Proposal to list medical devices supplied by Becton Dickinson Limited

Source: Pharmac

What we’re proposing

PHARMAC is seeking feedback on a proposal to list a range of needles and syringes in Part III of Section H of the Pharmaceutical Schedule from 1 June 2019, through a non-exclusive provisional agreement with Becton Dickinson Limited (“BD”).

Consultation closes at 4pm on Wednesday, 1 May 2019 and feedback can be emailed to chloe.dimock@pharmac.govt.nz.

What would the effect be?

From 1 June 2019, BD’s range of needles and syringes products would be listed under the proposed national agreement for all DHBs to purchase under, subject to consultation and approval by PHARMAC’s Board or delegate (“Agreement”).

This Agreement would not be for sole supply, with DHBs continuing to be able to purchase other suppliers’ brands of needles and syringes. The Agreement includes currently used products and products that are new to DHBs and their funded services and would provide a greater range of products for clinical staff to choose from.

The Agreement would supersede any existing DHB contracts with BD for the devices included in the Agreement. Any medical device listed in the Agreement and purchased by a DHB would be at the price, terms and conditions stated in the Agreement, effective from the date of listing on the Pharmaceutical Schedule.

As part of the Agreement, BD would provide educational services that would be tailored to the individual needs of the DHB, in formats and at times as required by the DHB.

Pricing for the devices in the Agreement, subject to any prior termination of the Agreement, would not be increased without prior consultation and approval by PHARMAC.

Who we think will be interested


About the medical devices

Needles and syringes

Needles and syringes are medical devices predominantly used to inject fluids (such as medicines) into or withdraw fluids from the body (such as blood). Syringes are also used for a variety of other purposes such as for flushing, irrigating and are also used with medical gases and air. These medical devices are used across a wide range of clinical settings.

Included in this proposal are conventional hypodermic needles, syringes, needles and syringes with safety feature, insulin syringes, lancets and a number of specialised needles and syringes used in anaesthesia procedures.


Why we’re proposing this

In 2017 PHARMAC issued a Request for Proposals (“RFP”) for needles and syringes.

The RFP was for non-exclusive national agreements for listing in the Pharmaceutical Schedule.

PHARMAC has been working with suppliers to seek provisional agreements and this proposal is the latest to arise from this process. This is the final proposal eventuating from the 2017 Needles and Syringes RFP that we are consulting on.

Details about our proposal

PHARMAC has entered into a provisional Agreement with BD for a range of needles and syringes. Pricing has been made available to appropriate DHB personnel.

The proposal would result in Pharmaceutical Schedule listings for 177 needle and syringe products.

Brand

  • BD
  • BD AutoShield Duo
  • BD Eclipse
  • BD Epilor
  • BD Integra      
  • BD Micro-Fine+
  • BD Microtainer
  • BD SafetyGlide
  • BD Ultra-Fine
  • BD Yale

To provide feedback

Send us an email: chloe.dimock@pharmac.govt.nz by 4 pm on Wednesday 1 May 2019.

All feedback received before the closing date will be considered by PHARMAC’s Board (or its delegate) prior to making a decision on this proposal.

Feedback we receive is subject to the Official Information Act 1982 (OIA) and we will consider any request to have information withheld in accordance with our obligations under the OIA. Anyone providing feedback, whether on their own account or on behalf of an organisation, and whether in a personal or professional capacity, should be aware that the content of their feedback and their identity may need to be disclosed in response to an OIA request.

We are not able to treat any part of your feedback as confidential unless you specifically request that we do, and then only to the extent permissible under the OIA and other relevant laws and requirements. If you would like us to withhold any commercially sensitive, confidential proprietary, or personal information included in your submission, please clearly state this in your submission and identify the relevant sections of your submission that you would like it withheld. PHARMAC will give due consideration to any such request.

Last updated: 8 April 2019

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Groundwater central to the country’s future

Source: ESR

Groundwater is central to the future of the country’s freshwater and waterways, says ESR’s chief scientist.

Brett Cowan says the country’s top earners such as tourism, dairy and marine industries are all underpinned by and dependent on water.                

“The cost of not making groundwater a priority is enormous; polluted and dead waterways,” he says.

Groundwater is the enormous collection of water in the pores or cracks in sands, gravel and rocks which flows into our springs, rivers and lakes and is essential for the environment, communities and agricultural productivity.

