Paulo follows in his granddad’s footsteps

Source: Eastern Institute of Technology – Tairāwhiti

8 mins ago

Paulo Tonga always wanted to become a builder. “My grandad owned a joinery factory and he was my role model. I always wanted to be like him,” says Paulo.

The 19-year-old is the fourth of seven children. His father is from Tonga and his mother from Tokelau. The family travelled a fair bit before settling in New Zealand. When Paulo was two years old, the family relocated from Australia to Auckland. Six years later they moved to Napier.

After he finished school at William Colenso College, he decided to turn his passion for carpentry into something for life.

“I enrolled at EIT because I knew that the courses would be hands-on.” The NZ Certificate in Construction Trade Skills (Carpentry) was exactly what he was looking for.

While studying at EIT, Paulo worked part-time at McDonalds to support his family. “I often worked weekends and extra hours to earn more money,” he says.

Lee Kershaw remembers Paulo’s outstanding can-do-attitude. Lee is coordinating the government funded Te Ara o Tākitimu Scholarship which supports Māori and Pasifika people into trade training programmes. These include cookery, hospitality, primary industries, hairdressing, health and commercial driving too. Paulo had been one of the recipients.

”We focus on the student’s transition from pre-trade training into the workforce,” explains Lee. Lee and his team are keen to raise aspirations in people and empower them. The scholarship covers all fees and gives the student access to financial learning support, pastoral care and a work broker.

Paulo remembers the passion of his tutors willing to pass on their knowledge. “They were so professional and engaging.” November last year, Paulo completed his certificate and was hired as an apprentice at Tim’s Construction.

“One of the fellow students knew the boss and he put my name forward.” Also, interestingly enough, his foreman, Freddy Jackson had completed the same programme at EIT ten years ago.

“While renovating old houses I learn something new every day. It’s amazing to see that I can create something new, that I build a house where once there was just a lot of green grass or rubble.”

At the end of the year Paulo and his uncle will travel together to Tokelau. Being such a remote island, it will take days to get there. Tokelau however, is where Paulo is planning to make his dream come true, one for his family. “One day I will build a house for my mum there to retire,” says Paulo.

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Paulo follows in his granddad’s footsteps

Source: Eastern Institute of Technology – Tairāwhiti

8 mins ago

Paulo Tonga always wanted to become a builder. “My grandad owned a joinery factory and he was my role model. I always wanted to be like him,” says Paulo.

The 19-year-old is the fourth of seven children. His father is from Tonga and his mother from Tokelau. The family travelled a fair bit before settling in New Zealand. When Paulo was two years old, the family relocated from Australia to Auckland. Six years later they moved to Napier.

After he finished school at William Colenso College, he decided to turn his passion for carpentry into something for life.

“I enrolled at EIT because I knew that the courses would be hands-on.” The NZ Certificate in Construction Trade Skills (Carpentry) was exactly what he was looking for.

While studying at EIT, Paulo worked part-time at McDonalds to support his family. “I often worked weekends and extra hours to earn more money,” he says.

Lee Kershaw remembers Paulo’s outstanding can-do-attitude. Lee is coordinating the government funded Te Ara o Tākitimu Scholarship which supports Māori and Pasifika people into trade training programmes. These include cookery, hospitality, primary industries, hairdressing, health and commercial driving too. Paulo had been one of the recipients.

”We focus on the student’s transition from pre-trade training into the workforce,” explains Lee. Lee and his team are keen to raise aspirations in people and empower them. The scholarship covers all fees and gives the student access to financial learning support, pastoral care and a work broker.

Paulo remembers the passion of his tutors willing to pass on their knowledge. “They were so professional and engaging.” November last year, Paulo completed his certificate and was hired as an apprentice at Tim’s Construction.

“One of the fellow students knew the boss and he put my name forward.” Also, interestingly enough, his foreman, Freddy Jackson had completed the same programme at EIT ten years ago.

“While renovating old houses I learn something new every day. It’s amazing to see that I can create something new, that I build a house where once there was just a lot of green grass or rubble.”

At the end of the year Paulo and his uncle will travel together to Tokelau. Being such a remote island, it will take days to get there. Tokelau however, is where Paulo is planning to make his dream come true, one for his family. “One day I will build a house for my mum there to retire,” says Paulo.

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Services Pathway programme fully subscribed – next intake July

Source: Eastern Institute of Technology – Tairāwhiti

1 min ago

Services Pathway students with tutor Waata Shepherd going through vertical jump exercises which is part of the PAT test (police assessment test) .

An EIT programme for people wanting to join the police, fire service or armed services is fully subscribed, with a waiting list for the next intake in July.

The 19-week, full-time Services Pathway certificate programme is led by former Gisborne District Police Commander, Superintendent Waata Shepherd, who has a strong interest in youth leadership.

The programme covers a full range of pre-entry skills training, including literacy, numeracy, computing, communication and physical fitness. It also covers work-life skills such as presentation, dealing with stress and leadership.

Following the level 3 certificate programme, Mr Shepherd is able to use his professional networks to help arrange work experience for students seeking to apply for a service career.

