Anzac Day 2019: Gallipoli Commemorations

Source: New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade – Safe Travel

Anzac Day 2019: Gallipoli Commemorations

Anzac Day 2019 commemorations in Gallipoli, Turkey
On Anzac Day 2019, we will commemorate the Anzac landings in Gallipoli. This bulletin should be read in conjunction with our Turkey travel advisory.

Safety and security
The Anzac Day Service on the Gallipoli peninsula is a five hour drive from Istanbul. For this region of Turkey, we advise you to exercise increased caution.

There are a number of areas in south-east Turkey that we advise New Zealanders avoid non-essential travel to, and other areas that we advise New Zealanders do not travel to (along the Syrian border, and the city of Diyarbakir). See our Turkey advisory for more information.

We advise that New Zealanders exercise increased caution elsewhere in Turkey, including in Ankara, Istanbul and on the Gallipoli peninsula, due to the heightened threat of terrorism and the potential for civil unrest. For more information on these advice levels, see our Turkey advisory and our About our advisories page.

Terrorism
Terrorist attacks can take place anywhere and at any time in Turkey. Terrorist groups have conducted deadly attacks in Turkey and continue to threaten further attacks. New Zealanders throughout Turkey are advised to exercise a high degree of vigilance in public places, keep themselves informed of potential risks to safety and security by monitoring the media and other local information sources, and following the instructions of local authorities.

Be security conscious around buildings and sites associated with Turkish government and security forces, as well as landmarks and places known to be frequented by foreigners, such as embassies, tourist locations, shopping malls, entertainment areas, public transport, airports, places of worship and identifiably Western businesses. If you are in an area affected by an attack, you should leave the immediate vicinity as soon as it is safe to do so, follow any instructions given by local authorities and let your family know you are safe and well.

The security environment in Turkey may change between now and Anzac Day. We recommend that New Zealanders travelling to Turkey for the Anzac commemorations regularly monitor SafeTravel and our travel advice, which will be kept under close review in the lead up to the event. 

Attending the services
The 2019 Anzac Day commemorative services at Gallipoli will be held on Wednesday 24 and Thursday 25 April. More information on the services, what to expect at Gallipoli and what to bring, can be found here.

New Zealanders attending the 2019 Anzac Day services at Gallipoli will require an attendance pass. This pass can be obtained by registering on the Overseas Commemorations Website.

Security and crowd management at the commemorations are the responsibility of local security staff. Attendees will be subject to airport-style screening at the entrances to sites, including bag searches. Follow the instructions of security staff at all times.

Local health authorities provide limited medical support at the commemorative sites. Support is mostly designed for medical emergencies. Bring your own first aid kit (e.g. sunscreen, band aids and paracetamol) as these are not provided.

Facilities designed for persons with disabilities or restricted mobility are not generally available in Turkey.  Before organising your trip, contact a travel agent, tour operator or the local tourist authority to find out whether local transport, accommodation and attractions will cater for your needs.

Before you go
All domestic and international passenger flights to and from Istanbul Ataturk Airport were transferred to the new Istanbul Airport as of 7 April 2019. For New Zealanders travelling to Turkey, we recommend that you check your flight details with your airline. See our news feature for more information.

All New Zealanders planning on attending the Gallipoli Anzac Day Commemorative Services are encouraged to:

  • Register your details on the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade’s SafeTravel website so that you are made aware of any changes to our travel advice for Turkey and so that we can contact you and account for your well-being in the event of an emergency; and
  • Ensure you have a comprehensive travel insurance policy in place that includes provision for medical evacuation by air. You also need to check which circumstances and activities are covered and not covered by your insurance policy, as limitations can apply.  Your travel insurer should have a 24/7 emergency number.

Consular assistance at Gallipoli 
Consular staff from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade will be in Turkey over the commemorative period to provide on-the-ground consular assistance required by New Zealanders attending the Gallipoli commemorations. For information on the kind of consular assistance the New Zealand Government can and cannot provide, check out the ‘When Things Go Wrong’ tab on the SafeTravel website.