“For all that, scientists still know relatively little about groundwater, particularly about how it is being affected by increasing demand, pollution and climate change. It’s vital that we build up our scientific knowledge to protect groundwater now and for future generations.”

 The leader of ESR’s groundwater science team, Murray Close, says as the government embarks on huge water reforms, it is critical that groundwater takes its central place, particularly in the face of new challenges such as climate change and emerging organic contaminants such as pesticides.

The health of groundwater, which 40 per cent of New Zealanders rely on for drinking water, is crucial to the quality of surface water.

He and Dr Cowan were commenting following a conference in Christchurch, which, for the first time, brought together about 80 people from all around the country to tackle the management and research of groundwater.

Murray Close says generally groundwater is “out of sight, out of mind”, and only noticed when something goes wrong, such as the widespread illness linked to a contaminated bore two years ago in Havelock North which affected 5,000 New Zealanders.

He says today’s conference was valuable because it is helping to build a broader framework of people working on groundwater, with hopefully a national agenda for what is an overlooked, but valuable resource.

“There needs to be a coherent voice on groundwater because it is so important to the health and economy of the country.”

 “There are 200 major aquifers in the country – we only have geological models for 30, so there’s a lot more we need to know.”

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Measles – not what you want for Easter

Source: ESR

      

          

 So far this year there have been 67 cases of measles reported in New Zealand, with most cases linked to outbreaks in Canterbury and the Auckland Region over recent weeks.

In addition to the outbreaks in New Zealand, there have been measles outbreaks reported recently in other countries including the USA, the Philippines and parts of Europe.

In New Zealand measles outbreaks start when measles is brought into the country following international travel.  The virus then spreads to others in the community because our vaccination rates are not high enough to prevent disease spread.

ESR, which tracks all notifiable diseases on behalf of the Ministry of Health, says that with people travelling around the country and around the world over Easter and the school holidays there is an increased risk of cases spreading further around the country and of further measles cases being imported.

ESR Group Leader, Intelligence, Dr Lisa Oakley says people should be mindful of the risks of measles.

“They should also think about the importance of immunisation and of the possibility that they could be exposed to measles, especially if they are travelling, attending events, holiday programmes, camps, or have friends and family travelling to visit them,” Dr Oakley says.  

Measles is a serious and highly infectious disease and immunisation is the best protection to stop the spread of getting measles. For the best protection, people need to have two MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) vaccinations. The MMR is available from your family practice and you should ask if you are eligible for a free vaccination.

Anyone who suspects they may have measles should avoid contact with other people, especially those who aren’t fully immunised, and should phone their GP or call Healthline on 0800 611 116 for advice. It is important to call first because measles is highly infectious, and people with measles can infect others in the waiting room.

Further information including current case numbers is available here: https://surv.esr.cri.nz/surveillance/WeeklyMeaslesRpt.php (external link)

 

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Proposal to list endomechanical and electrosurgical medical devices

Source: Pharmac

What we’re proposing

PHARMAC is seeking feedback on a proposal to list a range of Endomechanical and Electrosurgical Medical Devices on Section H Part III of the Pharmaceutical Schedule from 1 June 2019 through a listing agreement with Ortho Medics Limited (“Ortho Medics”).

Consultation closes at 5pm on Friday, 26 April 2019 and feedback can be emailed to maree.hodgson@pharmac.govt.nz

What would the effect be?

From 1 June 2019, Ortho Medics’ range of Endomechanical and Electrosurgical Products would be listed under the proposed national agreement for all DHBs to purchase under, subject to consultation and approval by PHARMAC’s Board or delegate (“Agreement”).

The Agreement would not be for sole supply, with DHBs continuing to be able to purchase other suppliers’ brands of Endomechanical and Electrosurgical products.

The Agreement would supersede any existing DHB contracts with Ortho Medics for the Endomechanical and Electrosurgical products listed in the Agreement. Any Endomechanical and Electrosurgical products listed in the Agreement and purchased by a DHB would be at the price, terms and conditions stated in the Agreement, effective from the date of listing on the Pharmaceutical Schedule.

As part of the Agreement Ortho Medics would provide training and education that would be tailored to meet the needs of individual DHB Hospitals.

About Endomechanical and Electrosurgical Medical Devices

Endomechanical and electrosurgical medical devices are used in a vast range of surgical specialties and procedures. Many have been specifically designed to be used for minimally invasive surgical techniques whilst others are only used in open surgery procedures. Some require power sources or other equipment to perform their function.