There are a maximum of 16 positions in each programme. There were 32 applications for the current programme, which started on February 11 and ends on June 19.

 The second programme this year runs from July to November , which most of the remaining applicants are taking up.

Most of the students are school leavers and almost half are women.

Of the 16 students, 12 are interested in a police career, two in the army, one in the navy and one undecided between the police and the army. 

Of the 14 students who completed the programme last semester, most are now going through the recruitment process, which in the police force, can take three months or more.

One is now in the army, another has had his final acceptance for police training and one is nearly in the Fire Service.

Waata Shepherd takes a personal interest into tracing each student’s progress following their graduation, mentoring and supporting them to help them through what can be an extended recruitment process.

After 38 years in the police service, he views it as a way of giving something back to what was for him a fantastic career.

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EIT’s new joinery programme backed by local industry

Source: Eastern Institute of Technology – Tairāwhiti

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3 mins ago

“There is a massive interest within local industry for qualified joiners and builders,” says EIT carpentry tutor Michael Chapman. “I have talked to at least 20 Hawke’s Bay businesses and they all told me that they are short of young trades people”, says Michael.

As a consequence of the high demand, EIT is launching a new Certificate in Construction Trades Skills Joinery (Level 3). Students can get a head start for a career in joinery and gain skills towards the New Zealand Certificate in Joinery (L 4).

The NZ Certificate in Construction Trades Skills Joinery is a pre-employment programme which offers students practical studies and provides a pathway to an apprenticeship in the construction industry.

Students will gain hands-on skills by learning how to build kitchens, furniture, doors and windows, all while using different timbers and respective hand and power tools. Work experience with local industry will be an important part of the programme.

“The building sector job market is looking rosy nationwide, as the building industry as a whole is booming right around the country,” says Michael.

The new programme will be offered on Hawke’s Bay campus.

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Hannah’s passion for a “dying art”

Source: Eastern Institute of Technology – Tairāwhiti

2 mins ago

Without having any particular interest in cars, Hannah Gray decided to attend the automotive course at EIT’s Trades Academy during her last year of high school in 2016. “There were 17 courses available and I thought it could be cool and something different.”

Hannah enjoyed the three-term experience so much so, that she decided to enroll in EIT’s motor industry certificate. “The tutors made everything very relatable and easy to understand. We did six weeks of engineering too and I particularly liked the welding part,” Hannah remembers.

Her growing interest in welding was the reason why Hannah wanted to further upskill with a mechanical engineering certificate (level 3) which led to what she is doing now.

Hannah was hired by Shaun Moloney, owner of Hawke’s Bay Saw Doctors. At the end of February the 20-year-old finished her 90-day trial period and is now starting an apprenticeship.

It is part of Hannah’s job to sharpen chainsaws, mill blades, drill bits, knives and handsaws, to clean the blades, to replace teeth and to sharpen the tops.

“It’s a physical work which requires a lot of attention to detail,” Hannah explains, “We operate big machines and deal with sharp objects, therefore we have to stay focused and mindful of what is happening around us.”

On some days she is fixing up to 100 blades. Hannah says, she is enjoying the fast pace as days just flow better. 

Shaun is pleased to have Hannah in the team. “She turned up and I was sure that she would bring value to the dynamics of the team.” Employing a female never worried him, “The strength is in the brain anyway,” he smiles.

In her former workplace Hannah had faced criticism from a workmate who told her she wouldn’t be strong enough. “I bit my tongue and didn’t say anything. Luckily my family and my friends are very supportive. I’m working and trying hard and that’s all that matters.”

“Hannah is obviously very keen to get on with the job. After all it’s anything but an ordinary career path. Our trade is actually a dying art and it’s great to see young people wanting to learn it,” says Shaun.

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Infrastructure training programme on track for second semester start

Source: Eastern Institute of Technology – Tairāwhiti

16 mins ago

Leading EIT’s new infrastructure works training programme is Clint Whitewood, a NZ Army-trained infrastructure machinery specialist

EIT has started working with the local roading sector ahead of a new infrastructure works training programme to overcome a skills shortage likely to result from a massive increase in roads funding for this region.

The programme will be part-time to cater for those already working in the industry.

Spearheading it  is former NZ Army infrastructure machinery specialist Clint Whitewood, who also has experience in youth leadership.

Originally from Gisborne, Mr Whitewood looks forward to regular visits back home, where he is working towards implementing the new programme.

He is based at EIT’s Hawke’s Bay campus, which introduced the Infrastructure Works programme last year.

He says the programme is designed to fast-track people into the roading sector, because they will be equipped with actual experience on the most commonly used machinery, such as rollers and excavators.

He says the programme is designed to provide graduates with skills, knowledge and licences so they commence their chosen career in the infrastructure industry.

Graduates of the part time course will emerge with all the essential licence endorsements, including Wheels, Tracks, Rollers, Dangerous Goods and Forklift.

On the programme they will also acquire Level 1 Traffic Control (TC) Management and First Aid Certificates.

 The qualifications are required in a variety of fields, including road construction, quarrying, traffic management, forestry, civil construction and infrastructure.

