MIL-OSI UK: Lords debates digital techology and young people

Source: British House Of Lords News

16 January 2019
Members of the Lords, including the chair of children’s digital rights charity 5Rights and a vice president of Barnardos, will debate the relationship between the use of digital technology and the health and wellbeing of children and young people, in the House of Lords on Thursday 17 January.

This is a general debate. They normally take place on a Thursday in the chamber. During debates, members are able to put their experience to good use, discussing current issues and drawing the government’s attention to concerns.
The debate was proposed by Baroness Kidron (Crossbench), chair of children’s digital rights charity 5Rights.
Members expected to take part include:
Baroness Benjamin (Liberal Democrat), broadcaster and vice president of Barnardos
Lord Griffiths of Burry Port (Labour), Lords opposition spokesperson for digital, culture, media and sport
Earl of Listowel (Crossbench), trustee of child welfare charity The Michael Sieff Foundation
Lord Lucas (Conservative), vice chair of the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Digital Identity
Lord Ashton of Hyde (Conservative), parliamentary under-secretary in the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, will respond on behalf of the government.
Further information
Image: iStockphoto

MIL-OSI UK News

MIL-OSI UK: Counter-Terrorism and Border Security Bill: Lords third reading

Source: British Parliament News

14 January 2019
The Counter-Terrorism and Border Security Bill has its third reading, a chance to ‘tidy up’ the bill and make changes, in the Lords on Tuesday 15 January.

Members are expected to discuss the definition of a terminally ill person and the government designation of areas outside the UK by way of regulations to be laid before parliament.
Lords report stage day two: Monday 17 December
Members discussed a range of topics including a review of proscribed organisations, the case for national identity numbers and the responsibility of the government to produce reports on individuals detained under new port and border controls.
There was one division (vote) on a proposed amendment (change) to the bill.
The vote concerned the insertion of  new provision which would require the Secretary of State to make arrangements, within six month’s of the Act’s passing, for an independent review on the government’s strategy to prevent vulnerable people being drawn into terrorism.
The provision would require any such report to:
be laid before both Houses of Parliament within 18 months of the Act’s passing
include a statement from the Secretary of State in response to all recommendations made within the review
214 members of Lords voted in favour of the amendment and 196 voted against, and so the change was made.
Third reading, a chance to ‘tidy up’ the bill and make changes, is yet to be scheduled.
Lords report stage day one: Monday 3 December
Members discussed a range of subjects including expression of support for proscribed organisations, reasons for entering or remaining in designated areas and publication of images.
There were two divisions (votes) on proposed changes (amendments) to the bill.
Members considered a change which would make it an offence for a person to express an opinion or belief that ‘supports’ a proscribed organisation, rather than using the broader meaning of  ‘is supportive of’, which could be applied to people beyond those who actually intend any wrong or harm.
93 Members were in favour of this amendment, with 198 against, and so the change was not made.
The next vote was on the addition of a number of situations in which an individual, who goes into or remains in a designated area, would not be committing an offence by that act. Such situations would include providing humanitarian aid, carrying out the work for the United Nations and working as a journalist.
220 members voted in favour of this addition and 191 voted against, and so the change was made.
Lords committee stage day four: Wednesday 14 November
Members discussed retention and protection of journalistic and legally privileged material, declaration of dual passports and access to a solicitor.
Lords committee stage day three: Monday 12 November
Members discussed a range of subjects, including the introduction of national identity numbers, continued participation in the European Arrest Warrant and biometric data.
Lords committee stage day two: Wednesday 31 October
Members discussed subjects including the act of treason in aiding a hostile state or organisation, extended sentences for terrorism offences and notification requirements.
Lords committee stage day one: Monday 29 October
Members discussed subjects including expressions of support for proscribed organisations, publication of images and seizure of articles and the movement of UK citizens in areas designated as having a risk of terrorism.
Lords second reading: Tuesday 9 October
Members discussed the pattern of radicalisation, new offences regarding expressing support for terrorist organisations and overseas travel.
Baroness Williams of Trafford (Conservative), minister of state in the Home Office, responded on behalf of the government.
Counter-Terrorism  and Border Security Bill summary
This bill aims to:
Amend certain terrorism offences for the digital age and to reflect contemporary patterns of radicalisation
Increase the maximum penalty for certain offences, ensuring the punishment better reflects the crime and better prevents re-offending
Manage offenders following their release from custody
Strengthen powers of the police to prevent and investigate terrorist offences
Harden the UK’s defences at the border against hostile state activity
Further information
Image: PA

MIL-OSI UK News

MIL-OSI UK: Senior judges discuss use of forensic science

Source: British Parliament News

13 December 2018
The House of Lords Science and Technology Select Committee question senior judges about the use of forensic science in courts in England and Wales and its contribution to the delivery of justice.

Purpose of session
The Committee will ask the witnesses how judges can ensure that the analysis and interpretation of forensic evidence presented in court has a firm scientific basis. The Committee will also ask whether there are effective channels for the communication of advice on science and technology to the judiciary.
Witnesses
Tuesday 18 December in Committee Room 4A, Palace of Westminster
At 4.25pm
Lord Hughes of Ombersley, former Justice of the Supreme Court
His Honour Judge Wall QC, Circuit Judge
Sir Brian Leveson, President of the Queen’s Bench Division and Head of Criminal Justice
Possible questions
What is the level of understanding of forensic science within the Criminal Justice System amongst lawyers, judges and juries?
When a case that relies on forensic evidence comes before you how do you ensure that any expert witness is sufficient qualified to speak about the subject?
Is enough being done to prepare for the increasing role that digital forensics will have in the Criminal Justice System in the future?
Is there a source of responsive and ongoing independent, balanced and accessible analysis of science and technology in relation to legal issues available to the judiciary?
Further information
Image: Parliamentary copyright

MIL-OSI UK News

MIL-OSI UK: Committee to ask senior judges about use of forensic science

Source: British House Of Lords News

13 December 2018
The House of Lords Science and Technology Select Committee question senior judges about the use of forensic science in courts in England and Wales and its contribution to the delivery of justice.

Purpose of session
The Committee will ask the witnesses how judges can ensure that the analysis and interpretation of forensic evidence presented in court has a firm scientific basis. The Committee will also ask whether there are effective channels for the communication of advice on science and technology to the judiciary.
Witnesses
Tuesday 18 December in Committee Room 4A, Palace of Westminster
At 4.25pm
Lord Hughes of Ombersley, former Justice of the Supreme Court
His Honour Judge Wall QC, Circuit Judge
Sir Brian Leveson, President of the Queen’s Bench Division and Head of Criminal Justice
Possible questions
What is the level of understanding of forensic science within the Criminal Justice System amongst lawyers, judges and juries?
When a case that relies on forensic evidence comes before you how do you ensure that any expert witness is sufficient qualified to speak about the subject?
Is enough being done to prepare for the increasing role that digital forensics will have in the Criminal Justice System in the future?
Is there a source of responsive and ongoing independent, balanced and accessible analysis of science and technology in relation to legal issues available to the judiciary?
Further information
Image: Parliamentary copyright

MIL-OSI UK News