The endomechanical and electrosurgical medical devices category encompasses the product ranges of endomechanical instruments, electrosurgical instruments, energy platforms and their associated consumable products. This covers both disposable and re-usable options, as well as the portable power sources or other equipment that specific instruments may require to be functional.

Why we’re proposing this

In 2018, PHARMAC released a Request for Proposals for endomechanical instruments, electrosurgical instruments, energy platforms and consumable products (“Endomechanical and Electrosurgical Products”). We have been working with suppliers in order to seek provisional agreements, and this is the latest agreement to be negotiated with a proposed listing date of 1 June.

We expect to consult on further provisional agreements, with other suppliers, over the next few months.

Last updated: 5 April 2019

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NIWA’s Hotspot Watch for 4 April 2019

Source: NIWA – National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research

A weekly update describing soil moisture across the country to help assess whether severely to extremely dry conditions are occurring or imminent.  Regions experiencing these soil moisture deficits are deemed “hotspots”.  Persistent hotspot regions have the potential to develop into drought.

Facts: Soil Moisture

Across the North Island, soil moisture levels increased substantially in many areas during the past week, while only a couple of localised areas experienced small soil moisture decreases. The most significant increases were observed in parts of Northland, Auckland, Waikato, eastern Bay of Plenty, Gisborne, and Taranaki. Meanwhile, small soil moisture decreases occurred in western Northland and coastal Wairarapa. The driest soils across the North Island compared to normal for this time of the year are found in western Northland and coastal Wairarapa, while the wettest soils for this time of the year are located in eastern Bay of Plenty and southern Taranaki.

Hotspot coverage in the North Island decreased substantially in the past week due to many areas receiving moderate to heavy rainfall. However, hotspots remain in place across western Northland and Aupouri Peninsula, a small portion of central Waikato, southern Manawatu-Whanganui, and much of Wairarapa and southern Hawke’s Bay.

In the South Island, soil moisture levels generally did not change significantly in the past week. Far northern areas saw some additional soil moisture increases, while the rest of the South Island generally observed minor soil moisture decreases. This decrease was most notable in eastern areas from northern Canterbury to Otago. The driest soils across the South Island compared to normal for this time of the year are found in lower Southland, while the wettest soils for this time of the year are found in the Marlborough Sounds area.

South Island hotspots are currently found in a disjointed line down the eastern coast from northern Canterbury to the Clutha District, including much of Banks Peninsula.

Outlook and Soil Moisture

In the North Island, rainfall amounts through Friday (5 April) will generally be light, although isolated moderate amounts will be possible in Northland due to shower activity. During the upcoming weekend, weak low pressure forming near or just east of the North Island will bring moderate rainfall to eastern areas that may last into early next week. Depending on the location of this low pressure, moderate rainfall could also affect the upper North Island this weekend. Drier weather will likely return to the North Island by Tuesday and Wednesday (9-10 April). Total rainfall amounts in the next week could reach 30-50 mm from Gisborne to Wellington-Wairarapa, with localised amounts up to 30 mm in the upper North Island. Elsewhere, amounts of 20 mm or less are expected.

Due to the anticipated rainfall in the next week, soil moisture improvements would be expected along the east coast, likely weakening the hotspots present there. Should moderate rainfall also occur in the upper North Island, some improvements may also be found there. Meanwhile, western areas may see slight soil moisture decreases in the next week.

In the South Island, a front moving north today and on Friday (5 April) will produce generally 5-15 mm for many areas, and perhaps a bit more in central and northern Canterbury. During the upcoming weekend, low pressure near the North Island could bring more moderate rain to northern Canterbury and Marlborough, while other areas remain mostly dry. By Wednesday (10 April), another front could bring moderate rain to the West Coast and another 5-15 mm to Southland and Otago.

Potential moderate rainfall amounts across Marlborough and northern Canterbury could help weaken or eliminate hotspots in those areas, although not much change in the soil moisture situation is expected in southern Canterbury in the next week. Some improvements could also be found across Southland, while soils may begin to dry in Nelson and nearby parts of Tasman.

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Background:

Hotspot Watch: a weekly advisory service for New Zealand media. It provides soil moisture and precipitation measurements around the country to help assess whether extremely dry conditions are imminent. 

Soil moisture deficit:  the amount of water needed to bring the soil moisture content back to field capacity, which is the maximum amount of water the soil can hold.

Soil moisture anomaly:  the difference between the historical normal soil moisture deficit (or surplus) for a given time of year and actual soil moisture deficits.

