MP, Minister of State for the Middle East, Foreign and Commonwealth Office and Minister of State at the Department for International Development
Possible questions
How is the UK supporting the implementation of the Stockholm Agreement and discussion on the outstanding humanitarian issues?
What are your expectations for the next round of negotiations, and what will be the major issues for discussion?
What is your assessment of the current humanitarian situation in Yemen, and what is the UK doing to meet Yemen’s humanitarian needs?
The former Foreign Secretary, Boris Johnson, told the Committee in January 2017 the when considering international humanitarian law, the UK was “still narrowly on the right side” of the threshold when considering the provision of arms to Saudi Arabia. Does this remain the Government’s view?

Image: PA

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MIL-OSI UK: Lords debates developments in Western Balkans

Source: British House Of Lords News

09 January 2019
Members of the Lords, including a former member of the UN Secretary-General High Level Panel on Threats, Challenges and Change and a former senior special adviser to the Foreign Secretary, will debate developments in the Western Balkans and the threat posed by instability and insecurity in that region, in the House of Lords on Thursday 10 January.

This is a general debate. During debates, members are able to put their experience to good use, discussing current issues and drawing the government’s attention to concerns.
This debate will take place in the Moses Room, a room outside the Lords chamber used to host extra work. Any member can attend and participate, as with debates in the Lords chamber.
The debate was proposed by Baroness Helic (Conservative), former senior special adviser to the Foreign Secretary
Members expected to take part include:
Baroness Anelay of St Johns (Conservative), former minister of state for the Commonwealth and the UN in the Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Lord Browne of Ladyton (Labour), director VERTIC, support organisation for effective verification of international agreements
Lord Hannay of Chiswick (Crossbench), former member of the UN Secretary-General High Level Panel on Threats, Challenges and Change
Earl of Sandwich (Crossbench), adviser to humanitarian aid organisation CARE International
Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon (Conservative), minister of state in the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, will respond on behalf of the government.
Further information
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MIL-OSI UK: FCO Official and nuclear diplomacy experts give evidence to Committee

Source: British Parliament News

17 December 2018
The International Relations Committee takes evidence on rising tensions between nuclear armed states and the fragmenting of existing non-proliferation and arms control agreements.

Witnesses
Wednesday 19 October in Committee Room 4, Palace of Westminster
At 10.40am
Ms Sarah Price, Acting Director for Defence and International Security, Foreign and Commonwealth Office
At 11.40am
Ms Shatabhisha Shetty, Deputy Director, European Leadership Network
Mr Paul Ingram, Executive Director, British American Security Information Council
Possible questions
How do you see the current state of global nuclear diplomacy, and to what extent has it been challenged in recent years?
Ahead of the 2020 Review Conference of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) what are the government’s priorities?
To what extent is the development of new technologies affecting the established non-proliferation and disarmament regimes?
How effectively has the UK responded to challenges to the global nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament regime, including the US withdrawal from the Iran Nuclear Deal?
How has the UK’S approach to nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament developed since the entry into force of the NPT, in particular in recent years?
What recommendations would you make to the Government on how to approach these issues ahead of the 2020 Review Conference?
Further Information
Image: PA

MIL-OSI UK News

MIL-OSI UK: Human Rights in International Agreements inquiry launched

Source: British House of Commons News

13 December 2018
The Joint Committee on Human Rights launches inquiry into whether parliament should set up a specific mechanism to scrutinise international agreements for compliance with human rights and what processes should be followed to ensure adequate scrutiny of compliance with human rights standards in international agreements post-Brexit.

Background
International Agreements contain increasingly important provisions in a modern, globalised world and can have significant impacts on a huge variety of areas. Deals done in such agreements can impact on the human rights of those living in the UK and also the human rights of those living overseas. This could involve justice or home affairs treaties, such as mutual legal cooperation or extradition treaties, or trade deals allowing businesses special access to markets or the export of goods that could be used in human rights violations. All of these agreements have the potential to impact human rights, such as the rights of workers, the right to be free from servitude and forced labour, and the right to privacy of data as it passes across borders.
Send us your views
The Joint Committee on Human Rights seeks written evidence on the best mechanisms to ensure that human rights are protected in the UK’s future international agreements.  In particular we are interested in the following questions:
Should the UK Parliament have better mechanisms for scrutinising the human rights protections contained in international agreements contemplated by the UK?  If yes, what processes, information and analysis might be appropriate? What should the JCHR’s role be?
Should the UK require standard clauses in international agreements to protect human rights?  For example: 

should the UK require a standard exemptions clause such that nothing in the agreement prevents the UK from adopting measures necessary for the protection of the UK’s domestic and international human rights obligations?
should the UK require a standard suspension clause to highlight the importance of human rights in inter-State relations and to provide for potential sanctions if human rights standards slip below a certain threshold?
how should UK international trade rules ensure adequate restrictions continue to apply to the export of equipment that could be used in human rights abuses, such as torture?

The House of Lords Constitution Committee is also inquiring into Parliamentary Scrutiny of treaties more broadly.
Send a submission to the Human Rights Protections in International Agreements inquiry
Submissions should be no more than 1,500 words.  The deadline for submissions is Monday 14 January 2019.
The Committee is likely to take evidence early in the New Year so prompt submission is particularly helpful
Further information
Image: iStockphoto

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MIL-OSI UK: Lords debates reconciliation in British foreign policy

Source: British House Of Lords News

13 December 2018
Members of the Lords, including a member of the Lords International Relations Committee and the Labour spokesperson for international development, will debate the role of reconciliation in British foreign, defence and international development policy, in the House of Lords on Friday 14 December.

This is a general debate. During debates, members are able to put their experience to good use, discussing current issues and drawing the government’s attention to concerns.
The debate was proposed by the Lord Archbishop of Canterbury (Bishops).
Members expected to take part include:
Earl Howe (Conservative), minister of state in the Ministry of Defence, will respond on behalf of the government.
Further information
Image: House of Lords 2018 / Photography by Roger Harris

MIL-OSI UK News

MIL-OSI UK: UN High Representative gives evidence to Committee

Source: British Parliament News

11 December 2018
The International Relations Committee takes evidence on the state of global nuclear diplomacy and the challenges facing the established non-proliferation and disarmament regime.

Witnesses
Wednesday 12 December in Committee Room 4, Palace of Westminster
At 10.40am
Ms Izumi Nakamitsu, Under-Secretary-General for Disarmament Affairs, United Nations
Ioan Tudor, Chief, Weapons of Mass Destruction Branch, United Nations
Possible questions
How would you characterise the state of global nuclear diplomacy today? To what extent are the challenges facing multilateralism generally affecting nuclear diplomacy specifically?
Ahead of the 2020 Review Conference of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) what are the biggest challenges facing the NPT regime?
In your view, how do the NPT and the Treaty on the prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (TPNW) fit together?
What are the prospects for the agreement of a Fissile Material Cutoff Treaty?
To what extent is the developments of new technologies affecting the established non-proliferation regime?
Further information
Image: PA

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