Throughout this period, New Zealanders requiring consular assistance should contact +90 533 284 08 88.  

Emergency numbers:

  • Firefighting and rescue services: 110
  • Ambulance: 112
  • Criminal issues in major cities: 155 (English speakers not always available)
  • Criminal issues in rural areas: 156 (English speakers rarely available).

Foreigners may also contact the Tourist Police in Istanbul on +90 212 527 4503 during office hours.

Associated Advisories:

See the Turkey travel advisory

The New Zealand Embassy Ankara, Turkey

Street Address Kizkulesi Sokak No.11, Gaziosmanpasa, Ankara, Turkey 
Telephone + 90 312 446 3333 
Fax +90 312 446 3317 
Email newzealandembassyankara@gmail.com 
Website http://www.mfat.govt.nz/turkey 
Hours Mon – Fri 0830 – 1700

Associated Advisories:

Share this page:

MIL OSI

Representations of Islam and Muslims in New Zealand media

Source: Pacific Media Centre

Analysis published with permission of PMC

“Burkinis have been banned in Cannes.: From a Stuff representation.

Pacific Journalism Review

Friday, March 15, 2019

Abstract

In the global media scene, media ownership is controlled by groups with political agendas. Intolerance of ‘the other’, from Islam and migrants to people of colour, show the rise of fundamentally prejudiced groups who relate well to negative media representations of ‘the other’, further fuelling financial support for dominant public voices, at the expense of those silenced by discrimination. Media studies on Islam show negative portrayals in Western media which neglect the Muslim voice. Some reasons include news culture, lack of knowledge about Islam and unawareness of the consequences from such narratives. This article identifies the growing trend of stories in the New Zealand media relating to ‘Islamic terrorism’ and critically analyses a random sampling of five news articles between 2014 and 2016 in terms of the negative, positive and ambivalent news content, both in their use of the written text and visual representations of Islam and Muslims. The tendency to use negative framing is evident with the absence or manipulation of the Muslim voice. Using the Islamic perspective of dialogue and persuasion, the theory of Ta’will, and socio-political rationale, the effects of and motivations for the written and visual news content are discussed. A case is made for a greater understanding of the textual and visual elements and more ethical reporting through intercultural engagement.

MIL OSI

MIL OSI

Tropical Cyclone Idai

Source: New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade – Safe Travel

Tropical Cyclone Idai

On 15 March 2019, tropical cyclone Idai made landfall at the port city of Beira in Mozambique, causing flooding, high winds and mud slides which has left a trail of destruction in Mozambique, Malawi and Zimbabwe.

 

If you are in the affected area or areas potentially affected by the flooding and mudslides you should follow the advice of the local authorities at all times, exercise caution and monitor local media for any developments. Please also keep your family back in New Zealand informed of your well-being.

 

New Zealanders in Mozambique, Malawi and Zimbabwe requiring consular assistance can contact the New Zealand High Commission in South Africa on +27 12 435 9000 or via email at enquiries@nzhc.co.za

Associated Advisories:

Share this page:

Share this page:

Latest News features

MIL OSI

Advice for New Zealanders overseas

Source: New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade – Safe Travel

Advice for New Zealanders overseas

The terrorist attacks in Christchurch on 15 March, which were motivated by extreme right-wing ideology, have attracted global attention and strong international condemnation.  International reactions to those events are difficult to predict and may change at short notice.

New Zealanders travelling overseas should continue to use common sense, exercise caution and be vigilant. They should look out for and report suspicious behaviour, as they would in New Zealand.  New Zealanders should continue to monitor the media and other sources for information about possible new safety or security threats, and follow the advice of local authorities. New Zealanders should also continue to avoid demonstrations and protests, as they can turn violent.

New Zealanders seeking information about specific destinations should read our individual advisories, which are regularly reviewed.

Share this page:

Share this page:

Latest News features

MIL OSI

Media companies on notice over traumatised journalists after landmark Age court decision

Source: Pacific Media Centre

Analysis published with permission of PMC

A landmark ruling by an Australian court is expected to have international consequences for newsrooms, with media companies on notice they face large compensation claims if they fail to take care of journalists who regularly cover traumatic events.