Definitions: “Extremely” and “severely” dry soils are based on a combination of the current soil moisture status and the difference from normal soil moisture (see soil moisture maps at https://www.niwa.co.nz/climate/nz-drought-monitor/droughtindicatormaps)

Hotspot: A hotspot is declared if soils are “severely drier than normal” which occurs when Soil Moisture Deficit (SMD) is less than -110 mm AND the Soil Moisture Anomaly is less than -20 mm.

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ESR says groundwater critical to large number of drinking supplies

Source: ESR

                                 

ESR leading water scientist Murray Close says the country’s groundwater needs urgent attention.

An inaugural conference on groundwater is being held in Christchurch tomorrow (Friday April 5 – see below for details), in a bid to improve understanding and information about a resource which 40 per cent of people in New Zealand rely on for their drinking water supplies.

ESR leading water scientist Murray Close says the country’s groundwater needs urgent attention.

Murray Close says the health of groundwater is crucial to the quality of surface water.

 Groundwater is made up of water in the pores or cracks in sands, gravel and rocks and is essential for the environment, communities and agricultural productivity.

 “While our rivers and the state of their health are rightly regarded as important taonga, little attention is given to the groundwater that sustains the flows in most of our rivers and streams.”

 He says most of the time groundwater is out of sight, out of mind.

 “When we do notice it, it’s when something goes wrong, such as the widespread illness linked to a contaminated bore that took place two years ago in Havelock North,” he says.

 With more than five thousand people affected, the contamination of water supplies in Havelock North was regarded as one of the worst public health outbreaks in the western world.

 “For all that, scientists still know relatively little about groundwater, particularly about how it might be affected by increasing demand, pollution and climate change. It’s vital that we build up our scientific knowledge to protect groundwater now and for future generations.”

 The government has introduced two major water initiatives, the Three Waters Review and the Essential Freshwater programme.

 A report on the Three Waters Review released late last year, said in many parts of the country, communities could not be certain that drinking water is safe.

 It also said the events that led to the Havelock North contamination, have demonstrated that the existing system does not adequately safeguard against the

risk of catastrophic contamination incidences, or drive improving compliance with the drinking water standards.

 “The Inquiry into Havelock North Drinking Water observed there is little understanding amongst the New Zealand public about the large numbers of people who become ill every year by consuming unsafe drinking water,” the report said.

 Murray Close says as the government embarks on huge water reforms, it is critical that groundwater is not forgotten, particularly in the face of new challenges such as climate change and emerging organic contaminants.

 Conference information

 GroundsWell 2019: Symposium on Groundwater Management and Research

 WHEN: Friday, April 5, 2019 from 9:30am – 4:30pm

 WHERE:  University of Canterbury Students’ Association’s Event Centre, 90 Illam Road, Christchurch 

 WHO: Keynote speakers include Ken Taylor, Director, Our Land and Water National Science Challenge, Tina Porou, Poipoi Limited, Tim Davie, Chief Scientist, Environment Canterbury, Graham Sevicke-Jones, Manaaki Whenua Landcare Research

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NZIER board appointments

Source: New Zealand Institute of Economic Research

04 April 2019

We are pleased to announce that Dr Dianne McCarthy, CRSNZ CNZM has been appointed as Chair of the NZIER board from 1 April 2019.

We also welcome Grant Pryde to the board. Grant has been appointed to fill the vacancy left by Mr Walls and will be available for re-election at NZIER’s AGM in September 2019.

Dr Dianne McCarthy was appointed to the role of Chair after the resignation of Mr Michael Walls, who served as a director of NZIER from 1993-1998 and as Chair from 1998-2019.

“I am honoured to take on this role” said Dianne.  “NZIER has a proud tradition as the premier centre of applied economic research in New Zealand, and together with my fellow board members I look forward to enhancing this tradition.  I wish  to pay tribute to my predecessor, Michael Walls, for his astute stewardship  of the board over a long period of time”.

Dr Dianne McCarthy, CRSNZ CSNM

Dianne has extensive experience in a number of senior management and governance roles in the tertiary education, science and health sectors. She holds a BA BSc MSc (Hons) and PhD from the University of Auckland.

The former CEO of the Royal Society of New Zealand, she is now a Director of the Cawthron Institute, a member of the governance boards of the Dodd-Walls Centre for Photonic and Quantum Technologies, the Healthier Lives National Science Challenge, and is Chair of the Ageing Well National Science Challenge. She is a Trustee of the Malaghan Institute of Medical Research and the Hearing Research Foundation (NZ).