Because the programme is fees free, it will save roading contractors currently training their own unskilled recruits time and money.

“The luxury of the part-time programme is that the students already employed within the industry have the capacity to up-skill and work at the same time” says Mr Whitewood.

“It is targeted at people with good motor driving skills who will be scooped up fairly quickly with these endorsements,” he says.

The programme includes a huge emphasis on health and safety and plant and equipment maintenance which are in line with current industry-specific skills.

Anyone interested in the programme can get more information from EIT’s Gisborne office.

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Boss signed up whole team for EIT certificate

Source: Eastern Institute of Technology – Tairāwhiti

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  • Boss signed up whole team for EIT certificate

1 min ago

Ivan Bellamy, Karl Nielsen and Mahouri Hodges work for roading company Topline Contracting. In August 2018, their boss, Taurus Taurima signed up 80 percent of his staff including himself for EIT’s Level 3 Certificate in Infrastructure Work. Since all of the men are entitled to scholarships, the certificate is largely cost-free. The part-time option runs over nine months, with one night class and two worksite visits every six weeks. The programme includes a forklift, tracks, rollers, wheels and dangerous goods endorsement as well as a traffic controller, health and safety and first aid training.

Tutor Clint Whitewood is pleased to see his student’s progress. “Qualified road workers are in high demand. Completing the certificate will definitely help them to get a head start in life.” Head of School of Trades, Todd Rogers hopes that more roading companies take the opportunity to have their employees upskilled through EIT, “We can cater to people’s needs by assessing them at their worksite. Doing so, we give them a lot of time on the machines without taking them away from the job.”

Ivan, Karl and Mahouri are motivated to broaden their knowledge and in doing so, gain qualifications that will help in taking their career to the next level. “By continuing to learn and self-improve we can be a good example for our children too,“ they say.

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Experienced Builder to Oversee EIT-Managed Carpentry Apprenticeships

Source: Eastern Institute of Technology – Tairāwhiti

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1 min ago

After more than four decades in the construction business, Allen Barton wants to put something back in the industry by managing EIT’s level four carpentry apprenticeship programme in Gisborne.

Apart from managing over 30 local apprenticeships and leading the theory classes, Mr Barton is helping out with the building trades academy one day a week for secondary school students thinking of a career in construction.

He says the building sector has given him and his family a fantastic lifestyle and feels the time has come to give something back.

Allen has done time in all aspects of the building business since starting his own apprenticeship after finishing school.

After doing his time at the tool end of the trade on building sites, he progressed to become a foreman and site supervisor, later becoming a quantity estimator and project manager.

He moved his family from Tokoroa to Gisborne about 16 years ago when his two daughters were reaching their teens, working in senior roles with local building company City Construction.

He is looking forward to working with a new generation of building apprentices.

As part of their managed apprenticeships in the local industry, students will be undertaking their theory in evening classes at EIT. As well as teaching these classes, Mr Barton will administer their managed apprenticeships

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MIL-OSI New Zealand: Trade Training a Pathway to Successful Business

Source: Eastern Institute of Technology – Tairāwhiti

1 min ago

Ken & Jo Cameron

People who want to secure a good future for themselves in Gisborne should seriously consider getting into a trade, say two local businessmen.

“It’s a field that has been undervalued by the system for many years. For generations students have been told that if they want
to do well they should go to university. In reality some of the most successful people in our community started their business
careers as apprentices,” says Currie Construction project manager Mark van Wijk.

Likewise Ken Cameron, who owns Camech, arguably the biggest heavy vehicle maintenance centre in Gisborne, says there is a big future here for skilled heavy vehicle mechanics, and in fact for all qualified automotive technicians.

We just can’t get enough qualified people,” he says.

After 12 years in business Ken and his wife Jo moved to their six bay purpose-built Camech truck and trailer service centre two
years ago and already need to expand further.

“The trucking industry here is growing rapidly and we need more people to gear up for it,” he says.
He welcomes the new Level 4 automotive apprenticeship programme EIT is offering this year and is urging people to take
advantage of it.

“We can teach an apprentice the practical side but it is much better if they have a classroom in which to do their theory rather
than trying to do it by themselves at home after work.”

Ken Cameron left school in Gisborne to study at Massey University but found it boring and took up a mechanical
apprenticeship instead.

Apprentices are paid while they train and once they qualify are into the serious money.

“These are exciting times within the trades industry, the salary packages, professional development and access to international
platforms have never been so available” says EIT assistant head of the School of Trades and Technology Tim Jagusch.

Many trades people move into managerial roles and salary packages are accelerating as the industry expands and struggles
to fill skill shortages, he says.

Construction and other technical industries today need young people who can use their intelligence as well as their hands, says
Mark van Wijk.

“In this day and age, builders and engineers need to be conversant with quantity surveying, design technology, project
management and virtual reality scoping.

“The old belief that apprenticeships are only for those who can’t get into university is doing industry a huge disservice,” he says.
“We need clever and enthusiastic people who are willing to learn.

“EIT has the facilities, systems and skilled tutors to get people into the top of the field. But people need to stop viewing
technical jobs as the last resort.”
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