The Victorian County Court accepted the potential for psychological damage on those whose work requires them to report on traumatic events, including violent crimes.

The court ruled on February 22 that an Age journalist be awarded A$180,000 for psychological injury suffered during the decade she worked at the Melbourne-based newspaper, from 2003 to 2013.

READ MORE: New research reveals how Australian journalists are faring four years after redundancy

The journalist, known in court as “YZ” to protect her identity, reported on 32 murders and many more cases as a court reporter. She covered Melbourne’s “gangland wars”, was threatened by one of its notorious figures, and found it increasingly difficult to report on events involving the death of children, such as the case of four-year-old Darcey Freeman who was thrown by her father from West Gate Bridge in 2009.

After complaining that she was “done” with “death and destruction”, the journalist was transferred to the sports desk. But a senior editor later persuaded her, against her wishes, to cover the Supreme Court where she was exposed to detailed, graphic accounts of horrific crimes, including the trials of Donna Fitchett, Robert Farquharson and Darcey Freeman’s father.

The repeated exposure to traumatic events had a serious impact on her mental health. YZ took a voluntary redundancy from the newspaper in 2013.

In her court challenge, the journalist alleged The Age:

  • had no system in place to enable her to deal with the trauma of her work
  • failed to provide support and training in covering traumatic events, including from qualified peers
  • did not intervene when she and others complained
  • transferred her to court reporting after she had complained of being unable to cope with trauma experienced from previous crime reporting.

The Age contested whether the journalist was actually suffering from post-traumatic stress. It argued that even if a peer-support programme had been in place it would not have made a material difference to the journalist’s experience.

Further, The Age denied it knew or should have known there was a foreseeable risk of psychological injury to its journalists and simultaneously argued that the plaintiff knew “by reason of her work she was at high risk of foreseeable injury”.

Judge Chris O’Neill found the journalist’s evidence more compelling than the media company’s, even though the psychological injury she had suffered put her at a disadvantage when being cross-examined in court.

Bruce Shapiro, executive director of the Dart Center for Journalism and Trauma in the United States, says:

This is a historic judgment – the first time in the world, to my knowledge, that a news organisation has been found liable for a reporter’s occupational PTSD.

Media companies need to take PTSD seriously
This is not the first time a journalist has sued over occupational PTSD, as Shapiro calls it, but it is the first time one has succeeded. In 2012, another Australian journalist unsuccessfully sued the same newspaper.

In that earlier case, discussed by a co-author of this article (Ricketson) in Australian Journalism Review, the judge was reluctant to accept either the psychological impact on journalists covering traumatic events or The Age’s tardiness in implementing a trauma-aware newsroom. In stark contrast, the judge in the YZ case readily accepted both these key concepts.

Historically, the idea of journalists suing their employers for occupational PTSD was unheard of. Newsroom culture dictated that journalists did whatever was asked of them, including intrusions on grieving relatives, or “death knocks” as they are known. Doing these was intrinsic to the so-called “school of hard knocks”. Cadet journalists were blooded in the newsroom by their ability to do these tasks.

The academic literature shows that newsroom culture has been a key contributor to the problem of journalists feeling unable to express concerns about covering traumatic events for fear of appearing weak and unsuited to the job.

What is alarming from the evidence provided to Judge O’Neill is the extent to which these attitudes still hold sway in contemporary newsrooms. YZ said that as a crime reporter she worked in a “blokey environment” where the implicit message was “toughen up, princess”.

Duty of care
The YZ case shows The Age had learnt little about its duty of care to journalists from the earlier case it defended. One of its own witnesses, the editorial training manager, gave evidence of his frustration at being unable to persuade management to implement a suitable training and support programme. Judge O’Neill found him a compelling witness.

The Dart Center has a range of tip sheets on its website for self-care and peer support. What is clear from this case is that it’s not just about individual journalists and what they do, but about editors and media executive taking action.