She was made an Officer of the New Zealand Order of Merit for her services to Education in 2008, a Companion of the Royal Society of New Zealand for her services to Science in 2015, and a Companion of the New Zealand Order of Merit for her services to science, business and women in 2016.

Dianne is a member of NZIER’s Remuneration and Audit Committees.

Grant Pryde

Grant is the Director of Ichor Leadership Search, a Wellington-based executive search firm that has a portfolio of clients across the public, private and not-for-profit sectors in New Zealand. Well-known for delivering advice that works to enhance organisational success, Grant’s particular expertise is in leading national and international search assignments and completing complex leadership appointments.

With over 30 years’ experience in executive search, Grant has developed long-standing client relationships advising Boards, Chief Executives and senior leaders. His consulting career began with an international search firm, which he became a Director of in 1991. He then joined an Auckland-based firm where he conducted international searches predominantly in the professional services, information technology and government sectors. Commencing his career in human resources and training and development, Grant moved to the information technology industry, where he held several national management positions before transitioning into management consulting.

Grant holds a Bachelor of Education from the University of Canterbury, and a Diploma in Business Studies from Massey University. He is a member of the Institute of Directors.

Grant chairs NZIER’s Remuneration Committee.

For further information please contact: Jessica Matthewson, Board Secretary, 021 510114

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New Zealand Colony Loss Survey shows ongoing trend in overall honey bee colony loss

Source: Landcare Research

A report on the New Zealand Colony Loss Survey for 2018 has been released highlighting an increase in colony losses in most regions throughout New Zealand, with the Upper North Island having the highest colony loss rates.

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) has today published the report, revealing beekeepers have reported a higher hive loss rate than previous years in four out of the six broad areas of the country.

Manaaki Whenua – Landcare Research researchers conducted the annual online survey on behalf of the beekeeping industry and MPI. More than 3,600 registered beekeepers (47% of NZ beekeepers) participated in the survey, providing information about the health of their bees and relevant management practices.

This year’s results estimate the national-level overall loss rates for winter 2018 at 10.2%, up from 2016 (9.7%) and 2015 (8.4%), but statistically indistinguishable from 2017 (9.6%). However, further analysis demonstrates a positive time trend in winter losses at the national level.

The highest colony loss rates occurred in the Upper North Island (12.8%) and Middle South Island (11.4%), while the lowest were registered in the Lower North Island (8.1%).

Trend analysis reveals that overall loss rates have increased since 2016 in the Upper North Island and across the South Island, while decreasing in the Middle North Island and Lower North Island.

Average loss rates were significantly higher for non-commercial beekeepers than for semi-commercial and commercial beekeepers.

Leading causes of colony losses include queen problems (35.5%), suspected varroa and related complications (19.5%), suspected starvation (12.1%), and wasps (12.1%).

Most commonly, queen problems were attributed to drone-laying queens and queen failure – but both of these issues were more pronounced among older rather than younger queens.

The Lower South Island reported less formal monitoring of varroa than other regions and the report showed that, among beekeepers who treat varroa, Amitraz and Flumetrin are the most common treatments by a wide margin.

The Colony Loss survey has been conducted annually since 2015 and the questionnaire is based on the international COLOSS survey, but has been adapted to include topics of specific interest to New Zealand beekeepers.

Full survey results: www.landcareresearch.co.nz/bee-health

Full report: www.mpi.govt.nz/document-vault/16711

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March temperatures more evidence of a warming climate

Source: NIWA – National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research

If you thought summer lasted until the very last day of March, you’d be right.

NIWA today released its March Climate Summary which confirms temperatures during the first month of autumn were at record highs in many places.

New Zealand climate – months (per year) colder or warmer than normal

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Officially, this March was the second equal hottest on record, tying with March 1999 and just behind March 1968. According to NIWA’s long-term temperature record the Seven Station Series, last month’s temperature was 1.89ᵒC above average.

The first three months of this year have been the fourth warmest start to the year since records began in 1909.

NIWA principal scientist climate Dr Brett Mullan says the high March temperatures were consistent with our warming climate and when seen in context with other warm months a clear trend was evident.

NIWA climatologists use averages spanning a 30-year period from 1981 to 2010 as the basis of their calculations.

“There were six years before 1930 which did not have a single month in the year warmer than the 1981-2010 average. But in 1998 and 2013 11 out of 12 months were warmer than normal.”