One media organisation that is leading the way is the ABC. The national broadcaster has had a peer-support programme in place for a decade.

Such programmes are vital, not just for individual journalists, but for democracy and civil society. This is because whatever changes have been sweeping through the news media, there is no change in the incidence of disasters, crimes and traumatic events that need to be covered.

News workers need help. And they are beginning to demand it.

Dr Matthew Ricketson is professor of communication at Deakin University . He is also chair of the board of directors of the Dart Centre Asia-Pacific, which is affiliated with the Dart Center for Journalism and Trauma based in the United States. It is a voluntary position. During part of the period covered by the YZ court case he worked as a journalist at The Age.

Dr Alexandra Wake is journalism programme manager at RMIT University. She is also on the Dart Centre Asia Pacific board, and in 2011 was named a Dart Academic Fellow. As part of that process, Alex traveled to Columbia University in New York for training, at Dart’s expense. This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons licence.

MIL OSI

MIL OSI

Are you a New Zealander living in the UK or travelling to the UK?

Source: New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade – Safe Travel

Are you a New Zealander living in the UK or travelling to the UK?

The United Kingdom (UK) is preparing to exit the European Union (EU) on 29 March 2019. We provide the following information for New Zealanders living in or travelling to the UK.

New Zealand citizens who plan to continue living in the UK after it leaves the EU can use the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) website tool to seek guidance on visa status and rights to stay.  Further information can be found through the UK’s Department for Exiting the European Union: https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/department-for-exiting-the-european-union. The UK Government has also published a range of technical notices, which provide advice on how various areas would be handled in the event of a “no deal” outcome.  We encourage you to read these notices, which can be found here.

Key points about Brexit that New Zealanders travelling to or living in the UK might like to know are:

Travelling to and between the UK and the EU
Your ability to travel should not be impacted by Brexit, however it is possible that a “no deal” Brexit may result in longer queues at UK and EU ports of entry.  You should check that your passport has at least six months’ validity prior to entering the UK or EU.  If you have concerns about upcoming travel, you should refer to your airline for details relating to flight information.

New Zealanders who are travelling or living overseas should always have a comprehensive travel insurance policy in place. You should check with your travel insurance provider to make sure that your travel insurance policy will not be affected by Brexit.   

It is possible that some arrangements for EU travel will change after Brexit.  This is particularly relevant if you are a New Zealander who lives in the UK.  Before you travel, you should check if there have been any changes to (for example) your right to medical care in Europe, driver licence requirements within Europe and whether your licence will be sufficient, and your mobile phone bill and roaming charges in Europe.  Further information can be found here:  https://www.gov.uk/prepare-eu-exit

Living and working in the UK
The UK’s exit from the EU should not affect the visa arrangements, New Zealand has with the UK. The Youth Mobility Scheme visa will still be available to New Zealand citizens.

If you have specific visa enquiries, or you are concerned about an application for a visa to the UK being delayed, you should refer to the UK authorities.

The New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade cannot provide definitive advice on the UK’s requirements for entry to or exit from the UK.  For this reason we recommend that travellers consult in advance with their travel agent, airline or with the UK authorities directly. 

If you have business interests in the UK, there is material available on the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade and New Zealand Trade and Enterprise websites below:

 Advice relating to the EU
For further specific advice relating to implications for issues such as travel, residency, education and employment in the EU, please see the European Commission’s Preparedness Notices: https://ec.europa.eu/info/brexit/brexit-preparedness_en

Associated Advisories:

Share this page:

MIL OSI

Bearing Witness 2017: Year 2 of a Pacific climate change storytelling project

Source: Pacific Media Centre

Analysis published with permission of PMC

David Robie, Pacific Media Centre

Monday, February 25, 2019

Abstract

In 2016, the Pacific Media Centre responded to the devastation and tragedy wrought in Fiji by Severe Tropical Cyclone Winston by initiating the Bearing Witness journalism project and dispatching two postgraduate students to Viti Levu to document and report on the impact of climate change (Robie & Chand, 2017). This was followed up in 2017 in a second phase of what was hoped would become a five-year mission and expanded in future years to include other parts of the Asia-Pacific region. This project is timely, given the new 10-year Strategic Plan 2017-2026 launched by the Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP) in March and the co-hosting by Fiji of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP23) climate change conference in Bonn, Germany, during November. The students dispatched in 2017 on the  ‘bearing witness’ journalism experiential assignment to work in collaboration with the Pacific Centre for the Environment and Sustainable Development (PaCE-SD) and the Regional Journalism Programme at the University of the South Pacific included a report about the relocation of a remote inland village of Tukuraki. They won the 2017 media and trauma prize of the Asia-Pacific Dart Centre, an agency affiliated with the Columbia School of Journalism. This article is a case study assessing the progress with this second year of the journalism project and exploring the strategic initiatives under way for more nuanced and constructive Asia-Pacific media storytelling in response to climate change.

Bearing Witness 2016

MIL OSI

MIL OSI

Journalism at USP: A thirty-year journey

Source: Pacific Media Centre

Analysis published with permission of PMC

Heading on the book chapter on University of the South Pacific’s 50-year history.

Shailendra Singh

Friday, February 22, 2019

Abstract

The Univerasity of the South Pacific’s 50th anniversary marks 30 years of existence for its regional journalism programme. In an eventful journey, the programme weathered military coups, overcame financial hardships and shrugged off academic snobbery to get this far. The programme started in Suva in 1988, with Com- monwealth funding, and a handful of students to its name. It has produced over 200 graduates serving the Pacific and beyond in various media and communication roles. USP journalism graduates have produced award-winning journalism, started their own media companies and localised various positions at regional organisations once reserved for expatriates.

See also Robie, D. (2004). Mekim Nius: South Pacific media, politics and education. Suva: University of the South Pacific Book Centre.

MIL OSI

MIL OSI

Pacific Media Centre Annual Review 2018

Source: Pacific Media Centre

Analysis published with permission of PMC

Pacific Media Centre

ISBN/code: ISSN 2624-3768

Publication date: Wednesday, February 20, 2019

Publisher: Pacific Media Centre

PACIFIC MEDIA CENTRE ANNUAL REVIEW 2018
The Pacific Media Centre (PMC) became the only university-based communications and media publishing unit to be included in Radio New Zealand’s highly praised public outreach programme in recognition of its specialised Pacific knowledge, research and media content production.

It was also the only NZ programme invited to join the Journalism Research and Education Association (JERAA) of Australia.

This was launched during 2018: junctionjournalism.com

Read more

MIL OSI

MIL OSI

Toktok No 38 / Summer 2019

Source: Pacific Media Centre

Analysis published with permission of PMC

Pacific Media Centre

ISBN/code: ISSN 1175-0472

Publication date: Monday, February 18, 2019

Publisher: Pacific Media Centre

‘BE COURAGEOUS IN YOUR QUEST FOR TRUTH,’ PMC DIRECTOR TELLS PACIFIC JOURNALISM GRADUATES

Pacific journalism academic Professor David Robie believes the media play a critical role in exposing abuses of power in a world increasingly hostile towards journalists.

However, journalists in the Pacific are frequently “persecuted by smallminded politicians with scant regard for the role of the media,” he says.

Speaking at the 18th University of the South Pacific Journalism Student Awards ceremony at Laucala campus in Suva, Fiji, last October, Dr Robie said despite the growing global dangers surrounding the profession, journalism was critically important for democracy.

Dr Robie said that while such “ghastly fates” for journalists – such as the extrajudicial killing of Saudi dissident writer Jamal Khashoggi in Turkey earlier that month – may seem remote in the Pacific, there were plenty of attacks on media freedom to contend with, while trolls in the region and state threats to internet freedom were “also rife”.

Read more

Plus:

+ New communication award created for Pasifika women

+ Coverage of New Caledonia/Kanaky referendum, November 2018

+ Wansolwara and AUT coverage of Fiji elections, November 2018
 

MIL OSI

MIL OSI