Dr Mullan also says that of the past 100 months from December 2010 to March 2019, 70 were warmer than average and 30 colder than average.

“If New Zealand had maintained the climate it had from 1981 to 2010, we would have expected a 50:50 split. This is a huge divergence.”

So far this year, each month has been warmer than normal.

“The increasing frequency of warm months versus cold months is clear evidence of a warming climate. Greenhouse gas increases are the driving factor behind the progressive warming for New Zealand and the globe,” Dr Mullan said.

“We can expect high temperature records to be broken with increasing frequency over the coming years.”

New Zealand’s six main centres all recorded well above average March temperatures with Dunedin experiencing its warmest March on record. The highest temperature of the month was 32.4ᵒC at Waipara on March 5.

Rainfall was below normal (50-79% of normal) or well below normal (<50% of normal) for five of the six main centres.</p>

From Cape Reinga to the bottom of the South Island, record mean air temperatures were reached last month. Also of note was Ranfurly with a mean maximum temperature during March of 23.4°C, which is 4.0°C warmer than average and the highest since records began there in 1897. 

Warmer than average sea surface temperatures persisted throughout March and marine heatwave conditions continued in the Tasman Sea and in parts of New Zealand’s coastal waters.

Meanwhile, Australia has just experienced its hottest March on record, and its hottest first quarter of the year ever recorded.

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Proposal to list ostomy products supplied by New Zealand Medical & Scientific Limited

Source: Pharmac

What we’re proposing

PHARMAC is seeking feedback on a proposal to list a range of ostomy products in Part III of Section H of the Pharmaceutical Schedule from 1 June 2019, though a listing agreement with New Zealand Limited Medical & Scientific Limited (“NZMS”).

Consultation closes at 4pm on Monday, 29 April 2019 and feedback can be emailed to josh.wiles@pharmac.govt.nz.

What would the effect be?

From 1 June 2019, NZMS’ range of ostomy products would be listed under a national agreement for all DHBs to purchase under, subject to consultation and approval by PHARMAC’s Board or delegate (“Agreement”).

The Agreement would not be for sole supply, with DHBs continuing to be able to purchase other suppliers’ brands of ostomy products.

The Agreement would supersede any existing DHB contracts with NZMS for the ostomy products included in the Agreement.  Any ostomy products listed in the Agreement and purchased by the DHB would be at the price, and the terms and conditions stated in the Agreement, effective from the date of listing on the Pharmaceutical Schedule.

As part of the Agreement, NZMS would provide training and education that would be tailored to the needs of the individuals DHBs.

Who we think will be interested

  • Suppliers and Wholesalers
  • DHB Staff
    • stoma nurses
    • clinical staff in a range of inpatient, outpatient and community settings where ostomy products are used
    • procurement and supply chain personnel
  • Users of ostomy products provided by DHBs

About ostomy products

Ostomy products are used in hospital and community settings, from short to long-term use. 

Ostomy Products include one and two-piece pouching systems to manage stoma drainage, for example colostomy or urostomy drainage, as well as a range of skin protection and other associated products.


Details about our proposal

PHARMAC has entered into a provisional Agreement with NZMS for a range of ostomy products.  Pricing and a full product list have been made available to appropriate DHB personnel.

This proposal would result in listing 14 ostomy products on the Pharmaceutical Schedule.

The brands included in the Agreement are:

  • Medicina Washout set
  • ACELock
  • Ace Stopper

To provide feedback

Send us an email: josh.wiles@pharmac.govt.nz by 4pm on Monday, 29 April 2019.

All feedback received before the closing date will be considered by PHARMAC’s Board (or its delegate) prior to making a decision on this proposal.

Feedback we receive is subject to the Official Information Act 1982 (OIA) and we will consider any request to have information withheld in accordance with our obligations under the OIA. Anyone providing feedback, whether on their own account or on behalf of an organisation, and whether in a personal or professional capacity, should be aware that the content of their feedback and their identity may need to be disclosed in response to an OIA request.

We are not able to treat any part of your feedback as confidential unless you specifically request that we do, and then only to the extent permissible under the OIA and other relevant laws and requirements. If you would like us to withhold any commercially sensitive, confidential proprietary, or personal information included in your submission, please clearly state this in your submission and identify the relevant sections of your submission that you would like it withheld. PHARMAC will give due consideration to any such request.

Last updated: 3 April 2019

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